Ocean Exploration News

Ocean exploration is a dynamic and exciting field. New discoveries and explorations, advances in technology, and important findings in deep-ocean science happen every day. The items on this page capture big news in ocean exploration, not just at NOAA, but around the field. Check back regularly to stay on top of the ever-changing world of deep-ocean exploration or visit the archive for past stories.

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2018

  • An Incredible New Ecosystem Has Been Discovered at The Bottom of The Ocean 

    December 14, 2018  |  Science Alert

    Deep under the ocean, in the dark, dark depths, marine scientists have discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, hosting an ecosystem unlike any other - with a plethora of species that have never been seen before.

  • The UN backed Seabed project aims to create entire ocean map by 2030 to explore deep sea resources 

    December 10, 2018  |  Geospatial World

    The U.N.-backed project, called Seabed 2030, is urging countries and companies to pool data to create a map of the entire ocean floor by 2030 which will be freely available to all.

  • Titanic: The untold story 

    December 9, 2018  |  CBS News

    In 1985 oceanographer and Naval Reserve commanding officer Robert Ballard stunned the world when he found the Titanic. But how he did it remained a highly-classified U.S. government Cold War secret for decades. An exhibition at the National Geographic museum in Washington, D.C., called "Titanic: The Untold Story," recounts the tragic fate of the ship, a supposedly unsinkable liner that struck an iceberg on April 15, 1912.

  • 'Psychedelic' jellyfish dominates the deep-sea dance floor 

    December 6, 2018  |  Mother Nature Network

    Scientists exploring the deep sea off the coast of Puerto Rico recently spotted a stunning species of jellyfish they've since nicknamed "the psychedelic Medusa." Officially known as a Rhopalonematid jelly Crossota millsae, this species previously has been spotted in depths below 3,000 feet (914 meters) in deep-sea regions from the Pacific to the Arctic.

  • The $3 billion map: scientists pool oceans of data to plot Earth's final frontier 

    December 5, 2018  |  Reuters

    A U.N.-backed project, called Seabed 2030, is urging countries and companies to pool data to create a map of the entire ocean floor by 2030. The map will be freely available to all.

  • My Deep Sea, My Backyard: Empowering Nations To Study The Deep 

    November 21, 2018  |  Forbes

    What would you say is the biggest collection of human history? While a museum may be on the tip of your tongue, let me stop you right there to tell you that you are wrong. It isn’t a museum, but an environment that most likely holds more human history than every museum on our planet combined: our oceans.

  • Scientists Wind up Deep-Water Probes in Caribbean Waters 

    November 21, 2018  |  U.S News and World Report

    U.S. scientists have wrapped up a 22-day mission exploring waters around Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands with the deepest dives ever undertaken in the region.

  • Norwegian billionaire funds deluxe deep ocean research ship 

    November 19, 2018  |  Science Magazine

    "A dream vessel" is what Joana Xavier, a sponge expert at the Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental Research in Porto, Portugal, calls a new research ship due to launch in 2021. Funded by a Norwegian billionaire, the 183-meter-long Research Expedition Vessel (REV) will be the largest such ship ever built, more than twice the length of most rivals. Engineered to endure polar ice, punishing weather, and around-the-world voyages, the REV will not only be big and tough, but packed with top-of-the-line research gear—and luxurious accommodations.

  • Scientists call this a 'psychedelic Medusa' 

    November 19, 2018  |  CNN

    Last week, scientific explorers caught a jellyfish in such an electrifying pose that they're calling it the "psychedelic Medusa." Scientists suggest the jellyfish, officially called Rhopalonematid jelly Crossota millsae, hovers just above the seafloor, while its tentacles reach out 360 degrees ready to sting its prey.

  • Photos: Ghostly Dumbo Octopus Dances In the Deep Sea 

    November 2, 2018  |  Live Science

    During the Oct. 23, 2018 dive of the ROV Hercules, part of the Nautilus exploration program, a cirrate octopod of the Grimpoteuthis species swam into view. Using the scaling lasers aboard the ROV, the research team estimated the animal to be less than 2 feet (60 centimeters) long.

  • Watch as a ghostly octopus swims through dark waters off the California coast 

    October 25, 2018  |  Mashable

    On Tuesday at some 10,000 feet beneath the sea, marine scientists spotted a little-seen octopus swimming through the dark, black waters. A robotic Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) piloted by the Ocean Exploration Trust filmed this genus of Octopus, the bell-shaped Grimpoteuthis, as the ROV maneuvered around a deep-sea reef off the central California coast.

  • OSU-led researchers find Earth's deepest eruption 

    October 24, 2018  |  KTVZ.COM

    A team of researchers led by an Oregon State University marine geologist has documented a recent volcanic eruption on the Mariana back-arc in the western Pacific Ocean that is about 14,700 feet, or 2.8 miles, below the ocean surface, making it the deepest known eruption on Earth.

  • Researchers just found a bizarre 'headless chicken monster' swimming deep in the Antarctic Ocean 

    October 22, 2018  |  USA Today

    A "headless chicken monster" was spotted swimming in the Antarctic Ocean, Australian researchers announced Sunday. The bizarre creature that does indeed look like it's missing a head is actually a sea cucumber scientifically known as Enypniastes eximia.

  • Deep sea exploration mission launched from JAXPORT Terminal 

    October 19, 2018  |  WJXT News4Jax

    Researchers from the ocean exploration group DEEP SEARCH, (Deep Sea Exploration to Advance Research on Coral/Canyon/Cold seep Habitats) recently used JAXPORT as a home base. They spent a week at sea studying underwater ecosystems from the Florida/Georgia border to North Carolina aboard the TDI-Brooks International Inc. research vessel Brooks McCall. The information gathered will be used to help protect underwater ecosystems.

  • National Geographic To Donate 1,000 Underwater Drones For Ocean Exploration 

    October 19, 2018  |  Deeper Blue

    National Geographic announced this week it has partnered with underwater drone company OpenROV to launch the Science Exploration Education (S.E.E.) Initiative, a pioneering effort to explore the ocean. Beginning in 2019, the S.E.E. Initiative will donate 1,000 underwater drones to explore, monitor and protect marine environments.

  • Bioinspired camera could help self-driving cars see better 

    October 12, 2018  |  Science Daily

    Inspired by the visual system of the mantis shrimp-researchers have created a new type of camera that could greatly improve the ability of cars to spot hazards in challenging imaging conditions.

  • New UW-authored children’s book offers a robot’s-eye view of the deep ocean 

    October 12, 2018  |  University of Washington News

    After years working on a cabled observatory that monitors the Pacific Northwest seafloor and water above, a University of Washington engineer decided to share the wonder of the deep sea with younger audiences. The result is “ROPOS and the Underwater Volcano,” published this month by Virginia-based Mascot Books.

  • Ancient Shipwrecks Found in Greek Waters Tell Tale of Trade Routes 

    October 11, 2018  |  Marine Technology News

    Archaeologists in Greece have discovered at least 58 shipwrecks, many laden with antiquities, in what they say may be the largest concentration of ancient wrecks ever found in the Aegean and possibly the whole of the Mediterranean.

  • Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Finalists Sail to Southern Greece for $7M 

    October 9, 2018  |  Robotics Business Review

    XPRIZE, the global leader in designing and operating world-changing incentive competitions, today announced the deep sea off Kalamata, Greece, has been chosen as the field testing location for finalist teams competing in the $7 million Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE. Deep sea, real-world testing is a key stage in the three-year global competition challenging teams to advance ocean technologies for rapid, unmanned, and high-resolution ocean exploration and discovery.

  • Earth Matters: Researching the corals of the Monterey Bay Sanctuary 

    October 4, 2018  |  Santa Cruz Sentinel

    Few think of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary as the home to beautiful corals, but oceanographic surveys scheduled to begin Oct. 21 will bring these deep-sea soft corals to life for all of us. The peaks of the Davidson Seamount lay 5,000 feet below the ocean surface, approximately 70 miles southwest of the Monterey Peninsula. This underwater mountain is home to large soft corals and sponges as well as crabs, fish and sea stars. The seamount is 8 miles wide and 26 miles long, rises 8,000 feet off the deep ocean floor and is the next destination for the exploration vessel Nautilus.

  • Is This the Last Chance to See the Titanic

    October 2, 2018  |  BBC

    And while the expedition is a commercial venture, it is a scientific one too: the group will use advanced 3D-modelling tools to analyse and preserve the memory of the Titanic for generations to come.

  • Mapping the Future 

    September 25, 2018  |  Marine Technology News

    Marine Technology Reporter catches up with Dr. Jyotika Virmani, Ph.D, Senior Director, Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE and members of the GEBCO-NF Alumni Team as the conclusion to the $7 Million Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE fast approaches.

  • Watch scientists delight over rare footage of a freakishly cute eel 

    September 21, 2018  |  The Washington Post

    Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, the nation’s largest protected area, stretches over half-a-million square miles of sea and land in Hawaii. It also includes wonderfully odd and stretchy critters, as a research team aboard the exploration vessel Nautilus observed Thursday.

  • Huge marine protection area to be created off northern Vancouver Island 

    September 13, 2018  |  The Canadian Press

    Shell Canada Ltd. has given up its ocean exploration rights off northern Vancouver Island, clearing the way for the creation of Canada’s first protected marine area under the Canada Wildlife Act.

  • Scientists discover three new sea creatures in depths of the Pacific Ocean 

    September 11, 2018  |  The Washington Post

    In their latest trip to the Atacama Trench, one of the deepest points in the Pacific Ocean, a team of scientists repeatedly lowered a device called a deep-sea lander overboard and watched as it sank into the cold, dark waters.

  • Bubble hunters: Ocean scientists count 1,000 methane seeps off Pacific Northwest coast 

    August 31, 2018  |  NW News Network

    Ocean researchers have found nearly 1,000 methane seep sites along the continental shelf of the Pacific Northwest. The bubble streams could be a sign of offshore energy potential, represent a greenhouse gas threat — or be neither of those things at all.

  • In Photos: Exploring the Deep-Sea Secrets of the American Deep South 

    August 31, 2018  |  News Deeply

    In June, an expedition set off to explore a poorly understood region of the deep sea near the coasts of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. NOAA expedition coordinator Kasey Cantwell describes the discoveries that surprised scientists.

  • A Deep Ocean Dive Is Training NASA For Space 

    August 31, 2018  |  Science Friday

    NASA is exploring a deep-sea volcano off the coast of Hawaii as a test run for human and robotic missions to Mars and beyond. The mission, dubbed SUBSEA, or Systematic Underwater Biogeochemical Science and Exploration Analog, will examine microbial life on the Lō`ihi seamount.

  • AI Guides Rapid Data-Driven Exploration of Changing Underwater Habitats 

    August 30, 2018  |  Marine Technology News

    A recent expedition led by Dr. Blair Thornton, holding Associate Professorships at both the University of Southampton and the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, demonstrated how the use of autonomous robotics and artificial intelligence at sea can dramatically accelerate the exploration and study of hard to reach deep sea ecosystems, like intermittently active methane seeps.

  • Huge deep-sea coral reef discovered off the South Carolina coast 

    August 29, 2018  |  NBC News

    In a discovery that significantly shifts scientists' thinking about coral formation, researchers have found a vast coral reef deep in the Atlantic Ocean some 160 miles off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina.

  • NASA is preparing for future space missions by exploring underwater volcanoes off Hawaii 

    August 27, 2018  |  Popular Science

    Planned planetary missions like Europa Clipper and possible future missions to Enceladus could look for evidence of habitability, or maybe even microbial life in the oceans beneath those crusts, but before we arrive at these alien worlds to determine their habitability, NASA needs to better understand what these environments might be like. As it turns out, one of the best places to do this is right here on Earth.

  • Scientists Discover Giant Deep-Sea Coral Reef Off Atlantic Coast 

    August 25, 2018  |  Huffington Post

    As the research vessel Atlantis made its way out to sea from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, last week, expedition chief scientist Erik Cordes predicted the team would discover something no one has ever seen before. It didn’t take long.

  • Submarine breakthrough: MIT develops wireless system to let subs communicate with planes 

    August 23, 2018  |  Fox News

    Researchers at MIT have developed a system that helps solve a longstanding problem in wireless communication – how to send data directly from a submarine to a plane or drone.

  • WWII destroyer remains found off the coast of Alaska 

    August 16, 2018  |  CNN

    After 75 years, researchers have discovered the stern of a World War II destroyer off the coast of Alaska and presumably, the final resting place of 70 crew members who were never found after the vessel was hit by a Japanese mine.

  • Searchers find the sunken stern of a doomed World War II destroyer off the coast of Alaska 

    August 15, 2018  |  Washington Post

    The the stern of the USS Abner Read was recently found the off the Aleutian island of Kiska, where it sank during World War II after hitting a mine. Seventy-one Navy sailors were lost in the aftermath of the blast.

  • Researchers discover mesmerizing underwater world teeming with new life 

    August 7, 2018  |  Mother Nature Network

    If the planet stands any chance of keeping a secret from prying humans, it's deep in the oceans. In fact, we've long known there are sprawling ranges — called seamounts — deep underwater, many as breathtakingly grand as anything we've seen on terra firma. Being in the deepest depths, those clandestine cliffs and nebulous valleys elude not just human eyes, but even sea-probing satellites and sonar-equipped ships.

  • Audio Reveals Sizes of Methane Bubbles Rising from the Seafloor 

    August 6, 2018  |  Eos

    A sensitive underwater microphone captures the sounds of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, escaping into waters off the coast of Oregon. Using this sound, researchers can estimate the bubbles’ sizes.

  • Shipboard design and fabrication of custom 3D-printed soft robotic manipulators for the investigation of delicate deep-sea organisms 

    August 1, 2018  |  PLoS ONE

    Soft robotics is an emerging technology that has shown considerable promise in deep-sea marine biological applications. It is particularly useful in facilitating delicate interactions with fragile marine organisms. This study describes the shipboard design, 3D printing and integration of custom soft robotic manipulators for investigating and interacting with deep-sea organisms.

  • Science, 'sailbots,' and the deep distant sea 

    August 1, 2018  |  Black Mountain News

    Ocean scientists can face hazards on and below the surface of the sea that few of us on shore may ever know. Overcoming potential dangers such as hurricane-force winds, rare 60-foot “rogue waves,” and perhaps even icebergs, as well as facing the deep ocean’s near-freezing temperatures, total darkness and crushing pressure can be part of the job. All just to get to a workplace.

  • Don’t Squish the Jellyfish. Capture It With a Folding Robotic Claw. 

    July 18, 2018  |  The New York Times

    A new invention could help marine scientists study sea creatures in their natural habitat more effectively without harming them in the process.

  • 'Horror' Lizardfish and Weird Unidentifiable Creatures Found Chilling off Carolina Coast 

    July 12, 2018  |  People

    Ever wonder what is hanging out below your feet in open water? Well, if you are swimming off the coast of the Carolinas a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Exploration and Research team has the answer, and you might not like it.

  • Possible Meteorite Fragments Found in Marine Sanctuary 

    July 12, 2018  |  Marine Technology News

    In the first ever intentional hunt for a meteorite at sea, researchers set out to investigate the largest recorded meteorite to strike the United States in 21 years. They recovered from the ocean what are believed to be pieces of the dense, interstellar rock.

  • NASA is Hunting for Meteorites Deep Under the Sea – You Can Come Along for the Ride 

    July 2, 2018  |  Newsweek

    On March 7, a minivan-sized meteor flashed through the skies at about nine miles per second before splitting up and splashing into the waters of the Pacific Ocean. NASA scientists are among those hunting for the fragments on the Ocean Exploration Trust's E/V Nautilus ship. NASA planetary scientist Marc Fries marked out a 0.4 square mile region of ocean some 330 feet deep to hunt for the meteorites.

  • 'Sonar Anomaly' Isn't a Shipwreck, and It's Definitely Not Aliens, NOAA Says 

    June 28, 2018  |  LiveScience

    The suspenseful wait is over: The unusual "sonar anomaly" detected by an aquatic robot off the coast of North Carolina isn't a shipwreck, and it isn't aliens, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Rather, it's "geologic in origin," NOAA Ocean Explorer reported in a tweet yesterday (June 27).

  • Scientists use hydrophone to listen in on methane seeps in ocean 

    June 26, 2018  |  EurkeAlert!

    A research team has successfully recorded the sound of methane bubbles from the seafloor off the Oregon coast using a hydrophone, opening the door to using acoustics to identify - and perhaps quantify - this important greenhouse gas in the ocean.

  • After filming giant squids, scientists ponder what else lurks deep within the oceans 

    June 19, 2018  |  Mashable

    For centuries, sailors spoke about a tentacled monster called "the Kraken" that lurked in the oceans. "There were tales of them pulling ships and men to their death, which may have been partially true, although sailors tell tales," Edith Widder, a marine biologist, said in an interview. The Kraken, however, might exist — in the form of the elusive giant squid.

  • Researchers document widespread methane seeps off Oregon coast 

    May 31, 2018  |  Phys.org

    For the past two years, scientists from Oregon State University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have surveyed the Pacific Northwest near-shore region mapping sites where underwater bubble streams signify methane gas is being released from the seafloor.

  • This Contorted Mystery Squid May Be the 'Most Bizarre' Ever Seen 

    April 20, 2018  |  Live Science

    Unusual deep-sea creatures seen for the first time can sometimes stump even a seasoned expert in marine biology. And in a recent video of an ocean dive in the Gulf of Mexico, an expert's off-camera exclamation revealed his surprised response to the appearance of a squid that had contorted itself into such a peculiar shape that it barely resembled a squid at all.

  • 12 photos show how humans explored Earth's oceans from the 1600s to now 

    April 19, 2018  |  Business Insider

    The world's oceans cover 71% of the planet's surface, yet we've more thoroughly mapped the surface of Mars than we have the ocean floor. At the recent opening of an exhibit about exploring unseen parts of the ocean at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), Investor Ray Dalio put the ocean's immensity into perspective.

  • Mapping Our Planet, One Ocean at a Time 

    April 2, 2018  |  WeatherNation

    It could be said that Earth’s oceans are the final frontier in exploration. More than 80 percent of the world’s oceans remain unexplored and unmapped. Compare that to the moon and Mars, which have both been mapped completely, and we are woefully behind in discovering what lies beneath.

  • Deep-Sea Coral Ecosystems May Hold Cancer Cures, But They Face Threats 

    February 26, 2018  |  EcoWatch

    To Shirley Pomponi the sea sponges lining her office shelves are more than colorful specimens; they're potentially lifesaving creatures, some of which could hold the complex secrets to cures for cancers and other diseases.

  • Watch the adorable, first-ever video of a newborn dumbo octopus 

    February 20, 2018  |  Washington Post

    A baby dumbo octopus is just like its parent, but tiny — which makes it even more adorable. The creature was seen for the first time in footage taken in 2005 by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ecologist Tim Shank. In the video and the accompanying research paper, published this week in the journal Current Biology, Shank and his colleagues report that within 10 minutes of hatching, the young octopus behaved like a fully grown adult.

  • First Video of Baby Dumbo Octopus Shows They’re Fully Formed From Birth 

    February 20, 2018  |  Smithsonian.com

    Scientists’ understanding of the Dumbo octopus is relatively limited, but a new study in Current Biology sheds some light on the deep sea dwellers, detailing the first observations of dumbo octopus hatchlings. The biggest takeaway? Newly hatched Dumbo octopuses are nearly identical to their adult counterparts, which means their trademark fins are present from the very beginning.

  • First Video of Baby Dumbo Octopus Shows They’re Fully Formed From Birth 

    February 20, 2018  |  Smithsonian.com

    Scientists’ understanding of the Dumbo octopus is relatively limited, but a new study in Current Biology sheds some light on the deep sea dwellers, detailing the first observations of dumbo octopus hatchlings. The biggest takeaway? Newly hatched Dumbo octopuses are nearly identical to their adult counterparts, which means their trademark fins are present from the very beginning.

  • Solving the Sky-High Costs of Ocean Exploration with A.I. 

    February 9, 2018  |  News Deeply

    Research ships are vital for advancing marine science but are costly to operate. Oscar Pizarro, a scientist at the University of Sydney’s Australian Centre for Field Robotics and the Schmidt Ocean Institute, thinks automated expeditions are the future of ocean science.

  • Scientists caught the deepest fish in the ocean on camera over 5 miles below the surface — take a look 

    January 24, 2018  |  Business Insider

    A team of Japanese scientists set a record catching the deepest-dwelling fish on camera more than 26,000 feet below the surface. The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), filmed a snailfish in late August in the Marianas Trench — the deepest zone of the Pacific Ocean — at 26,830 feet below the surface.

  • Lanternfish reveal how ocean warming impacts the twilight zone 

    January 18, 2018  |  ENN

    A new study from the British Antarctic Survey shows how lanternfish, small bioluminescent fish, are likely to respond to the warming of the Southern Ocean.

  • Scientists spent a month exploring the Gulf of Mexico's deep sea habitats — and the images they brought back are astonishing 

    January 15, 2018  |  Business Insider

    There's a spectacular, uncharted alien world right off the Gulf Coast, and a recent National Oceanic and Atmospheric (NOAA) expedition sought to uncover its secrets. This past December, a NOAA team, aboard the Okeanos Explorer, conducted the first of three month-long studies of the deepest parts of the Gulf of Mexico, with the dual aim of exploring the diversity of deep-water habitats and mapping the seafloor.

2017

  • Eight Awe-Inspiring Ocean Discoveries in 2017 

    December 26, 2017  |  Oceans Deeply

    In the past year, scientists exploring the world’s marine biodiversity and geology have found the deepest fish in the sea and drilled into a submerged ancient continent. Read more about some of the fruits of the year in ocean exploration.

  • Even at 36,000 Feet Deep, Ocean Creatures Have Plastic in Their Guts 

    November 16, 2017  |  LiveScience

    A new study finds that crustaceans dwelling at the bottom of the 36,000-foot-deep (10,970 meters) trench have microplastics in their guts. In fact, across six deep-ocean trenches in the Pacific, not one was free of plastic contamination, the researchers reported today (Nov. 15).

  • Prepping for Alien Oceans, NASA Goes Deep 

    September 21, 2017  |  Scientific American

    In late 2012 NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope spotted what appeared to be plumes of water vapor spewing from the frozen surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa. Another observation last year provided more evidence this was not a fluke. It is likely that below that distant world’s ice is an ocean larger than all of Earth’s combined. This created a frenzy in the astrobiological community—brimming with all that water, could Europa also have the necessary ingredients for life?

  • Robotic Deep Sea Explorer Uncovers Treasure Trove of Freaky Marine Life 

    August 4, 2017  |  Gizmodo

    Last month, scientists aboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer visited a poorly-explored deep sea area about 940 miles west of Hawaii. From giant sea spiders and rare snailfish through to comb jellies and glass-like corals, these are some of the weirdest critters we’ve seen in a while.

  • Ocean Exploration and the Quest to Inspire the Public 

    June 21, 2017  |  The Huffington Post

    Both space and ocean exploration can boast world firsts, extreme risks, unknown challenges, and mind-boggling discoveries that captivate our imagination and advance our understanding of our world and, fundamentally, of ourselves. So why does space exploration and research capture our collective attention and imagination more than ocean exploration and research?

  • We Need NASA for Ocean Exploration 

    June 8, 2017  |  Inverse Science

    It’s World Oceans Day, and the oceans need our help more than ever. In 2016, Inverse made the case for giving ocean exploration the same attention we give space exploration.

  • Ocean Discovery XPRIZE Aims to Reveal the Deepest Secrets of the Sea 

    April 14, 2017  |  NBC News

    The ocean covers an astonishing two-thirds of our planet. Yet except for a few strange features — including the Romanche Fracture Zone, a valley along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that’s four times bigger than the Grand Canyon; a 4,000-meter cliff near the Bahamas; and a mid-Atlantic mountain chain that spans 40,000 miles and connects the Southern and Northern hemispheres – we know little about the specific features that lie in the deepest parts of the ocean.

  • The 'Curious' Robots Searching for the Ocean's Secrets 

    February 23, 2017  |  The Atlantic

    A new class of machines knows how to recognize and investigate unexpected things that pop up underwater.

  • Inside the U.S.'s Only Ocean Exploration Ship 

    February 17, 2017  |  Scientific American

    A new class of machines knows how to recognize and investigate unexpected things that pop up underwater.

Ocean Exploration News Archive