Past Student Explorers

Meet students who have participated in opportunities supported by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, from sailing on research expeditions, learning mapping operations, supporting science teams, or building policy and outreach skills.

 

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2019 2018 2017 2016 2016 2015 2014

2019

Akim Mahmud

Akim Mahmud

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training
Post-Graduate, Johns Hopkins University

Akim Mahmud was a 2019 OER Explorer-in-Training. He received his Bachelor of Science in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences from the City College of New York with a minor in Economics, and completed his Master of Science in Marine Science at Coastal Carolina University with a focus on coastal and marine geology. He was also in the advanced GIS program at Johns Hopkins University. As an Explorer-in-Training, Akim participated in the Mapping Deepwater Areas off the Southeast U.S. in Support of the Extended Continental Shelf Project expedition, a 24-day long, 24/7 mapping expedition in the eastern Blake Plateau, northeast of the Bahamas. On board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, he worked as a night watchstander, working alongside mapping watch leads and the senior hydrographic survey technician. His primary responsibilities included acquiring and processing daily Kongsberg EM302 multibeam echosounder bathymetric, backscatter, and water column data; processing Knudsen chirp sub-bottom profiler data; performing routine expandable bathythermographs (XBT) to measure temperature in the water column; and occasionally taking readings of the marine aerosol layer for NASA using an instrument called a sun photometer. For his final project, Akim focused on refining and updating an in-house standard operation procedure.

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Caroline Bradley

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training

Alisa Dalpe

Alisa Dalpe

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of New Hampshire

Alisa Dalpe was a 2019 OER Explorer-in-Training. Allisa graduated in 2016 from Connecticut College with a B.A. in Physics and minors in Mathematics and Environmental Studies. To supplement her studies, she participated in the study abroad program, SEA Semester (Sea Education Association, Woods Hole), first as an undergraduate student and later returning as a deckhand for the program’s transatlantic trip, sailing from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to Cork, Ireland. She gained further experience interning and collaborating with the Naval Undersea Warfare Center – Division in Keyport, Washington. She is currently an Ocean Engineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of New Hampshire, where she specializes in autonomous marine vehicles with a specific interest in autonomous decision making, mission planning, and obstacle avoidance for seafloor mapping and scientific data collection applications.

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Herbert Leavitt

Herbert Leavitt

2019 NOAA Hollings Undergraduate Scholar
Undergraduate, Eckerd College

Herbert Leavitt was a NOAA Hollings Undergraduate Scholar with OER's Science and Technology Division in 2019. At the time of his project, Herbert was a senior completing his Bachelor of Science in Marine Science and Environmental Studies at Eckerd College. His undergraduate research included studies of carbon flux in coastal Louisiana salt marshes, comparisons of bacterial assemblages in Aiptasia as a model for coral, and testing microplastic consumption by marine copepods. His main interest was in research informing conservation and management practices. In the summer of 2019, his project with OER focused on comparing active acoustics (EK60/EK80 data) and remotely operated vehicle video transect data from the Windows to the Deep 2019 expedition. Herbert loves going to sea and sailing, and is an avid SCUBA diver. On land he enjoys the outdoors and playing rugby.

Jahnelle Howe

Jahnelle Howe

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training/NOAA EPP Scholar
Graduate, City College of New York

Jahnelle Howe was a 2019 OER Explorer-in-Training. At the time of her experience, she was a Master's student and NOAA-CREST Fellow at The City College of New York, where she studied Earth and atmospheric science. Her inspiration for pursuing a career in environmental science was sparked by volcanic eruptions in her country of birth, Montserrat. The volcanic eruptions from Soufrière Hills spewed toxins such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide, which are hazardous to both animals and humans. In addition, environmental issues such as food contamination, pollution, and climate change drove Jahnelle to pursue a career in the environmental sciences. Her current field is coastal resilience, researching how coral bleaching events and community structure relate to remote sensing observation of sea surface state variability.

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Katharine Egan

Katharine Egan

2019 NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow
Graduate, University of the Virgin Islands

Katharine Egan was a NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in OER's Science and Technology Division. Katharine received her Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology at the University of Rhode Island (URI), where her undergraduate research focused on salt marsh and macroalgae ecology. At URI, she was awarded the Hollings Scholarship and completed an internship with the NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to analyze coral reef data from the National Coral Reef Monitoring Program (NCRMP). She continued this work as a contractor at NCCOS in Beaufort, North Carolina, with Dr. Shay Viehman. She also worked on a project analyzing data of endangered corals and provided field support as a benthic diver for NCRMP. Katharine’s interest in spatial analyses and data science continued to grow, and she applied her new skill set at the University of the Virgin Islands, completing her Master of Science in Marine and Environmental Science with Dr. Tyler Smith. Her thesis research involved predicting the distribution of coral species in mesophotic reef ecosystems along the Puerto Rican shelf. Katharine also completed an internship with NASA, received funding to conduct outreach activities related to marine debris in the U.S. Virgin Islands, and was a Girl Scout troop leader in North Carolina. When she’s not getting excited about data management, she enjoys reading.

Marcel Peliks

Marcel Peliks

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories

Marcel Peliks was an OER Explorer-in-Training for the first leg of the Windows to the Deep 2019 expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Following his experience on the Okeanos, Marcel Peliks was in his second year working towards a Master’s degree in Geological Oceanography at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. His thesis was focused on developing multibeam mapping capabilities for the school, as well as conducting preliminary surveys of the Monterey Canyon head. His time aboard the Okeanos Explorer exposed him to a top-tier mapping expedition and provided him with an opportunity to adopt knowledge and skills from leading experts in the field. He is eternally grateful for all of his experiences at sea ranging from acquiring, processing, and analyzing seafloor mapping data, becoming familiar with multi-week at-sea routines, to meeting scientists and crew that will forever remain colleagues and friends.

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Pacifica (Kitrea) Takata-Glushkoff

Pacifica (Kitrea) Takata-Glushkoff

2019 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Bowdoin College

Kitrea Takata-Glushkoff was a 2019 OER Explorer-in-Training and a student at Bowdoin College, double-majoring in Earth and oceanographic science and Russian. Through her interdisciplinary studies and research internships in physical oceanography, ecology, metamorphic geology, glaciology, and the Explorer-in-Training program, she is preparing for a career in geoscience research. While her early training focused on both geology and oceanography, she cohesively brought the fields together by delving deeper into marine geology through the Explorer-in-Training program. Ultimately, through a process of knowledge co-production, she hopes to contribute to our collective understanding of climate change impacts on the ocean and cryosphere. She also cares deeply about representing a diverse range of people and knowledge within geoscience. Her experience on the Okeanos Explorer was her first long-term vessel expedition and helped clarify her future graduate study research pursuits.

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Paola Santiago

Paola Santiago

2019 NOAA Educational Partnership Program/Minority Serving Institutions Scholar
Undergraduate, University of Puerto Rico

Paola Santiago was an Educational Partnership Program/Minority Serving Institutions Scholar with the OER Expeditions and Exploration Division in 2019. At the time, Paola was an undergraduate from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras campus, majoring in biology. She worked with multibeam and remotely operated vehicle data of the southeast Atlantic region. As a rising junior at the time of her experience, her past research experiences varied from studying river bioindicators to analyzing bee patterns. In 2018, she helped form the Marine Environmental Society in Puerto Rico, where she organized and volunteered for numerous outreach events to create awareness of current threats to our ocean. She also volunteered as a certified diver on coral reef farms as part of the society’s coral restoration efforts on the island. After seeing the alarming status of the coral reefs, she engaged in an ongoing two-part investigation of the epigenetics of corals. All these experiences drove her to pursue a career path in oceanography. Aside from academics, she loves going to the beach, doing graphic design, and playing instruments.

2018

Sophie Alpert

Sophie Alpert

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

Sophie Alpert received her B.S. in Geology and Environmental Geosciences, focusing on marine and coastal geology, from the College of Charleston, South Carolina in May 2018. After graduating, she was lucky enough to join the Explorer-in-Training program as an offshore mapping intern on the Okeanos Explorer during the 2018 Mapping Deepwater Areas off the Southeast U.S. in Support of the Extended Continental Shelf expedition. Her duties onboard included cleaning and editing collected multibeam and sub-bottom raw data. These data were processed using various softwares including Qimera, Fledermaus, ArcMap, and SEGyJp2. With these data, Sophie was able to create usable surfaces for scientific analysis. This trip was an exploratory mapping expedition from Davisville, Rhode Island, to San Juan, Puerto Rico. For most of the mapping portions of the trip, the ship was located in areas east of the Blake Plateau and northeast of the Bahamas. Since her time as an Explorer-in-Training, Sophie has worked for the Atlantic Hydrographic Branch of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey as a hydrographic data technician. She was accepted into the Oceanography Graduate Program at the University of New Hampshire to pursue a master's degree starting in Fall 2020.

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Derek Bolser

Derek Bolser

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Texas at Austin

Derek Bolser was a 2018 Explorer-in-Training, assisting with efforts to describe methane seeps and collect bathymetric data in the northern Gulf of Mexico and helping to calibrate the Okeanos Explorer’s echosounders. Shortly after his time as an Explorer-in-Training, Derek was able to use the knowledge he gained about operating multibeam echosounders and processing bathymetric data to map a previously undescribed coral reef system in the Central American Caribbean, which is now a candidate for protected area designation. Derek is a Harrington Doctoral Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin in the Marine Science Program. In his dissertation research, he is identifying the drivers of variation in fish distribution, abundance, and community size structure using scientific echosounders and underwater video. He is particularly interested in interactions between fishes and industrial activities in the ocean, so does much of his research around petroleum platforms and ship channels in the Gulf of Mexico.

Gina Selig

Gina Selig

2018 NOAA Educational Partnership Program Scholar
Undergraduate, University of Hawaii at Hilo

Gina Selig, at the time a rising junior at the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH), was a class of 2018 NOAA Education Partnership Program (EPP) Scholar. Gina was a marine science major and chemistry minor with certificates in Data Science and the Marine Option Program. She was an authorized scientific diver for UHH and completed monthly assessments of marine organisms at dive sites on the windward and leeward sides of the Big Island of Hawaii. During the Spring of 2017, she was accepted into the National Science Foundation Scholarship for STEM program (S-STEM) at UHH. She now works as the S-STEM Assistant where she leads an Introduction to Science seminar for incoming students in the program. From the Spring of 2017 to 2018, Gina worked as a year-long intern at the Marine Mammal Center: Ke Kai Ola. As an intern, she assisted with the development of a variety of programs related to Ke Kai Ola and ocean conservation, which included helping to enrich Nā Kōkua o ke Kai, a middle school marine science curriculum. Gina is fascinated with ocean exploration and marine biology, especially species in the deep sea such as corals. Due to her interests in deep-sea biology and exploration technology, she was excited to be an EPP Scholar with OER. For nine weeks of the summer, she worked with her mentors to investigate CAPSTONE campaign Pacific deep-sea discoveries made from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

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Harrison Watson

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Jackson State University

James Murphy

James Murphy

2018 NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow
Graduate, University of Hawaii at Manoa

James Murphy was a 2018 NOAA Sea Grant John A. Knauss Fellow with the OER Science and Technology Division. He received his Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and a Ph.D. in Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. As an undergraduate Minorities Access to Research Careers (MARC) scholar, he conducted award-winning, novel research analyzing shifts in coral metabolism under hypoxia at Kewalo Marine Laboratory. His graduate research under Dr. Robert Richmond involved the development and refinement of molecular biomarkers for detecting oxidative stress in corals and examination of coral reproduction and settlement behaviors. His cultural background as a Native Hawaiian student studying in Hawaii led to him being heavily involved in STEM education and outreach events catered to the Native Hawaiian community throughout the Main Hawaiian Islands and facilitated the integration of Hawaiian cultural protocols into his field research methodology. He is a founding member of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) at the University of Hawaii ‘Ilima Chapter, has worked closely with the NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries during their annual Humpback Whale Sanctuary Ocean Counts, and has been heavily involved in bringing communities on the west side of Oahu to the Pearl Harbor Kalaeloa Wildlife Refuge to work alongside the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on restoration and habitat monitoring efforts.

Kirk McIntosh

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

Mikia Weidenbach

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Post-graduate

Miya Pavlock McAuliffe

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, California State University, Moss Landing

Prian Vidal

Prian Vidal

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, Florida A&M University

Prian Vidal was a 2018 Explorer-in-Training on the Mapping Deepwater Areas Southeast of Bermuda expedition on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. The experience provided Prian with the opportunity to learn how to work with large sets of bathymetric data collected daily over the course of the 24-day expedition and about the day-to-day operations of maintaining a research vessel at sea. During his Explorer-in-Training experience, Prian was a second-year master’s student in the NOAA Center for Coastal and Marine Ecosystems (CCME) at Florida A&M University (FAMU). As a CCME scholar, he applied an interdisciplinary approach to address issues confronting marine and coastal communities. Nutrient enrichment, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, has been identified as one of the leading causes of harmful algal blooms and hypoxia in the coastal waters. Prian studied nitrogen transformations occurring in shellfish aquaculture operations. Shellfish are filter feeders and as they extract particles from the water column, they remove nitrogen and other nutrients from the system. His master’s thesis was focused on the impact, if any, of oyster aquaculture operations on eutrophication off the coast of Panacea, Florida.

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Rebekah Hernandez

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Texas, Rio Grande

Ryan Marr

Ryan Marr

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, East Carolina University

Ryan Marr was a 2018 Explorer-In-Training, participating in the Mapping Deepwater Areas Southeast of Bermuda expedition. He was a master's candidate with the Maritime History Program at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. Having grown up in New Jersey, he was fortunate to be surrounded by numerous Revolutionary War sites and as a result, historical preservation became a lifelong passion for Ryan. His area of concentration was ethnoarchaeology, working on a thesis discussing indigenous vessel design and construction techniques in the Tanga Region of Tanzania. As a maritime archaeologist, he has utilized magnetometers, sidescan sonars, and sea-bottom profiling equipment in the search for potential shipwreck sites or other underwater anomalies.

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Sally Jarmusz

Sally Jarmusz

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Maine Maritime Academy

Sally Jarmusz was a 2018 OER Explorer-in-Training on board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer for the Mapping Deepwater Areas Southeast of Bermuda expedition, working with and learning from the extremely talented science team, ship’s crew, and fellow interns. While on-board, she assisted in conducting seafloor mapping in an area southeast of Bermuda. At the time, she was in a five-year program studying for a B.S. in Marine Science and an Associate’s in Small Vessel Operations with a minor in Sail Training. As part of her program, she worked on an independent research project using sidescan sonar to create a map depicting the sedimentary environments of the local harbor at Maine Maritime Academy. Onboard the Okeanos Explorer, Sally honed her skills in collecting and interpreting sonar imagery. Her fascination in seafloor mapping grew as a Student Opportunity Participant on board Research Vessel Falkor during expeditions to the Phoenix Islands Protected Area in the South Pacific Ocean. Through these experiences, Sally came to truly appreciate not only the vastness of the open ocean, but how much of what lies beneath it has yet to be explored.

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Savannah Goode

Savannah Goode

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Florida State University

Savannah Goode was a 2018 OER Explorer-in-Training on board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer for the Mapping Deepwater Areas Southeast of Bermuda expedition. She received her bachelor's degree in biological sciences from Florida State University (FSU), where she spent much of her time working with Dr. Amy Baco-Taylor studying deep-sea invertebrates. While working in Dr. Baco-Taylor’s lab, she completed two independent projects: 1) examining spatial trends in macrofaunal community structure of the DeSoto Canyon in the Gulf of Mexico and 2) identifying and investigating factors controlling community biodiversity on Mokumanamana in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Savannah also had the amazing opportunity to be a student scientist aboard the Research Vessel Ka’imikai-O-Kanaloa (KOK), assessing the recovery of deep-sea coral communities on seamounts from past trawling events. While on the KOK, she completed five submersible dives and assisted pilots with sample identification and collection. She had previous experience identifying many of the coral and sponge species observed during dives from autonomous underwater vehile (AUV) images, but had never seen these species live and in-person before. After the completion of this cruise, Savannah pursued a Ph.D. in biological oceanography with a focus on deep-sea coral communities. She is specifically interested in deep-sea coral because there are still many gaps in our knowledge of the environmental drivers of dispersal and diversity of these coral communities. As deep-sea communities come under increasing pressures such as from trawling and mineral mining, our understanding of these environmental drivers can be crucial to developing successful management strategies to conserve and/or recover these species. Savannah hopes to not only contribute to our overall understanding of deep-sea coral communities, but also to identify actions that can be taken to protect these communities.

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Treyson Gillespie

Treyson Gillespie

2018 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

Treyson Gillespie was a 2018 OER Explorer-in-Training. At the time of his experience, he was in the final year of his undergraduate degree in geology and environmental geosciences with a concentration in Coastal Geology and Ocean Mapping at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina. He joined the Explorer-in-Training program as an on-shore mapping intern at the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center command center at the University of New Hampshire. His duties included pulling data uploaded from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer from servers throughout the day, including multibeam, split-beam, and sub-bottom raw data, and processing that data using various software. For his final project on the expedition, he created two video fly-throughs of the processed data. One video was a general overview of several survey areas, while the second was of an interesting and unidentified feature found on the seafloor. While mapping, the survey teams on shore and onboard the vessel noticed a huge zig-zag feature, with several almost right angle turns in the backscatter. The team immediately sent screenshots of it to several different scientists and are working on figuring out what it is. It was definitely one of the neatest finds on this survey.

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2017

Adrienne Copeland

Adrienne Copeland

2017 NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow
Graduate, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Adrienne Copeland was OER's 2017 NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow. She received a Bachelor of Science in biology and a Certificate in mathematical biology from Washington State University and a Ph.D. in zoology with a specialization in marine biology from University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Her undergraduate and graduate research varied from topics ranging from single-celled parasite genetics to mammalian behavior, but all of her diverse research projects employed mathematical tools to understand biological principles. This interdisciplinary approach continued in her Ph.D. research with Dr. Whitlow Au. Her current interest focuses on using active and passive acoustics to explore the water column. She led the active acoustic (Simrad EK60) field program for NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center from 2013 - 2017 and has been on over 20 seagoing expeditions, six on which she served as chief scientist, including a 2014 research cruise on Schmidt Ocean Institute's Research Vessel Falkor.

Brandon O'Brien

Brandon O'Brien

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of New Hampshire

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Elizabeth 'Claudia' Thompson

Elizabeth 'Claudia' Thompson

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Community College of American Samoa

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Jay Chitnis

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Hawaii at Manoa

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Kelsey Lane

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
Sea Education Association

Laura Almodovar

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Nikola Rodriguez

Nikola Rodriguez

2017 NOAA Educational Partnership Program Scholar
Undergraduate, University of Hawaii at Hilo

Nikola Rodriguez joined OER as a 2017 NOAA Educational Partnership Program (EPP) Scholar, working on mapping and video analysis. At the time, she was an undergraduate at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, where she was pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science with a minor in chemistry, a Marine Option Program (MOP) Certificate, and a Hawaiian Culture Certificate. As a turtle responder with the Marine Fisheries department on the Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle response team, Nikola helped stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles. She also assisted with educating the community on the importance of protecting the Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle. Her main interests are in coral reef health and underwater ecological surveying. Nikola is an AAUS scientific diver for the University of Hawaiʻi and completed the two-week Quantitative Underwater Ecological Surveying Techniques (QUEST) field course at Kealakekua Bay on the island of Hawaiʻi. QUEST provides science divers with extensive training in survey techniques used by agencies worldwide. Her future plans are to live in Hawaiʻi and work for NOAA as a science diver conducting benthic health research at the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Nikola enjoys freediving, surfing, and hiking into the hard-to-reach places around Hawaiʻi.

Sarah Rosenthal

Sarah Rosenthal

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
Hawaii Pacific University

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Victoria Dickey

2017 OER Explorer-in-Training
Hawaii Pacific University, CSU Moss Landing

2016

Amanda Netburn

Amanda Netburn

2016 NOAA John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellow
Graduate, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Amanda Netburn joined OER as an Executive Sea Grant Knauss Fellow in 2016. Representing California Sea Grant, Amanda holds a Master of Science in marine biodiversity and conservation and a Ph.D. in biological oceanography, both from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She has an enduring passion for the ocean and has previously researched sustainable seafood at a non-governmental organization, taught SCUBA, captained small boats, and cultivated finfish for a sustainable aquaculture start-up. She appreciates the importance of using science to inform the management and conservation of marine resources, and her Ph.D. research focused on understanding how a very abundant community of deep-sea fishes are impacted by natural and human-induced environmental variability. As a Knauss fellow, Amanda was excited to assist with OER’s work on deep pelagic exploration and to learn a little something about the seafloor as well.

Briana Grenier

Briana Grenier

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, University of Rhode Island

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Caitlin Ruby

Caitlin Ruby

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, Mississippi State University

Caitlin's father was an oceanographer and instilled in her his love for everything water related. She always knew she would someday work in the ocean sciences, and has had positions with the Naval Oceanographic Office, NASA's DEVELOP Program, the Naval Research Lab, and NOAA. She gained her bachelor's degree at the University of Southern Mississippi and her master's degree at Mississippi State University. Her graduate research focused on improving the geospatial visualization of OER's ROV video data. Her biggest accomplishment thus far has been mapping a transect of the Mariana Trench while onboard the Okeanos Explorer.

Her personal pastimes include kiteboarding, sailing, scuba diving, trail running, hiking, climbing, snowboarding, and travelling, and she recently spent a year backpacking throughout Asia and Oceania. She currently works for NOAA's National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) through the University of Colorado as OER's Video and Geospatial Data Manager. She is thrilled to work with such a wonderful group of data scientists, researchers, and explorers, and always looks forward to watching Deep Discoverer's live video from the deep!

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Calder Atta

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Boston University

Caroline Cooper

Caroline Cooper

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

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Chloe Baskin-Arboleda

Chloe Baskin-Arboleda

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Rutgers University

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Devin Resko

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Guam

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Liana Roberson

Liana Roberson

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Hawaii at Manoa

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Meagan Putts

Meagan Putts

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, Hawaii Pacific University

Meagan was an OER Explorer-in-Training in 2016. Her time on the Okeanos Explorer provided a deeper understanding of bathymetry data used to analyze the topography of deep-sea lava flows and other features she was studying for her thesis research. The Explorer-in-Training program gave her hands-on experience running and processing data collected from deep-water mapping systems, inclduing Kongsberg EM302 multibeam sonar, EK60 split-beam fisheries sonars, and Knudsen 3260 chirp sub-bottom profiler sonar. The skills she learned and connections she made during this internship helped open many career doors, including the successful publication of her research and the opportunity to sail as a Science Lead during the Deep-sea Symphony 2017: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts expedition and the Deep Connections 2019: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts of the United States and Canada expedition.

Megan is a research associate at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa (UH), focusing on deep-sea coral and sponge communities. For her work, she collaborates with an experienced team of scientists specializing in managing deep-sea data sets and imagery analysis. This team most notably assembled OER's Benthic Animal Guide and completed the video analysis from the 2015-2017 CAPSTONE expeditions. Meagan is also the archivist for the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory archive and one of the team members that operates the University of Hawaii's remotely operated vehicle, Lu‘ukai.

Meagan completed her bachelor's in marine science and visual arts at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida, followed by three years working as a taxonomist for an environmental consultating company. She then went on to pursued her M.S. in marine science at Hawai‘i Pacific University (HPU). Her thesis research at HPU focused on the development of deep-sea coral communities by comparing coral assemblages of varying ages growing on Hawaiian lava flows from the volcano Mauna Loa. Hawaii is one of the few places in the world where such a study can take place as the lava flows allow us to examine how the community changes across time scales longer than would be normally possible within a human lifetime.

View Benthic Deepwater Animal Guide View Related Expedition HURL Archive  View Abstract  View Related Expedition View Related Expedition
Melissa Price

Melissa Price

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, East Carolina University

Melissa R. Price is an underwater archaeologist for the Florida Department of State. She specializes in Southeastern Archaic submerged archaeological sites, Spanish Colonial shipwrecks, and the effects of treasure hunting on historic shipwrecks. She is a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor, and Diving Safety Officer. She earned her doctorate at Leiden University in the Netherlands, where her dissertation research traced the inundation of an 8,000-year-old archaeological site in the Gulf of Mexico using oyster shells as a marker for sea level rise. Her research investigated how marine transgression affects prehistoric archaeological sites, especially those that contain delicate organic material like wood and textiles.

In March 2016, Melissa served as a mapping intern onboard the Okeanos Explorer as it traversed the Pacific Ocean between Kwajalein, Wake Island, and Guam, with an emphasis on exploration within the Wake Island Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. During the internship, she created a poster that discussed sub-bottom profiling and the technology used to capture sediment profiles. She examined profiles of selected seamounts and abyssal hills covered with over 100 meters of sediment.

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Shelby Bowden

Shelby Bowden

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

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Stephanie Martinez-Rivera

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Wilmelie Cruz-Marrero

2016 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Maryland Eastern Shore

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2015

Abigail Casavant

Abigail Casavant

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Rhode Island

Abigail Casavant sailed on the Okeanos Explorer as an Explorer-in-Training in 2015. At the time, she was a master's candidate at the University of Rhode Island (URI) in history and underwater archaeology, where she also earned her graduate certificate in GIS and remote sensing in 2014. She previously earned her bachelor's in history, anthropology, and underwater archaeology at URI in 2012. Her research interests include Irish immigrant shipwrecks of the 19th century, 19th century Ottoman naval history and archaeology in Israel, and underwater archaeological applications of GIS and remote sensing. She is an avid recreational and scientific diver, and especially enjoys diving the cold, murky waters of Rhode Island.

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Chelsea Wegner

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Dan Tauriello

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of New Hampshire

Jennifer Johnson

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Jonathan Cotugno

Jonathan Cotugno

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, University of Florida

Jonathan Cotugno was an OER Explorer-in-Training in 2015. He received his Bachelor's of Science from the Geomatics Program at the University of Florida. He was highly interested in all types of geospatial mapping, especially aerial photogrammetric and hydrographic sonar mapping. He hopes to continue his research using remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) for aerial mapping in academia or in industry. In his spare time, Jonathan enjoys jamming to music, reading, and studying maps.

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Josh Humberston

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of New Hampshire

Josue Millan

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Puerto Rico

Kate von Krusenstiern

Kate von Krusenstiern

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, Western Washington University

Kate von Krusenstiern was a 2015 OER Explorer-in-Training on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in physical geography, geographic information systems (GIS), and geology. Her experience on the Okeanos was her first time at sea and her first time using and processing multibeam bathymetry data. She is interested in continuing her studies researching applications of GIS to ocean science and ocean exploration. In the meantime, Kate hopes to continue working at sea, learning more about ocean mapping, and participating in cruises.

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Kristen Mello

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, University of New Hampshire

Lindsay Veazey

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Graduate, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Luan Heywood

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Iowa

Margot Buchbinder

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Maria Cardona Maldonado

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Maria Cooksey

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

Maxime Philip

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Michael Berber

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training

Neah Baechler

Neah Baechler

2015 OER Explorer-in-Training
Undergraduate, College of Charleston

Neah Baechler was a 2015 OER Explorer-in-Training and has been mapping aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer ever since. Neah graduated with a Bachelor of Science in geology from the College of Charleston. During her time there, she was a Benthic Acoustic Mapping and Sonar (BEAMS) program student who had the opportunity to sail on multiple research expeditions with NOAA, the University of Washington, and with hydrographic firms in the private sector.

Now the owner and operator of Abyss Hydrographic Mapping, Neah works with a variety of science-focused exploration vessels worldwide to grow the collective understanding of oceanographic processes and expand existing bathymetric maps. Discovery-driven mapping like that done aboard the Okeanos Explorer is not only Neah’s bread and butter, it’s her reason for getting up in the morning. She’s passionate about the environment and believes that by studying the ocean, we can broaden and deepen our understanding of the planet as a whole. Supporting the Okeanos Explorer’s mission, particularly on remotely operated vehicle (ROV) cruises when a bathymetric map collected and processed overnight can lead to incredible discoveries during an ROV dive the next day, is truly exhilarating for Neah.

View Explorer-in-Training Profile

2014

Andrew Augustyn

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Danielle Ferraro

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Delaware

Danielle Lifavi

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
University of Delaware

Kalina Grabb

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
Harvard University

Kevin Parine

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Lydia Auner

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
Carlton College

Marah Dahn

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Meghan Jones

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Rachel Husted

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
MD Sea Grant

Rebekah Rodriguez

Rebekah Rodriguez

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training
MD Sea Grant

Samuel Grosenick

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Shannon Penna

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Timothy Hodson

2014 OER Explorer-in-Training

Tomer Ketter

Tomer Ketter

2014 GEBCO
Undergraduate, University of New Hampshire

Tomer Ketter was a Nippon Foundation GEBCO scholar at the University of New Hampshire's Ocean Mapping program from 2013-2014. Following a circumnavigation of Kodiak Island on board NOAA Ship Fairweather in the summer of 2014, his project with OER focused on evaluating the new seep detection tool for multibeam watercolumn backscatter data using EM302 data from several Okeanos Explorer expeditions. Following his internship with OER, Tomer was appointed as Hydrographer of the National Oceanographic Institute of Israel and continued sailing and mapping on various expeditions aboard Research Vessel (R/V) Bat-Galim, R/V Falkor, Deep Submersible Support Vessel Pressure Drop, and more.