Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts






Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) | Images (Background Essays)

 


Highlight Videos

On Sunday, September 17, the team conducted the first-ever Okeanos remotely operated vehicle dive dedicated exclusively to exploring the water column. The water column is the largest, and least explored, habitat on Earth.

video Dive 11: World of Water (WOW)
On September 17, the team conducted the first-ever Okeanos Explorer dive dedicated exclusively to exploring the water column. (Video)

During Dive 10 at Shostakovich Seamount, the team was stumped by this unusual parasite on a Nematacarsinus sp. shrimp.

video Dive 10: Dead Shrimp Walking?
On Shostakovich Seamount, the team was stumped by this unusual parasite on a shrimp. (Video)

 

 

On September 16, while exploring Shostakovich Seamount at a depth of ~2,800 meters (9,190 feet), the team saw a dense community of huge bamboo coral, some of which were as wide and tall as the remotely operated vehicle.ghlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters (1.9 miles).

video Dive 10: Bamboozled
While exploring Shostakovich Seamount, the team saw a dense community of bamboo coral, some of as big as the ROV. (Video)

Highlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters (1.9 miles).

video Dive 09: Undescribed Verdi
Highlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters. (Video)

These two crabs were observed during the dive on Wagner Seamount, at a depth of ~2,500 meters (1.6 miles). Scientists were not sure if they were observing a predation event or mating behavior during this deep-sea waltz.

video Dive 08: A Precarious Waltz
These two crabs were observed during the dive on Wagner Seamount, at a depth of ~2,500 meters. (Video)

On September 13, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer reached the seafloor at 2,200 meters (1.4 miles) depth on Debussy Seamount and was surrounded by a dense coral and sponge community as far as the camera could see.

video Dive 07: Dense, Diverse, and Hungry
Deep Discoverer reached the seafloor on Debussy Seamount and was surrounded by a dense coral and sponge community. (Video)

While exploring Gounod Seamount at 2,800 meters (1.7 miles), the team encountered this swimming polychaete, which belongs to the aptly named genus, Swima.

video Dive 05: Let's Go Swima
While exploring Gounod Seamount, the team encountered this polychaete. (Video)

On September 10, during the fourth dive of the expedition, scientists explored Sibelius Seamount, starting at a depth 2,600 meters (8,530 feet) and slowly moving up to the flat summit of the seamount.

video Dive 04: The Ocean Knows No Boundaries
On September 10, scientists explored Sibelius Seamount and observed two high-density coral and sponge communities. (Video)

Dive 3 found some beautiful <em>Anthomastus</em> corals.

video Dive 03: Beethoven Ridge
Scientists found beautiful corals, sponges, and other life during Dive 03. (Video)

The first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive ever conducted in the Musicians Seamounts.

video Dive 02: “Beach Ridge”
This was the first ROV dive ever conducted in the Musicians Seamounts. (Video)

During Dive 01, we explored a dense coral and sponge community on

video Dive 01: Prelude
During Dive 01, we explored a dense coral and sponge community on "Tropic of Cancer" seamount. (Video)

 

 

 

(top)

 


Images (Daily Updates)

On Dive 09 at Verdi Seamount, the team observed this ctenophore that may be new to science as it is an undescribed species and in an undescribed family.

September 15
This ctenophore may be new to science as it is an undescribed species and in an undescribed family. (HR)

On September 15, while diving on Verdi Seamount, this curious rattail fish (Coryphaenoides sp.) with parasitic copepod on fin checked out ROV Deep Discoverer.

September 15
This curious rattail fish with a parasitic copepod on its fin checked out Deep Discoverer. (HR)

 

 

ROV Deep Discoverer explores a talus slope on Verdi Seamount.

September 15
ROV Deep Discoverer explores a talus slope on Verdi Seamount. (HR)

Our science team is always excited about acts of predation when exploring the deep sea!

September 14
Our science team is always excited about acts of predation when exploring the deep sea! (HR)

Dive 08 revealed another high-density deep-sea coral community at Wagner Seamount.

September 14
Dive 08 revealed another high-density deep-sea coral community at Wagner Seamount. (HR)

This pair took our science team by surprise. These two Paralomis crabs appear to be in a delicate mating dance.

September 14
These two Paralomis crabs appear to be in a delicate mating dance. (HR)

Rock samples collected during today’s dive, as well as every other dive, will be used to better understand the age and geologic history of this complex region.

September 13
Rock samples collected during dives will be used to better understand the age and geologic history of this complex region. (HR)

Always an exciting find, this deep sea lizardfish was observed close to the shallow edge of the species depth range.

September 13
This deep-sea lizardfish was observed close to the shallow edge of the species depth range. (HR)

A diverse, dense coral community was present throughout the dive at Debussy Seamount. Several colonies were very large, indicating a stable environment for many years.

September 13
A diverse, dense coral community was present throughout the dive at Debussy Seamount. (HR)

Rough seas and high winds to the port side of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 12
Rough seas and high winds to the port side of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Glass sponge observed at 2,730 meters (8,960 feet) while diving at Gounod Seamount on September 11, 2017.

September 11
Glass sponge observed at 2,730 meters while diving at Gounod Seamount. (HR)

A sea spider measuring nearly 30 centimeters (one foot) in diameter feeds on an anemone on Gounod Seamount.

September 11
A sea spider measuring nearly 30 centimeters in diameter feeds on an anemone on Gounod Seamount. (HR)

Dandelion siphonophore observed at Gounod Seamount

September 11
Dandelion siphonophore observed at Gounod Seamount (HR)

On September 10, 2017, while exploring Sibelius Seamount, the team observed this garden of coral at a depth of 2,465 meters (8,080 feet).

September 10
While exploring Sibelius Seamount, the team observed this garden of coral at a depth of 2,465 meters. (HR)

This hatchetfish was spotted in the water column at a depth of 500 meters (1,640 feet) during midwater transects on September 10, 2017.

September 10
This hatchetfish was spotted in the water column at a depth of 500 meters during midwater transects. (HR)

This vibrant yellow glass sponge (Bolosoma sp.) was observed at a depth of 2,479 meters (8,133 feet) while exploring Sibelius Seamount.

September 10
This vibrant yellow glass sponge was observed at a depth of 2,479 meters while exploring Sibelius Seamount. (HR)

This high-density coral and sponge community was observed at a depth of ~2,300 meters (7,545 feet) while exploring Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
This high-density coral and sponge community was observed at a depth of ~2,300 meters on Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

The team observed this unidentified glass sponge while exploring Beethoven Ridge on September 9, 2017.

September 9
The team observed this unidentified glass sponge while exploring Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

Just one of many Anthomastus sp., a type of octocoral, observed at the summit of Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
Just one of many Anthomastus sp., a type of octocoral, observed at the summit of Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

This Primnoid coral was observed at a depth of approximately 3,280 meters (2.0 miles) while diving on “Beach Ridge.”

September 8
This Primnoid coral was observed at a depth of ~3,280 meters while diving on “Beach Ridge.” (HR)

Glass sponges can provide habitat and protection for small organisms like this shrimp, observed at a depth of 3,146 meters.

September 8
Glass sponges can provide habitat and protection for small organisms like this shrimp, observed at 3,146 meters. (HR)

This chanux, a type of anglerfish, was observed at a depth of approximately 3,148 meters (1.96 miles).

September 8
This chanux, a type of anglerfish, was observed at a depth of approximately 3,148 meters. (HR)

One of many sightings during today’s dive of a seastar feeding on coral. Here you can see a Calliaster sp. sea star's tube feet feeding on bamboo coral.

September 7
One of many sightings during today’s dive of a seastar feeding on coral. (HR)

While at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount, we observed a diversity of coral and sponge species. Shown here is a glass sponge and a diversity of octocorals.

September 7
While at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount, we observed a diversity of coral and sponge species. (HR)

A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer is deployed to the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during a training drill off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

September 6
A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer is deployed to the Okeanos Explorer during a training drill. (HR)

A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer prepares to deploy to the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during a training drill off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

September 6
A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer prepares to deploy during a training drill. (HR)

(top)

 


Images (Mission Logs)

Large cology of Iridogorgia magisprialis, an octocoral in the family Chrysogorgiidae.

September 15
Large cology of Iridogorgia magisprialis, an octocoral in the family Chrysogorgiidae. (HR)

Dense and diverse coral community at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount with large Iridogoria sp. (center), bamboo coral (foreground and background), black coral (right), pink coral (right), and glass sponges (lower middle).

September 15
Dense and diverse coral community at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount. (HR)

Example of a habitat suitability model for deep-sea corals in the family Paragorgiidae (pictured top left) in the Main Hawaiian Islands Exclusive Economic Zone.

September 15
Example of a habitat suitability model for deep-sea corals in the family Paragorgiidae. (HR)

 

Beautiful “bamboo forest” of Isididae coral on an outcrop at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount.

September 15
Beautiful “bamboo forest” of Isididae coral on an outcrop at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount. (HR)

This sea toad or coffinfish (Chaunacops species) was seen at a depth of about 3,148 meters (1.96 miles), during a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive at a seamount ridge, dubbed “Beach Ridge,” in the Musicians Seamount group northeast of Oʼahu, Hawaiian Islands.

September 12
This sea toad was seen during a dive at a seamount ridge, dubbed “Beach Ridge.” (HR)

September 12
This Commerson’s frogfish has its lure folded back along its head so that it cannot be seen. (HR)

A Chaunax umbrinus photographed during an Okeanos Explorer ROV dive on the southwest coast of Niʼihau, Hawaiʼi, between 312-538 meters (1024-1765 feet).

September 12
A Chaunax umbrinus photographed during an Okeanos Explorer dive on the southwest coast of Niʼihau, Hawaiʼi. (HR)

September 12
A Chaunacops coloratus photographed during a dive on a flat-topped seamount west of Wake Atoll in 2016. (HR)

This bright-red Chaunacops observed during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition differed from those usually seen by having a brighter color, larger cirri, and smaller or no prickles on its back.

September 12
This bright-red Chaunacops observed during the expedition differed from those usually seen. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer collects a sample of Anthomastus.

September 9
ROV Deep Discoverer collects a sample of Anthomastus. (HR)

colonies of Iridogorgia spotted on dive 2.

September 9
Colonies of Iridogorgia spotted on Dive 02. (HR)

A particularly adorable chaunax observed on dive 3.

September 9
A particularly adorable chaunax observed on Dive 03.

Deep sea coral and sponge communities at Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
Deep-sea coral and sponge communities at Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

Seiros just before launch on our first dive in the Musicians Seamounts.

September 9
Seiros just before launch on our first dive in the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer shortly before departing for the last expedition of NOAA’s Campaign to Address Pacific monument, Science, Technology, and Ocean NEeds (CAPSTONE).

September 9
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer shortly before departing for the last CAPSTONE expedition. (HR)

(top)

 


Images (Background Essays)

During the expedition, NOAA’s ROV Deep Discoverer will be used to acquire high-definition visual data and collect limited samples in poorly explored areas near the boundaries of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and in the Musicians Seamounts.

Mission Plan
Deep Discoverer will be used to acquire high-definition visual data and collect limited samples in poorly explored areas. (HR)

Map of the general expedition operating area. The yellow line is the rough cruise track through the Musicians Seamounts during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition.

Mission Plan
Map of the general expedition operating area. The yellow line is the rough cruise track through the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC. Collaboration among different fields of study is easily fostered with so many scientists working together in one location.

Mission Plan
Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC. (HR)

Map detailing the names of the seamounts within the Musicians Seamounts group.

History
Map detailing the names of the seamounts within the Musicians Seamounts group. (HR)

The best example of a hotspot producing a line of volcanic islands is the Hawaiian hotspot. This drawing, from Thurman’s Introduction to Oceanography, illustrates how the Hawaiian chain formed as the Pacific tectonic plate moved over the hotspot.

History
The best example of a hotspot producing a line of volcanic islands is the Hawaiian hotspot. (HR)

Dr. Henry William Menard, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey from 1978 - 1981. He was credited with naming the Musicians Seamounts group in 1959.

History
Dr. Henry William Menard was credited with naming the Musicians Seamounts group in 1959. (HR)

High-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Biogeography
High-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (HR)

A representation of potential physical (current and depth) and biological (reproduction, larval behavior, settlement) forces that may influence dispersal, colonization, and genetic connectivity among deep-sea coral populations.

Biogeography
A representation of physical and biological forces that influence dispersal, colonization, and genetic connectivity among deep-sea coral populations. (HR)

A high-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Biogeography
High-density coral community in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (HR)

High-density coral community from Keahole Point on the Island of Hawaii in the Main Hawaiian Islands.

Biogeography
High-density coral community from Keahole Point on the Island of Hawaii in the Main Hawaiian Islands. (HR)

Oblique view of Murray Fracture Zone with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale.

Fracture Zones
Oblique view of Murray Fracture Zone with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale. (HR)

Oblique view of focused mapping area of Musicians Seamounts with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale.

Fracture Zones
Oblique view of mapping area of Musicians Seamounts with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale. (HR)

 

 

 

Sign up for the Ocean Explorer Email Update List.

Back to Top