2016 Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawaiʻi






Background Essays

Hohonu Moana means "deep ocean" in the Hawaiian language. Learn to pronounce the expedition title here.

Download a fact sheet about the expedition.

Mission Plan

Mission Plan

From February 25 to March 18, 2016, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer will explore largely uncharted deep-sea ecosystems and seafloor in and around the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument is one of the largest and most remote marine protected areas on the globe, and as a result is home to a myriad of fascinating biological, geological, and cultural features.

Deep-Sea Corals: A Primer

The Search for the Japanese Aircraft Carriers of the Battle of Midway

The Battle of Midway was the single most important naval engagement of World War II. Occurring just six months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the resounding American victory at Midway checked what had been an almost unbroken string of Japanese victories during the opening phase of the Pacific War.

Deep-Sea Corals: A Primer

Deep-sea Corals: A Primer

If you think of tropical Hawaii and corals, likely what immediately jumps to mind is snorkeling over gorgeous coral reefs teeming with colorful fish. But much deeper below the waves, beyond the depths at which sunlight-dependent reef-forming corals can grow, exists the hidden, perpetually dark world of deep-sea corals.

The History of Mapping and Deep Diving in the Monuments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll

The History of Mapping and Deep Diving in the Monuments of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll

Part the essential homework required for exploring any area is to review all of the mapping and diving that has already been done. Therefore, we are turning in our homework assignment in the form of a summary of the history of mapping and deep water diving that has been carried out in these two monuments.

Seamounts: Underwater Islands of the Pacific

Seamounts: Underwater Islands of the Pacific

The deep seafloor, far from being a smooth muddy plain, is home to a large number of undersea mountains. By definition seamounts are geological structures more than 1,000 meters high, but most are much taller than that, rising from the seafloor at about 5,000 meters depth to within a few hundred meters of the ocean surface.

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