Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts





Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) | Images (Background Essays)

 


Highlight Videos

An overview of the coral communities of the Musicians Seamount area.

video CAPSTONE Homecoming
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer making her way into port in Honolulu, Hawaii, and docking at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor. (Video)

The ocean belongs to no one-the ocean belongs to itself.

video The Ocean Knows No Boundaries
During the expedition, the team explored waters within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone as well as in waters known as the "high seas." (Video)

An overview of the coral communities of the Musicians Seamount area.

video Coral in Concert
An overview of the coral communities of the Musicians Seamount area. (Video)

High density, old growth coral communities observed.

video Dive 22: Lessons from the USS Baltimore
Highlights from the dive on the iron hulled USS Baltimore. (Video)

A rare six gill stingray (Hexatrygon bickelli).

video Dive 21: Finding Mysteries
A rare six gill stingray (Hexatrygon bickelli) and a lantern shark seen on Dive 21. (Video)

High density, old growth coral communities observed.

video Dive 20: All That Glitters
Precious gold coral seen colonizing bamboo coral while exploring Middle Bank. (Video)

High density, old growth coral communities observed.

video Dive 19: Old Growth Forest
High density, old growth coral communities observed. (Video)

While exploring on Schumann Seamount at a depth of ~2,100 meters (6,890 feet), the team encountered this halosaur, belonging to the genus Aldrovandia, as evidenced by the lack of scales on its nose.

video Dive 18: The Little Dragon
While exploring on Schumann Seamount , the team encountered this halosaur, belonging to the genus Aldrovandia. (Video)

This giant species of sponge had only ever been seen twice before, both times in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

video Dive 18: Mega Sponge
This giant species of sponge had only ever been seen twice before, both times in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (Video)

A seastar dining on a Nurella and it's polyps.

video Dive 17: Yum Yum Yum
A seastar dining on a Nurella and its polyps. (Video)

Fauna distributions in the water column.

video Dive 16: Hiding in the Dark
Fauna distributions in the water column. (Video)

A dancing sea cucumber is observed cleaning up the bottom sediment of organic material.

video Dive 15: The Dancing Vacuum Cleaner
A dancing sea cucumber is observed cleaning up the bottom sediment of organic material. (Video)

Structural fractures and lava flow evidence observed at Liszt Seamount.

video Dive 14: The Big Picture
Structural fractures and lava flow evidence observed at Liszt Seamount. (Video)

video Dive 13: The Largest Predator
At 127 centimeters long, this cutthroat eel could be the largest short-finned cutthroat eel ever recorded. (Video)

During the dive on Mussorgsky Seamount, the Okeanos team encountered this crab which appeared to be eating a sponge.

video Dive 12: Munchies
During the dive on Mussorgsky Seamount, scientists saw this crab which appeared to be eating a sponge. (Video)

On Sunday, September 17, the team conducted the first-ever Okeanos remotely operated vehicle dive dedicated exclusively to exploring the water column. The water column is the largest, and least explored, habitat on Earth.

video Dive 11: World of Water (WOW)
On September 17, the team conducted the first-ever Okeanos Explorer dive dedicated exclusively to exploring the water column. (Video)

During Dive 10 at Shostakovich Seamount, the team was stumped by this unusual parasite on a Nematacarsinus sp. shrimp.

video Dive 10: Dead Shrimp Walking?
On Shostakovich Seamount, the team was stumped by this unusual parasite on a shrimp. (Video)

On September 16, while exploring Shostakovich Seamount at a depth of ~2,800 meters (9,190 feet), the team saw a dense community of huge bamboo coral, some of which were as wide and tall as the remotely operated vehicle.ghlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters (1.9 miles).

video Dive 10: Bamboozled
While exploring Shostakovich Seamount, the team saw a dense community of bamboo coral, some of as big as the ROV. (Video)

Highlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters (1.9 miles).

video Dive 09: Undescribed Verdi
Highlights from the September 15 dive on Verdi Seamount at depth of ~3,075 meters. (Video)

These two crabs were observed during the dive on Wagner Seamount, at a depth of ~2,500 meters (1.6 miles). Scientists were not sure if they were observing a predation event or mating behavior during this deep-sea waltz.

video Dive 08: A Precarious Waltz
These two crabs were observed during the dive on Wagner Seamount, at a depth of ~2,500 meters. (Video)

On September 13, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer reached the seafloor at 2,200 meters (1.4 miles) depth on Debussy Seamount and was surrounded by a dense coral and sponge community as far as the camera could see.

video Dive 07: Dense, Diverse, and Hungry
Deep Discoverer reached the seafloor on Debussy Seamount and was surrounded by a dense coral and sponge community. (Video)

While exploring Gounod Seamount at 2,800 meters (1.7 miles), the team encountered this swimming polychaete, which belongs to the aptly named genus, Swima.

video Dive 05: Let's Go Swima
While exploring Gounod Seamount, the team encountered this polychaete. (Video)

On September 10, during the fourth dive of the expedition, scientists explored Sibelius Seamount, starting at a depth 2,600 meters (8,530 feet) and slowly moving up to the flat summit of the seamount.

video Dive 04: The Ocean Knows No Boundaries
On September 10, scientists explored Sibelius Seamount and observed two high-density coral and sponge communities. (Video)

Dive 3 found some beautiful <em>Anthomastus</em> corals.

video Dive 03: Beethoven Ridge
Scientists found beautiful corals, sponges, and other life during Dive 03. (Video)

The first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive ever conducted in the Musicians Seamounts.

video Dive 02: “Beach Ridge”
This was the first ROV dive ever conducted in the Musicians Seamounts. (Video)

During Dive 01, we explored a dense coral and sponge community on

video Dive 01: Prelude
During Dive 01, we explored a dense coral and sponge community on "Tropic of Cancer" seamount. (Video)

 

 

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Images (Daily Updates)

NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> docked at University of Hawaii Marine Center – Pier 35.

September 30
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer docked at University of Hawaii Marine Center – Pier 35. (HR)

The rounded stern of the USS <em>Baltimore</em> was modified to include doors and deployment rails for laying sea mines during World War I.

September 29
The rounded stern of the USS Baltimore was modified for laying sea mines during World War I. (HR)

This view of the USS <em>Baltimore</em> foredeck shows the forecastle and upper hull strakes have been removed, likely to aid the scuttling of the ship.

September 29
This view of the USS Baltimore foredeck shows the forecastle and upper hull strakes have been removed. (HR)

The knife-edge bow stem of the USS <em>Baltimore</em> was covered in brisingids and other deepwater fauna.

September 29
The knife-edge bow stem of the USS Baltimore was covered in brisingids and other deepwater fauna. (HR)

At 785 meters (2,575 feet) depth, remotely operated vehicle <em>Deep Discoverer</em> encountered a World War II-period causeway called a “rhino barge.”

September 28
At 785 meters depth, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered a World War II-period causeway called a “rhino barge.” (HR)

An unusual observation of a six-gilled stingray, Hexatrygon bickelli.

September 28
An unusual observation of a six-gilled stingray, Hexatrygon bickelli. (HR)

View of Oahu from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 27
View of Oahu from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

This cookie star was identified as Sphaeriodiscus ammohiluis.

September 26
This cookie star was identified as Sphaeriodiscus ammohiluis. (HR)

These two colonies could be equated to a before and after shot of colonization by gold coral (left), Kulamanamana haumeaae, and likely host colony species, bamboo coral (right), Acanella sp.

September 26
These two colonies could be equated to a before and after shot of colonization by gold coral and likely host colony species, bamboo coral. (HR)

A scorpion fish, seen next to a mushroom coral, was observed at 460 meters (1,509 feet) depth.

September 26
A scorpion fish, seen next to a mushroom coral, was observed at 460 meters depth. (HR)

A dense pink coral garden was found at nearly 1,800 meters (5,905 feet) on Mendellsohn Seamount

September 25
A dense pink coral garden was found at nearly 1,800 meters on Mendellsohn Seamount. (HR)

This sea spider was observed at about 1,675 meters (5,495 feet) depth on a bamboo coral that has been colonized by yellow parazoanthids.

September 25
This sea spider was observed on a bamboo coral that has been colonized by yellow parazoanthids. (HR)

A pink coral (Hemicorallium sp.) observed at ~1,654 meters (5,426 feet) had a base approximately 18 centimeters (seven inches) wide, indicating a particularly old colony.

September 25
A pink coral observed at ~1,654 meters had a base approximately 18 centimeters wide, indicating a particularly old colony. (HR)

This pair of unusual urchins with soft spines were found at close to 2,290 meters (7,513 feet) depth.

September 24
This pair of unusual urchins with soft spines were found at close to 2,290 meters (7,513 feet) depth. (HR)

A zooanthid overgrows a pink bubblegum coral with a brittlestar associate.

September 24
A zooanthid overgrows a pink bubblegum coral with a brittlestar associate. (HR)

This large rippled sponge, approximately four meters (13.1 feet) in length, looks to be the same animal discovered during the Okeanos Explorer 2015 Hohonu Moana expedition.

September 24
This large rippled sponge looks to be the same animal discovered during the Okeanos Explorer 2015 Hohonu Moana expedition. (HR)

Pink and purple squat lobster, perched on a black coral, is thought to belong a new genus.

September 23
Pink and purple squat lobster, perched on a black coral, is thought to belong a new genus. (HR)

Solmissus jellyfish observed during midwater transects during Dive 17 of the Deep-Sea Symphony: Exploring the Musicians Seamounts expedition.

September 23
Solmissus jellyfish observed during midwater transects during Dive 17 of the expedition. (HR)

An exciting observation during today’s midwater transects, this fangtooth fish was seen at 800 meters (2,625 feet).

September 23
An exciting observation during today’s midwater transects, this fangtooth fish was seen at 800 meters. (HR)

An egg mass observed in the water column. We cannot be sure what type of eggs these are based on images of video alone.

September 22
An egg mass observed in the water column. We cannot be sure what type of eggs these are based on video alone. (HR)

A siphonophore observed in the water column during the second full day of midwater exploration on September 22, 2017.

September 22
A siphonophore observed in the water column during the second full day of midwater exploration. (HR)

A siphonophore observed in the water column during the second full day of midwater exploration on September 22, 2017.

September 22
A siphonophore observed in the water column during the second full day of midwater exploration. (HR)

This glass sponge (Saccocalyx sp.) was one of many glass sponges observed throughout the dive on Mozart Seamount.

September 21
This glass sponge was one of many glass sponges observed throughout the dive on Mozart Seamount. (HR)

The geology highlight of the dive at Mozart Seamount was a field of nearly spherical intact “pillow balls” at approxiamtely 3,765 meters (2.34 miles).

September 21
The geology highlight of the dive at Mozart Seamount was a field of nearly spherical intact “pillow balls.” (HR)

Anemone observed while diving at Mozart Seamount on September 21, 2017.

September 21
Anemone observed while diving at Mozart Seamount on September 21, 2017. (HR)

Pleurogorgia militaris chrysogorgid coral on massive pillow flow outcrop at a depth of 2,527 meters (8,290 feet) on Liszt Seamount..

September 20
Pleurogorgia militaris chrysogorgid coral on massive pillow flow outcrop at a depth of 2,527 meters. (HR)

An unusual looking unknown urchin perched on the underside of a large boulder of volcanic origin at Liszt Seamount.

September 20
An unknown urchin perched on the underside of a large boulder of volcanic origin at Liszt Seamount. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer’s manipulator arm collecting a stalked crinoid while diving at Liszt Seamount.

September 20
ROV Deep Discoverer’s manipulator arm collecting a stalked crinoid while diving at Liszt Seamount. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer documents the benthic communities at Paganini Seamount, capturing high-resolution imagery that can be used by scientists to identify organisms and build a baseline characterization of what these habitats look like.

September 19
ROV Deep Discoverer documents the benthic communities at Paganini Seamount. (HR)

Large Primnoid colonies colonize a rocky outcrop at Paganini Seamount.

September 19
Large Primnoid colonies colonize a rocky outcrop at Paganini Seamount. (HR)

The science team observed a number of amphipods (small white objects) feeding on a salp’s insides (yellow) while exploring the water column on September 19, 2017.

September 19
The science team observed a number of amphipods feeding on a salp’s insides while exploring the water column. (HR)

At the beginning of the dive on Mussorgsky Seamount, the corals were aligned perpendicular to the current, which is the optimal position to acquire food.

September 18
At the beginning of the dive on Mussorgsky Seamount, the corals were aligned perpendicular to the current. (HR)

As the ROVs left the summit of Mussorgsky Seamount, coral continued in every direction as far as the light pool reached.

September 18
As the ROVs left the summit of Mussorgsky Seamount, coral continued in every direction as far as the light pool reached. (HR)

Corals not only provide home for animals, they are also food for coral predators, like this sea star.

September 18
Corals not only provide home for animals, they are also food for coral predators, like this sea star. (HR)

Cranchiid squid observed during the Okeanos Explorer’s first-ever full day of midwater exploration.

September 17
Cranchiid squid observed during the Okeanos Explorer’s first-ever full day of midwater exploration. (HR)

Lancetfish observed during midwater transects on Dive 11 near Mahler Seamount.

September 17
Lancetfish observed during midwater transects on Dive 11 near Mahler Seamount. (HR)

Close-up view of the structure of one of the many glass sponges observed at Shostakovich Seamount.

September 16
Close-up view of one of the many glass sponges observed at Shostakovich Seamount. (HR)

The coral community at Shostakovich Seamount was different than the ones observed on other dives.

September 16
The coral community at Shostakovich Seamount was different than the ones observed on other dives. (HR)

Rattail fish observed while exploring Shostakovich Seamount.

September 16
Rattail fish observed while exploring Shostakovich Seamount. (HR)

On Dive 09 at Verdi Seamount, the team observed this ctenophore that may be new to science as it is an undescribed species and in an undescribed family.

September 15
This ctenophore may be new to science as it is an undescribed species and in an undescribed family. (HR)

On September 15, while diving on Verdi Seamount, this curious rattail fish (Coryphaenoides sp.) with parasitic copepod on fin checked out ROV Deep Discoverer.

September 15
This curious rattail fish with a parasitic copepod on its fin checked out Deep Discoverer. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer explores a talus slope on Verdi Seamount.

September 15
ROV Deep Discoverer explores a talus slope on Verdi Seamount. (HR)

Our science team is always excited about acts of predation when exploring the deep sea!

September 14
Our science team is always excited about acts of predation when exploring the deep sea! (HR)

Dive 08 revealed another high-density deep-sea coral community at Wagner Seamount.

September 14
Dive 08 revealed another high-density deep-sea coral community at Wagner Seamount. (HR)

This pair took our science team by surprise. These two Paralomis crabs appear to be in a delicate mating dance.

September 14
These two Paralomis crabs appear to be in a delicate mating dance. (HR)

Rock samples collected during today’s dive, as well as every other dive, will be used to better understand the age and geologic history of this complex region.

September 13
Rock samples collected during dives will be used to better understand the age and geologic history of this complex region. (HR)

Always an exciting find, this deep sea lizardfish was observed close to the shallow edge of the species depth range.

September 13
This deep-sea lizardfish was observed close to the shallow edge of the species depth range. (HR)

A diverse, dense coral community was present throughout the dive at Debussy Seamount. Several colonies were very large, indicating a stable environment for many years.

September 13
A diverse, dense coral community was present throughout the dive at Debussy Seamount. (HR)

Rough seas and high winds to the port side of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 12
Rough seas and high winds to the port side of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Glass sponge observed at 2,730 meters (8,960 feet) while diving at Gounod Seamount on September 11, 2017.

September 11
Glass sponge observed at 2,730 meters while diving at Gounod Seamount. (HR)

A sea spider measuring nearly 30 centimeters (one foot) in diameter feeds on an anemone on Gounod Seamount.

September 11
A sea spider measuring nearly 30 centimeters in diameter feeds on an anemone on Gounod Seamount. (HR)

Dandelion siphonophore observed at Gounod Seamount

September 11
Dandelion siphonophore observed at Gounod Seamount (HR)

On September 10, 2017, while exploring Sibelius Seamount, the team observed this garden of coral at a depth of 2,465 meters (8,080 feet).

September 10
While exploring Sibelius Seamount, the team observed this garden of coral at a depth of 2,465 meters. (HR)

This hatchetfish was spotted in the water column at a depth of 500 meters (1,640 feet) during midwater transects on September 10, 2017.

September 10
This hatchetfish was spotted in the water column at a depth of 500 meters during midwater transects. (HR)

This vibrant yellow glass sponge (Bolosoma sp.) was observed at a depth of 2,479 meters (8,133 feet) while exploring Sibelius Seamount.

September 10
This vibrant yellow glass sponge was observed at a depth of 2,479 meters while exploring Sibelius Seamount. (HR)

This high-density coral and sponge community was observed at a depth of ~2,300 meters (7,545 feet) while exploring Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
This high-density coral and sponge community was observed at a depth of ~2,300 meters on Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

The team observed this unidentified glass sponge while exploring Beethoven Ridge on September 9, 2017.

September 9
The team observed this unidentified glass sponge while exploring Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

Just one of many Anthomastus sp., a type of octocoral, observed at the summit of Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
Just one of many Anthomastus sp., a type of octocoral, observed at the summit of Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

This Primnoid coral was observed at a depth of approximately 3,280 meters (2.0 miles) while diving on “Beach Ridge.”

September 8
This Primnoid coral was observed at a depth of ~3,280 meters while diving on “Beach Ridge.” (HR)

Glass sponges can provide habitat and protection for small organisms like this shrimp, observed at a depth of 3,146 meters.

September 8
Glass sponges can provide habitat and protection for small organisms like this shrimp, observed at 3,146 meters. (HR)

This chanux, a type of anglerfish, was observed at a depth of approximately 3,148 meters (1.96 miles).

September 8
This chanux, a type of anglerfish, was observed at a depth of approximately 3,148 meters. (HR)

One of many sightings during today’s dive of a seastar feeding on coral. Here you can see a Calliaster sp. sea star's tube feet feeding on bamboo coral.

September 7
One of many sightings during today’s dive of a seastar feeding on coral. (HR)

While at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount, we observed a diversity of coral and sponge species. Shown here is a glass sponge and a diversity of octocorals.

September 7
While at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount, we observed a diversity of coral and sponge species. (HR)

A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer is deployed to the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during a training drill off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

September 6
A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer is deployed to the Okeanos Explorer during a training drill. (HR)

A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer prepares to deploy to the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during a training drill off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

September 6
A U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer prepares to deploy during a training drill. (HR)

 

 

 

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Images (Mission Logs)

A possible volcanic ridge extends eastward from Liszt seamount.

September 28
A possible volcanic ridge extends eastward from Liszt seamount. (HR)

A relatively rare deep sea anglerfish.

September 28
A relatively rare deep sea anglerfish. (HR)

Large, blocky basalt outcrop with dense coral community.

September 28
Large, blocky basalt outcrop with dense coral community. (HR)

Sharp contact between two substrate types.

September 28
Sharp contact between two substrate types. (HR)

The team launches ROV Seirios onto the back deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 26
The team launches ROV Seirios onto the back deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

A 30 meter-long neutral tether connects Seirios to Deep Discoverer.

September 26
A 30 meter-long neutral tether connects Seirios to Deep Discoverer. (HR)

The forward-facing high-definition camera is the most commonly seen view from ROV Seirios.

September 26
The forward-facing high-definition camera is the most commonly seen view from ROV Seirios. (HR)

ROV Seirios acts as a brilliant source of light in the “night sky” of the ocean.

September 26
ROV Seirios acts as a brilliant source of light in the “night sky” of the ocean. (HR)

The landscape views at a number of seamount summits visited in the Musicians Seamounts were similar to this one.

September 24
The landscape views at a number of seamount summits visited in the Musicians Seamounts were similar to this one. (HR)

At a couple different sites, like Liszt Seamount and Beethoven Ridge, mushroom corals, like these Anthomastus, were common.

September 24
At a couple different sites mushroom corals were common. (HR)

Dandelion siphonophores, like this one observed at Gounod Seamount, are always a treat to see.

September 24
Dandelion siphonophores, like this one observed at Gounod Seamount, are always a treat to see. (HR)

It is always exciting to see small, young corals in high density, like we saw at Rapano Ridge, as it is an indication of healthy populations.

September 24
It is always exciting to see small, young corals in high density, as it is an indication of healthy populations. (HR)

Rock samples can tell us a lot about the geologic origin of the seamount or ridge they were collected from and can help us figure out how a feature fits in with the puzzle of the Musicians Seamounts.

September 24
Rock samples can tell us a lot about the geologic origin of the seamount or ridge they were collected from. (HR)

So far during the expedition, we have had several “bonus” observations of water column fauna, like this jellyfish observed at Sibelius Seamount.

September 24
We have had several “bonus” observations of water column fauna, like this jellyfish at Sibelius Seamount. (HR)

One of the most abundant vertebrates on earth, Cyclothones were a common fauna observed during our midwater exploration in the Musicians Seamounts.

September 24
Cyclothones were a common fauna observed during our midwater exploration in the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

These two sea elephants were spotted on during our second full day of water column exploration.

September 24
These two sea elephants were spotted on during our second full day of water column exploration. (HR)

Observations of predation in the deep sea are often rare and always exciting for our team.

September 24
Observations of predation in the deep sea are often rare and always exciting for our team. (HR)

During our ROV dives in the Musicians Seamounts, we observed multiple instances of this once-thought-to-be rare jellyfish predating upon a coral. Here, the jellyfish are eating Iridogorgia polyps at Liszt Seamount.

September 24
During our dives, we observed multiple instances of this once-thought-to-be rare jellyfish predating upon a coral. (HR)

This new species of sponge has only ever been seen twice before in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands.

September 24
This new species of sponge has only ever been seen twice before in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. (HR)

A sea spider feeds on an anemone that had colonized a bamboo coral branch at Shostakovich Seamount.

September 24
A sea spider feeds on an anemone that had colonized a bamboo coral branch at Shostakovich Seamount. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer explores the edge of a sharp ridge feature at Mozart Seamount.

September 24
ROV Deep Discoverer explores the edge of a sharp ridge feature at Mozart Seamount. (HR)

Deep-sea corals and sponges provide habitat to a number of organisms.

September 24
Deep-sea corals and sponges provide habitat to a number of organisms. (HR)

Everyone loves a good squat lobster! This potentially new species was observed on a black coral at Liszt Seamount.

September 24
Everyone loves a good squat lobster! This potentially new species was observed on a black coral at Liszt Seamount. (HR)

Alepisaurus ferox, also known as the lancetfish.

September 23
Alepisaurus ferox, also known as the lancetfish. (HR)

This species of Anoplogaster, known as a fangtooth, spent some time considering what Deep Discoverer was doing down there

September 23
This species of Anoplogaster, known as a fangtooth, spent time considering what Deep Discoverer was doing. (HR)

This dark red species of Lampocteis is a lobate ctenophore nicknamed the samurai helmet jelly.

September 23
This dark red species of Lampocteis is a lobate ctenophore nicknamed the samurai helmet jelly. (HR)

This species of Solmissus, or dinner plate jelly, was seen during our last set of midwater transects of the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition.

September 23
This species of Solmissus, or dinner plate jelly, was seen during our last set of midwater transects of the expedition. (HR)

Solmandella, two sword jelly spotted in the water column during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition.

September 23
Solmandella, two sword jelly spotted in the water column during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition. (HR)

Halicreas minimum, the warty clubfoot jelly, shown here with an amphipod along for the ride.

September 23
Halicreas minimum, the warty clubfoot jelly, shown here with an amphipod along for the ride. (HR)

After seeing some squid ink in the water, we finally encountered this boarlet squid.

September 23
After seeing some squid ink in the water, we finally encountered this boarlet squid. (HR)

A prayid siphonophore was discovered with tentacles extended from the long siphosome ready to capture prey.

September 23
A prayid siphonophore was discovered with tentacles extended from the long siphosome ready to capture prey. (HR)

This sergestiid shrimp is an excellent example with its long antennae reaching out to detect movement.

September 23
This sergestiid shrimp has long antennae reaching out to detect movement. (HR)

Chaetognaths were extremely abundant on the midwater dives in the Musicians Seamounts region, inhabiting a broad depth range.

September 23
Arrowworms were extremely abundant on the midwater dives in the Musicians Seamounts region. (HR)

An oikopluerid, or larvacean inside its elaborately shaped gelatinous house.

September 23
An oikopluerid, or larvacean inside its elaborately shaped gelatinous house. (HR)

High-density coral community at Sibelius Seamount in the Musicians Seamounts. Areas like this with a large number of organisms will take a while to annotate, as every organism needs to be documented separately, and we saw hundreds, if not thousands!

September 21
High-density coral community at Sibelius Seamount in the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

View of remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer investigating a large primnoid coral colony.

September 21
View of ROV Deep Discoverer investigating a large primnoid coral colony. (HR)

After NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer and the remotely operated vehicles Seirios and Deep Discoverer collect video data from across the Pacific, video annotators at the University of Hawaii combine animal identifications and habitat observations using the Video Annotation and Reference System (VARS) software developed by Monterey Bay Aquarium and Research Institute (MBARI). These data will then be available in the NOAA Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Database.

September 21
Video annotation process from collection to incorporation in the NOAA Deep-Sea Coral Research and Technology Database. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer has been fortunate to work with many skilled and knowledgeable NOAA Corps officers

September 18
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer has been fortunate to have had many skilled and knowledgeable NOAA Corps officers on board. (HR)

LCDR Fionna Matheson plots fixes on the paper charts on the bridge of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 18
LCDR Fionna Matheson plots fixes on the paper charts on the bridge of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

ENS Anna Hallingstad scans the horizon from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 18
ENS Anna Hallingstad scans the horizon from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Ensign ENS Brianna Pacheco works on navigation systems on the bridge of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in preparation for an ROV dive.

September 18
Ensign ENS Brianna Pacheco works on navigation systems on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in preparation for an ROV dive. (HR)

Map of Wagner Seamount showing the location of our remotely operated vehicle dive.

September 16
Map of Wagner Seamount showing the location of our remotely operated vehicle dive. (HR)

Smooth lava flows like these tend to indicate rapid movement of lava as it erupts either due to erupting on a steep slope or the expulsion of lots of lava from a volcano in a short period of time.

September 16
Smooth lava flows like these tend to indicate rapid movement of lava as it erupts. (HR)

We had to sample this lava to help us learn more about this very rapidly erupting volcanic feature on Wagner Seamount.

September 16
We sampled this lava to help us learn more about this erupting volcanic feature on Wagner Seamount. (HR)

Large cology of Iridogorgia magisprialis, an octocoral in the family Chrysogorgiidae.

September 15
Large cology of Iridogorgia magisprialis, an octocoral in the family Chrysogorgiidae. (HR)

Dense and diverse coral community at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount with large Iridogoria sp. (center), bamboo coral (foreground and background), black coral (right), pink coral (right), and glass sponges (lower middle).

September 15
Dense and diverse coral community at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount. (HR)

Example of a habitat suitability model for deep-sea corals in the family Paragorgiidae (pictured top left) in the Main Hawaiian Islands Exclusive Economic Zone.

September 15
Example of a habitat suitability model for deep-sea corals in the family Paragorgiidae. (HR)

Beautiful “bamboo forest” of Isididae coral on an outcrop at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount.

September 15
Beautiful “bamboo forest” of Isididae coral on an outcrop at “Tropic of Cancer” Seamount. (HR)

This sea toad or coffinfish (Chaunacops species) was seen at a depth of about 3,148 meters (1.96 miles), during a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive at a seamount ridge, dubbed “Beach Ridge,” in the Musicians Seamount group northeast of Oʼahu, Hawaiian Islands.

September 12
This sea toad was seen during a dive at a seamount ridge, dubbed “Beach Ridge.” (HR)

September 12
This Commerson’s frogfish has its lure folded back along its head so that it cannot be seen. (HR)

A Chaunax umbrinus photographed during an Okeanos Explorer ROV dive on the southwest coast of Niʼihau, Hawaiʼi, between 312-538 meters (1024-1765 feet).

September 12
A Chaunax umbrinus photographed during an Okeanos Explorer dive on the southwest coast of Niʼihau, Hawaiʼi. (HR)

September 12
A Chaunacops coloratus photographed during a dive on a flat-topped seamount west of Wake Atoll in 2016. (HR)

This bright-red Chaunacops observed during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition differed from those usually seen by having a brighter color, larger cirri, and smaller or no prickles on its back.

September 12
This bright-red Chaunacops observed during the expedition differed from those usually seen. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer collects a sample of Anthomastus.

September 9
ROV Deep Discoverer collects a sample of Anthomastus. (HR)

colonies of Iridogorgia spotted on dive 2.

September 9
Colonies of Iridogorgia spotted on Dive 02. (HR)

A particularly adorable chaunax observed on dive 3.

September 9
A particularly adorable chaunax observed on Dive 03.

Deep sea coral and sponge communities at Beethoven Ridge.

September 9
Deep-sea coral and sponge communities at Beethoven Ridge. (HR)

Seiros just before launch on our first dive in the Musicians Seamounts.

September 9
Seiros just before launch on our first dive in the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer shortly before departing for the last expedition of NOAA’s Campaign to Address Pacific monument, Science, Technology, and Ocean NEeds (CAPSTONE).

September 9
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer shortly before departing for the last CAPSTONE expedition. (HR)

 

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Images (Background Essays)

During the expedition, NOAA’s ROV Deep Discoverer will be used to acquire high-definition visual data and collect limited samples in poorly explored areas near the boundaries of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument and in the Musicians Seamounts.

Mission Plan
Deep Discoverer will be used to acquire high-definition visual data and collect limited samples in poorly explored areas. (HR)

Map of the general expedition operating area. The yellow line is the rough cruise track through the Musicians Seamounts during the Deep-Sea Symphony expedition.

Mission Plan
Map of the general expedition operating area. The yellow line is the rough cruise track through the Musicians Seamounts. (HR)

Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC. Collaboration among different fields of study is easily fostered with so many scientists working together in one location.

Mission Plan
Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC. (HR)

Map detailing the names of the seamounts within the Musicians Seamounts group.

History
Map detailing the names of the seamounts within the Musicians Seamounts group. (HR)

The best example of a hotspot producing a line of volcanic islands is the Hawaiian hotspot. This drawing, from Thurman’s Introduction to Oceanography, illustrates how the Hawaiian chain formed as the Pacific tectonic plate moved over the hotspot.

History
The best example of a hotspot producing a line of volcanic islands is the Hawaiian hotspot. (HR)

Dr. Henry William Menard, Director of the U.S. Geological Survey from 1978 - 1981. He was credited with naming the Musicians Seamounts group in 1959.

History
Dr. Henry William Menard was credited with naming the Musicians Seamounts group in 1959. (HR)

High-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Biogeography
High-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (HR)

A representation of potential physical (current and depth) and biological (reproduction, larval behavior, settlement) forces that may influence dispersal, colonization, and genetic connectivity among deep-sea coral populations.

Biogeography
A representation of physical and biological forces that influence dispersal, colonization, and genetic connectivity among deep-sea coral populations. (HR)

A high-density coral community from Pioneer Bank in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Biogeography
High-density coral community in Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. (HR)

High-density coral community from Keahole Point on the Island of Hawaii in the Main Hawaiian Islands.

Biogeography
High-density coral community from Keahole Point on the Island of Hawaii in the Main Hawaiian Islands. (HR)

Oblique view of Murray Fracture Zone with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale.

Fracture Zones
Oblique view of Murray Fracture Zone with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale. (HR)

Oblique view of focused mapping area of Musicians Seamounts with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale.

Fracture Zones
Oblique view of mapping area of Musicians Seamounts with 100 nautical mile line drawn for scale. (HR)

 

 

 

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