Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin






Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are in the public domain and are free to use; please credit the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) | Images (Background Essays)

 


Highlight Videos

A primary goal of the expedition was to get a first look at the deep-sea habitats that exist throughout the Central Pacific Basin, with a particular focus on seamounts.

video Seamounts: A Geologic Puzzle
A primary goal of the expedition was to get a first look at deep-sea habitats throughout the Central Pacific Basin, with a particular focus on seamounts. (Video)

The expedition offered the first-ever glimpses at the deepwater habitats around Jarivs Island and were described by members of the science party as being 'amazing.'

video Discovering Deepwater Jarvis
The expedition offered the first-ever glimpses at the deepwater habitats around Jarivs Island. (Video)

Why are so many deep-sea corals so colorful in the completely dark environment of the deep ocean?

video A Dark World of Color
Why are so many deep-sea corals so colorful in the completely dark environment of the deep ocean? (Video)

During Dive 12, scientists observed several snails on crinoids. As this behavior had not been previously seen, it was unclear as to whether the snails were eating on waste from the crinoids, eating the crinoids themselves, or engaged in mating behavior.

video Dive 12: Poop, Prey, or Procreation?
Scientists observed several snails on crinoids, displaying behavior not previously observed. (Video)

The team got up close with this smalltooth sand tiger shark while exploring Kingman Cone.

video Dive 11: A Toothy Grin
The team got up close with this smalltooth sand tiger shark while exploring Kingman Cone. (Video)

Just before beginninng the return to the sea surface, after exploring the seafloor of South Palmyra Slope at a depth of ~500 meters, we saw this chaunax, sometimes called a coffinfish or toadfish, on the wall.

video Dive 10: Coffinfish
While exploring South Palmyra Slope, we saw this chaunax, sometimes called a coffinfish or toadfish, on the wall. (Video)

During Dive 09 on West Palmyra Seamount, scientists observed this unusual behavior of a sea star evidently eating a crinoid.

video Dive 09: An Easy Meal
During Dive 09, scientists observed this unusual behavior of a sea star evidently eating a crinoid. (Video)

This sea cucumber was seen gracefully swimming through the water column during exploration of the far western limits of the Clipperton Fracture Zone, as it crosses the Line Islands, at a depth of 4,500 meters (2.8 miles). While we often see these sea cucumbers on the seafloor, they do swim when they need to move to another location.

video Dive 08: Sea Cucumber Serenity
This sea cucumber was seen swimming through the water column during exploration of the Clipperton Fracture Zone. (Video)

This hatchetfish was imaged during Dive 07 to explore Whaley Seamount within the Jarvis Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

video Dive 07: Hatchetfish
This hatchetfish was imaged during exploration of "Whaley Seamount" within the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. (Video)

On May 6, after finishing exploration of the seafloor, we conducted a series of midwater transects from 1,400 to 300 meters (~4,595 to 985 feet).

video Dive 06: Midwater Journey
On May 6, we conducted a series of midwater transects from 1,400 to 300 meters depth. (Video)

A highlight of Dive 05 at Jarvis Island was observing a group of ophiuroids capture and eat a squid (Abralia sp.) that was swimming by.

video Dive 05: Brutal Brittle Stars
A highlight of Dive 05 was observing a group of ophiuroids capture and eat a squid that was swimming by. (Video)

This oreo fish, seen while exploring near Jarvis Island, gets its name not from the cookie, but from its scientific name, as it belongs to the family Oreosomatidae. While these fish appeared abundant at the dive site, they unknown from this part of the world before 2005.

video Dive 05: Oreo Fish
This oreo fish gets its common name not from the cookie, but from its scientific name, as it belongs to the family Oreosomatidae. (Video)

This giant bamboo coral was seen during Dive 04, at close to ~1,700 meters (~5,580 feet) depth on a seamount dubbed Kahalewai. The coral was almost as big as removely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer, making scientists speculate that the coral colony is likely hundreds of years old.

video Dive 04: Big Yellow Coral
This giant bamboo coral was seen at close to ~1,700 meters depth on a seamount dubbed "Kahalewai." (Video)

While exploring at a site informally called 'Te Kawhiti' on the northern edge of the Manihiki Plateau, scientists encountered a deep-sea coral forest. The hard seafloor at the site provided an ideal surface on which corals can grow and provide habitat for a range of animals, much like trees do in a forest on land.

video Dive 03: Deep Forest
The hard seafloor provides an ideal surface on which corals can grow and provide habitat for a range of animals. (Video)

This snail, in the family Margaritidae, was observed moving quickly across the seafloor during the dive at a site unofficially dubbed

video Dive 02: Margarita Snail
This snail was observed using its foot to quickly tumble along the seafloor. (Video)

During the first dive of the expedition, while exploring in the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa, the team encountered this colorful little octopus.

video Dive 01: Octopus
During the first dive of the expedition, the team encountered this colorful little octopus. (Video)

Prior to the start of the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition, while the ship was still in port in Pago Pago, American Samao, the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and partners conducted ship tours for local members of the community Through these tours and other outreach events, in just four short days, we reached close to 1,500 people, sharing the excitement of ocean exploration and our recent discoveries.

video Ship Tours
While the ship was in Pago Pago, American Samao, we conducted ship tours for local members of the community. (Video)

 

(top)

 


Images (Daily Updates)

The Mission Team of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer expedition, Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin.

May 19
The Mission Team of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer expedition, Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin. (HR)

Seamount we mapped on the return voyage to Honolulu. This

May 17-18
Seamount we mapped on the return voyage to Honolulu. This "Mountain in the Deep" rose approximately 3,000 meters from the seafloor. (HR)

The last sunset during the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition aboard NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em>.

May 17-18
The last sunset during the expedition aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Geology Lead Scientist, Dr. Del Bohnenstiehl (left), and Biology Science Lead, Dr. Scott France (middle), answer questions during the first-ever NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> live Facebook interaction.

May 16
Lead scientists answer questions during the first-ever NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer live Facebook interaction. (HR)

Photo of a rainbow, viewed from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

May 15
Photo of a rainbow, viewed from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The Mountains in the Deep expedition crew wish all of the mothers out there a very happy Mother's Day!

May 14
The Mountains in the Deep expedition crew wish all of the mothers out there a very happy Mother's Day! (HR)

We saw several growth stages of the sea pen, <em>Umbellula</em>, anchored in sediment patches.

May 13
We saw several growth stages of the sea pen, Umbellula, anchored in sediment patches. (HR)

We found this snail on a crinoid - notice the snail’s extended proboscis reaching into the upper surface of the crinoid calyx.

May 13
We found this snail on a crinoid – notice the snail's extended proboscis reaching into the upper surface of the crinoid calyx. (HR)

Pair of amphipods “fishing” from their perch on a red stalked crinoid.

May 13
Pair of amphipods "fishing" from their perch on a red stalked crinoid. (HR)

Hydromedusae jellyfish found in the water column.

May 13
Hydromedusae jellyfish found in the water column. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer on the bottom at Kingman Cone. The seafloor was manganese-encrusted carbonate with soft sediment between boulders and rock debris.

May 12
ROV Deep Discoverer on the bottom at Kingman Cone. (HR)

Venus flytrap anemone perched on a bamboo coral at Kingman Cone.

May 12
Venus flytrap anemone perched on a bamboo coral at Kingman Cone. (HR)

We were able to get some close-up imagery of this smalltooth sand tiger shark at ~1,025 meters (~3,360 feet) of depth on Kingman Cone.

May 12
We were able to get some close-up imagery of this smalltooth sand tiger shark at ~1,025 meters of depth on Kingman Cone. (HR)

Urchins were common on Dive 11 at Kingman Reef.

May 11
Urchins were common on Dive 11 at Kingman Reef. (HR)

During the early planning stage of the expedition, we received a request to help resupply the field station at Palmyra Atoll, as supplies are hard to come by on this remote atoll. Pictured here was an exciting encounter with a dolphin during our small boat transfer of supplies.

May 11
An exciting encounter with a dolphin during a small boat transfer of supplies to Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

A shrimp came out of a hole when Deep Discoverer arrived on the bottom.

May 11
A shrimp came out of a hole when Deep Discoverer arrived on the bottom. (HR)

This corallimorph was found at “West Palmyra Seamount” at approximately ~2,170 meters (7,120 feet) depth. Notice the white tips of its tentacles.

May 10
This corallimorph was found at "West Palmyra Seamount" at approximately ~2,170 meters depth. (HR)

Brittle stars clung to this zoanthid-covered bubblegum coral.

May 10
Brittle stars clung to this zoanthid-covered bubblegum coral. (HR)

This sea star (Solasteridae Lophaster sp.) was found feeding on a crinoid.

May 10
This sea star (Solasteridae Lophaster sp.) was found feeding on a crinoid. (HR)

A view of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer mapping track, showing some of the “Mountains in the Deep”.

May 9
A view of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer mapping track, showing some of the "Mountains in the Deep." (HR)

ROV <em>Deep Discoverer</em> found this <em>ipnops</em> on Dive 08 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition.

May 8
ROV Deep Discoverer found this ipnops on Dive 08 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition. (HR)

ROV <em>Deep Discoverer</em> explores the Clipperton Fracture Zone. This is the deepest dive on the expedition.

May 8
ROV Deep Discoverer explores the Clipperton Fracture Zone. This is the deepest dive on the expedition. (HR)

This Dana octopus squid followed the ROV down for a while. Notice the bioluminescent spotlights on the tips of two of its arms.

May 8
This Dana octopus squid followed the ROV down for a while. Notice the bioluminescent spotlights on the tips of two of its arms. (HR)

TFemale golden crab, heavy with purple eggs, found at about 1,015 meters (3,330 feet) on Dive 07, is covered in black spot disease.

May 7
Female golden crab, heavy with purple eggs, found at about 1,015 meters on Dive 07, is covered in black spot disease. (HR)

Batfish were common on the seamount dubbed “Whaley”.

May 7
Batfish were common on the seamount dubbed "Whaley." (HR)

This Pacific sleeper shark, seen at about 980 meters (3,215 feet) on Dive 07, came by to inspect the lights from remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer.

May 7
This Pacific sleeper shark came by to inspect the lights from Deep Discoverer during Dive 07. (HR)

We found this sponge attached to a rock in an unusual manner. Notice the base of the sponge looks like it has foot-like appendages.

May 6
We found this sponge attached to a rock in an unusual manner. Notice the base of the sponge looks like it has foot-like appendages. (HR)

This pelagic holothurian, or deep-sea swimming cucumber, is unusual in appearance when compared with other sea cucumbers because of its resemblance to a jellyfish. We found this one during midwater transects at ~1,400 meters (4,595 feet) depth. We have seen many of these sea cucumbers so far on this expedition.

May 6
This pelagic holothurian is unusual in appearance because of its resemblance to a jellyfish. (HR)

We found this hydromedusa, <em>Halicreatis</em>, at about 1,200 meters (3,935 feet) depth. The ends of its tentacles are packed with nematocysts (stinging cells), which make them appear especially bright.

May 6
We found this hydromedusa at about 1,200 meters depth. The ends of its tentacles are packed with nematocysts. (HR)

We found an unusual umbrella-shaped pedestal that was covered with corals and sponges towards the end of Dive 05 of the expedition.

May 5
We found an unusual umbrella-shaped pedestal that was covered with corals and sponges towards the end of Dive 05. (HR)

This sand tiger shark came by to check out remotely operated vehicle <em>Deep Discoverer</em> during the fifth dive of the expedition.

May 5
This sand tiger shark came by to check out Deep Discoverer during the fifth dive of the expedition. (HR)

We saw an octopus for Octopus Friday on Dive 05 of the expedition.

May 5
We saw an octopus for Octopus Friday on Dive 05 of the expedition. (HR)

The round purple object on this bubblegum coral is a dumbo octopus egg.

May 4
The round purple object on this bubblegum coral is a dumbo octopus egg. (HR)

This giant bamboo coral was seen at close to ~1,700 meters (~5,580 feet) depth on the seamount dubbed

May 4
This giant bamboo coral was seen at close to ~1,700 meters depth on the seamount dubbed "Kahalewai." (HR)

A previously unmapped seamount we are calling “Kahalewai”. This seamount has four ridges that radiate outward from the center.

May 3
A previously unmapped seamount that has four ridges that radiate outward from the center. (HR)

This ~4,200-meter (~13,800-foot) high seamount we are calling Kahalewai was almost 1,000 meters taller than previously thought.

May 3
This ~4,200-meter high seamount was almost 1,000 meters taller than previously thought. (HR)

This cusk eel was found at approximately 2,175 meters (7,135 feet) during the third dive of the expedition.

May 2
This cusk eel was found at approximately 2,175 meters during the third dive of the expedition. (HR)

Several different vibrantly colored animals can be seen in this image, taken at approximately 2,240 meters (7,350 feet).

May 2
Several different vibrantly colored animals can be seen in this image, taken at approximately 2,240 meters. (HR)

Te Kawhiti o Maui Potiki held a veritable coral forest that extended all the way to the high point of the ridge.

May 2
"Te Kawhiti o Maui Potiki" held a veritable coral forest that extended all the way to the high point of the ridge. (HR)

This pelagic sea cucumber (Holothuria) was seen on a midwater transect at about 1,200 meters (3,940 feet) during Dive 03 of the expedition.

May 2
This pelagic sea cucumber was seen on a midwater transect at about 1,200 meters during Dive 03 of the expedition. (HR)

This saddle-like feature was mapped on May 1 between a unnamed seamount and ridge, just north of the Cook Islands.

May 1
This saddle-like feature was mapped on May 1 between a unnamed seamount and ridge, just north of the Cook Islands. (HR)

Altimetry data informed us that this ridge feature existed and we selected it as a target for high-resolution bathymetric mapping. Much to our surprise, the ridge turned out to be over a full kilometer higher than previously thought.

May 1
Altimetry data informed us that this ridge feature existed and we selected it as a target for high-resolution bathymetric mapping. (HR)

Deep Discoverer grabs a manganese-crusted rock sample near a brisingid sea star at about 2,400 meters depth during Dive 02 of the expedition. The dive site was called Te Tukunga o Fakahotu and was located just north of the Manihiki Plateau, near the Cook Islands.

April 30
Deep Discoverer grabs a manganese-crusted rock sample near a brisingid sea star at 2,400 meters depth during Dive 02. (HR)

Members of the on-ship science team prepare a sample in the wet lab aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. This manganese-crusted rock was collected during the second dive of the expedition.

April 30
Members of the on-ship science team prepare a sample in the wet lab. This manganese-crusted rock was collected during Dive 02. (HR)

This image, from data collected during the CAPSTONE Telepresence Mapping in Pacific Marine Protected Areas expedition, shows a seamount that was once volcanically active.

April 29
This image shows a seamount that was once volcanically active. (HR)

The NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> mapping team hard at work in the control room. During the 60+ hours of transit, the ship is continuously collecting data with three different types of sonar.

April 28
The NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer mapping team hard at work in the control room. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer observes a cliff that marks the edge of a coral platform in American Samoa.

April 27
ROV Deep Discoverer observes a cliff that marks the edge of a coral platform in American Samoa. (HR)

A chirostylid crab, a type of squat lobster, was seen crawling on a gorgonian seafan (possibly Paracis sp.).

April 27
A chirostylid crab, a type of squat lobster, was seen crawling on a gorgonian seafan. (HR)

This colorful Cephalopholis grouper (also called a garish hind, goldbar grouper, garish rockcod, or Japanese cod - although it is not related to cods) was seen towards the end of Dive 01 of Mountains in the Deep at the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa.

April 27
Cephalopholis grouper was seen towards the end of Dive 01 at the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. (HR)

 

 

 

(top)

 


Images (Mission Logs)

Infographic summarizing accomplishments from the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition.

Expedition Summary
Infographic summarizing accomplishments from the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition.

Overview map showing seafloor bathymetry collected and ROV dives conducted during the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition.

Expedition Summary
Overview map showing seafloor bathymetry collected and ROV dives conducted during the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition.

Neah Baechler and Mike White, Seafloor Mapping, NOAA

May 17
Neah Baechler and Mike White, Seafloor Mapping, NOAA.

Caitlin Bailey, Videographer, Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration (GFOE)

May 17
Caitlin Bailey, Videographer, Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration (GFOE). (HR)

Kasey Cantwell, Expedition Coordinator, NOAA.

May 17
Kasey Cantwell, Expedition Coordinator, NOAA.

LT Aaron Colohan, Operations Officer, NOAA

May 17
LT Aaron Colohan, Operations Officer, NOAA. (HR)

Richard Conway, Electronic Technician, NOAA

May 17
Richard Conway, Electronic Technician, NOAA.

Jerrod Hozendorf, Chief Boatswain, NOAA.

May 17
Jerrod Hozendorf, Chief Boatswain, NOAA. (HR)

Bob Knott, Video Engineer, GFOE.

May 17
Bob Knott, Video Engineer, GFOE.

LCDR Fionna Matheson, Executive Officer, NOAA.

May 17
LCDR Fionna Matheson, Executive Officer, NOAA.

Amanda Netburn, Sample Data Manager/Water Column Lead Scientist, CIOERT-FAU/NOAA.

May 17
Amanda Netburn, Sample Data Manager/Water Column Lead Scientist, CIOERT-FAU/NOAA. (HR)

Michael Sapien, Chief Steward, NOAA

May 17
Michael Sapien, Chief Steward, NOAA.

Warren Taylor, Engineer, NOAA.

May 17
Warren Taylor, Engineer, NOAA.

Levi Unema, ROV Engineer, GFOE.

May 17
Levi Unema, ROV Engineer, GFOE. (HR)

On Dive 03, we found a veritable coral forest. The colors on this dive were phenomenal. In the foreground, the large polyps of an Anthomastus contrast with a yellow crinoid attached to a pink precious coral.

May 16
In the foreground, the large polyps of an Anthomastus contrast with a yellow crinoid attached to a pink precious coral. (HR)

These bright purple octocorals from Dive 04 grow like ribbons upon the rock as opposed to branching colonies.

May 16
These bright purple octocorals from Dive 04 grow like ribbons upon the rock as opposed to branching colonies. (HR)

This large, vibrantly yellow bamboo coral seen on Dive 04 was nearly equal in size to ROV Deep Discoverer.

May 16
This large, vibrantly yellow bamboo coral was nearly equal in size to ROV Deep Discoverer. (HR)

Seen on Dive 10, this Swiftia sea fan has polyps of a different color than the branches. Notice the soft tissue is a bright yellow and the skeletal features are a bright red. Brittle stars and a crab can also be seen in this image.

May 16
This Swiftia sea fan has polyps of a different color than the branches. Notice the soft tissue is a bright yellow and the skeletal features are a bright red. (HR)

On Dive 11, we found this deep purple Victorgorgia next to a yellow Acanthogorgia. Pink brittle star arms can be seen wrapped in the branches.

May 16
On Dive 11, we found this deep purple Victorgorgia next to a yellow Acanthogorgia. (HR)

The subtle pink of the mouths of these bamboo coral polyps contrast with the white of the polyp body and the bright red of the Asteronyx brittle star.

May 16
The subtle pink of the mouths of these bamboo coral polyps contrast with the white of the polyp body and the bright red brittle star. (HR)

The women of the deck department on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. A squall has passed and left a rainbow behind.

May 15
The women of the deck department on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Nicole Turpin (left) and Lindsey Houska (right) always come to work with a smile.

May 15
Nicole Turpin and Lindsey Houska always come to work with a smile. (HR)

Nicole Turpin recovering the ROVs at night on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

May 15
Nicole Turpin recovering the ROVs at night on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Lindsey Houska deftly secures camera sled Seirios on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

May 15
Lindsey Houska deftly secures camera sled Seirios on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer at sunrise.

May 14
The bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer at sunrise. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

May 14
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The Hawaiian canoe Hōkūleʻa, a traditional-style double-hulled vessel made out of modern materials.

May 14
The Hawaiian canoe Hōkūleʻa, a traditional-style double-hulled vessel made out of modern materials. (HR)

Nainoa Thompson using traditional navigation techniques aboard Hōkūleʻa.

May 14
Nainoa Thompson using traditional navigation techniques aboard Hōkūleʻa. (HR)

A brown noddy has plucked what appears to be a piece of algae from the water just offshore of Palmyra Atoll.

May 13
A brown noddy has plucked what appears to be a piece of algae from the water just offshore of Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

A trio of Masked Boobies passes by the ship off Jarvis Island.

May 13
A trio of Masked Boobies passes by the ship off Jarvis Island. (HR)

While diving off Palmyra Atoll, this white tern, a.k.a. fairy tern, made a flyby of the ship.

May 13
While diving off Palmyra Atoll, this white tern made a flyby of the ship. (HR)

Lesser Frigatebird.

May 13
Lesser Frigatebird. (HR)

A pair of juvenile Brown Boobies landed on a mast on the bow and warded off others who wanted the perch.

May 13
A pair of juvenile Brown Boobies landed on a mast on the bow and warded off others who wanted the perch. (HR)

Red-footed Booby.

May 13
Red-footed Booby. (HR)

A flock of noddies resting on the sea surface offshore of Palmyra Atoll. We saw hundreds of noddies flying just above the water surface, occasionally dipping for a meal, before this rest period.

May 13
A flock of noddies resting on the sea surface offshore of Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

The Dynamic Position controls are on the bridge on NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em>.

May 12
The Dynamic Position controls are on the bridge on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The propellers on NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em>.

May 12
The propellers on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

This bow thruster retracts into the ship. Notice the plating on the bottom, it is representative of the hull of the ship. We can either lower it or operate it inside the hull.

May 12
This bow thruster retracts into the ship. Notice the plating on the bottom, it is representative of the hull of the ship. (HR)

A tight zoom of a basket star on a primnoid coral taken on Dive 11 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition.

May 12
A tight zoom of a basket star on a primnoid coral taken on Dive 11 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition. (HR)

ROV <em>Seirios</em>, the other half of the NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> dual-body system.

May 12
ROV Seirios, the other half of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer dual-body system. (HR)

ROV <em>Deep Discoverer</em> on a steep wall at the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa.

May 12
ROV Deep Discoverer on a steep wall at the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. (HR)

A rattail (Coryphaenoides sp.) swims over a heavily sedimented, soft bottom during Dive 08 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition.

May 11
A rattail swims over a heavily sedimented, soft bottom during Dive 08 of the expedition. (HR)

This image from Dive 04 of the expedition, shows a hard substrate-dominated seafloor with a variety of sessile filter feeders (stalked crinoids, glass sponge, barnacles), but no fishes.

May 11
This image from Dive 04 of the expedition, shows a hard substrate-dominated seafloor with a variety of sessile filter feeders, but no fishes. (HR)

This is an echogram showing acoustic backscatter data from the EK60 aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

May 11
This is an echogram showing acoustic backscatter data from the EK60 aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

This grideye fish (Ipnops meadi), seen on Dive 08 of the expedition, has highly modified, platelike eyes.

May 10
This grideye fish (Ipnops meadi) has highly modified, platelike eyes. (HR)

This cusk eel (Bassozetus sp.), seen on Dive 08 of the expedition, was one of the fish we had expected to see during this dive since it is also common further east in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone.

May 10
This cusk eel was one of the fish we had expected to see since it is also common further east in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone. (HR)

This injured cusk eel (subfamily Neobythitinae, Leucicorus), seen on Dive 08 of the expedition, has a dark head and a lighter, mottled body.

May 10
This injured cusk eel (subfamily Neobythitinae, Leucicorus) has a dark head and a lighter, mottled body. (HR)

This deep-sea lizardfish (Bathysaurus mollis), seen on Dive 08 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition, is a top predator on the abyssal plains.

May 10
This deep-sea lizardfish (Bathysaurus mollis)is a top predator on the abyssal plains. (HR)

This unknown cusk eel (family Ophidiidae), seen on Dive 08 of the expedition, also displays a bicolor pigmentation pattern with a dark head and a light body.

May 10
This unknown cusk eel (family Ophidiidae) also displays a bicolor pigmentation pattern with a dark head and a light body. (HR)

It seems that this jellyfish can really pack a punch – the thick bright ends of its tentacles are where the nematocysts (stinging cells) are especially dense.

May 9
It seems that this jellyfish can really pack a punch – the thick bright ends of its tentacles are where the nematocysts are especially dense. (HR)

Long tentacles, like on this anthomedusa jellyfish, are used to sting and capture small prey items.

May 9
Long tentacles, like on this anthomedusa jellyfish, are used to sting and capture small prey items. (HR)

Another anthomedusa jellyfish.

May 9
Another anthomedusa jellyfish. (HR)

Narcomedusa with tentacles extended.

May 9
Narcomedusa with tentacles extended. (HR)

An echogram, showing acoustic backscatter.

May 9
An echogram, showing acoustic backscatter.

A physonect siphonophore.

May 9
A physonect siphonophore. (HR)

Red-footed Booby.

May 9
A cydippid ctenophore (comb jelly). (HR)

We were very excited to see this doliolid in the water column. Doliolids are a type of tunicate, related to salps and sea squirts.

May 9
We were very excited to see this doliolid in the water column. Doliolids are a type of tunicate. (HR)

A goniasterid in the genus Circeaster feeding on a primnoid coral.

May 8
A goniasterid in the genus Circeaster feeding on a primnoid coral. (HR)

A seastar in the family Goniasteridae, genus Hippasteria, with an arm menacing this tiny little octocoral off to the side at Whaley Seamount.

May 8
A sea star with an arm menacing this tiny little octocoral off to the side. (HR)

Zoroaster on Whaley seamount, partially buried in the sediment.

May 8
Zoroaster on "Whaley" seamount, partially buried in the sediment. (HR)

I performed a study of the gut contents based on specimens of these animals in the National Museum of Natural History several years ago.

May 8
I performed a study of the gut contents based on specimens of these animals in the National Museum of Natural History. (HR)

These sea stars have extremely elongate spines along their arms, as seen in this one individual from Kahalewai seamount.

May 8
These sea stars have extremely elongate spines along their arms, as seen in this one from Kahalewai seamount. (HR)

Brisingid at Kahalewai seamount, Dive 04 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition.

May 8
Brisingid at "Kahalewai" seamount, Dive 04 of the Mountains in the Deep expedition. (HR)

Hundreds of brittle stars occupy a very yellow glass sponge.

May 8
Hundreds of brittle stars occupy a very yellow glass sponge. (HR)

On Kahalewai Seamount, hundreds of brittle stars occupy a yellow glass sponge.

May 8
On "Kahalewai" Seamount, hundreds of brittle stars occupy a yellow glass sponge. (HR)

A goniasterid sea star, possibly <em>Mediaster</em> sp.,  at 875 meters (2,870 feet) on Whaley Seamount.

May 8
A goniasterid sea star at 875 meters on "Whaley" Seamount. (HR)

This holothurian, in the family Laetmogonidae, was found on Dive 02 of the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition, at 2,495 meters (8,185 feet) depth. Notice the gut full of yellow sediment visible through its elongated translucent purple body.

May 7
This holothurian was found on Dive 02, at 2,495 meters depth. Notice the gut full of yellow sediment. (HR)

This light pink holothurian, which could be from the family Synallactidae and possibly genus <em>Bathyplotes</em>, was found at a depth of 2,480 meters (8,136 feet) on Dive 02 of the expedition.

May 7
This light pink holothurian was found at a depth of 2,480 meters on Dive 02 of the expedition. (HR)

This bright pink holothurian, which could be from the family Synallactidae and possibly genus <em>Bathyplotes</em>, was found at a depth of 2,478 meters (8,130 feet) on Dive 02 of the expedition.

May 7
This bright pink holothurian was found at a depth of 2,478 meters (8,130 feet) on Dive 02 of the expedition. (HR)

This holothurian, possibly from the family Synallactidae, was found on Dive 04 of the expedition at approximately 1,680 meters (5,510 feet). Here you can clearly see its mouth, a rare sighting as these are usually on the seafloor sucking up sediment.

May 7
This holothurian was found on Dive 04 of the expedition at approximately 1,680 meters. (HR)

This holothurian from the Synallactidae family was spotted on Whaley Seamount at 1,040 meters (~3,410 feet) of depth.

May 7
This holothurian from the Synallactidae family was spotted on "Whaley" Seamount at 1,040 meters of depth. (HR)

This holothurian is also from the family Synallactidae, likely from the genus Synallactes, and was seen at 1,930 meters.

May 7
This holothurian is also from the family Synallactidae, likely from the genus Synallactes, and was seen at 1,930 meters. (HR)

A close-up image of the holothurian (family Psolidae) that we collected on Dive 05 of the expedition.

May 7
A close-up image of the holothurian that we collected on Dive 05 of the expedition. (HR)

Cute elpidiid holothurian with an intestine full of sediment

May 7
Cute elpidiid holothurian with an intestine full of sediment. (HR)

Crinoids were very common throughout Dive 05, and they were often found in high densities, as is shown here.

May 6
Crinoids were very common throughout Dive 05, and they were often found in high densities, as is shown here. (HR)

For a distance of about 100 meters during our dive at Jarvis Island, as far as remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer's light pool reached, the bottom was covered in primnoid corals and sea urchins.

May 6
For part of Jarvis Island dive, as far as Deep Discoverer's light pool reached, the bottom was covered in corals and sea urchins. (HR)

One of the most exciting observations of the dive was this unusual umbrella-shaped pillar feature covered in deep-sea corals and sponges.

May 6
An exciting observation of the dive was this unusual umbrella-shaped pillar feature covered in deep-sea corals and sponges. (HR)

An unusual seastar with no arms (likely Tremaster mirabilis)– we saw several of these as we climbed upslope during Dive 05.

May 6
An unusual seastar with no arms – we saw several of these as we climbed upslope during Dive 05. (HR)

Solitary hydroids are fairly common observations during NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer dives, but there was much discussion amongst our science team as to why these three individuals appear to share a base.

May 6
Solitary hydroids are fairly common during dives, but there was much discussion aas to why these three appear to share a base. (HR)

This pelagic holothurian is typically seen in the water column, but we saw several on the seafloor, seemingly snagged on the coral rubble.

May 6
This pelagic holothurian is typically seen in the water column, but we saw several on the seafloor, snagged on coral rubble. (HR)

A duckbill eel was observed early in our dive on Jarvis Island.

May 6
A duckbill eel was observed early in our dive on Jarvis Island. (HR)

We observed goosefish, like the one pictured here, at a variety of depths throughout our dive at Jarvis Island.

May 6
We observed goosefish at a variety of depths throughout our dive at Jarvis Island. (HR)

Roughy with an isopod parasite.

May 6
Roughy with an isopod parasite. (HR)

Sharks are always fun to observe. Here, ROV Deep Discoverer is pictured with a sand tiger shark. The black dots on the seafloor are all sea urchins, another high-density community observed during Dive 05.

May 6
Deep Discoverer with a sand tiger shark. The "black dots" on the seafloor are sea urchins. (HR)

Two of the school of +20 Randall's snappers hang out under an overhang covered in coral and sponges.

May 6
Two of the school of +20 Randall's snappers hang out under an overhang covered in coral and sponges. (HR)

This golden crab, seen under a rock overhang during the dive at Jarvis Island, is carrying a large egg mass under her abdomen.

May 6
This golden crab, seen under a rock overhang during the dive at Jarvis Island, is carrying a large egg mass under her abdomen. (HR)

Pacific marine national monuments, along with U.S. Pacific Islands and associated Exclusive Economic Zones.

May 5
Pacific marine national monuments, along with U.S. Pacific Islands and associated Exclusive Economic Zones. (HR)

The slopes of Jarvis Island, Palmyra Atoll, and Kingman Reef were first surveyed in 2005 by the University of Hawaiʻi and NOAA's Hawaiʻi Undersea Research Laboratory's <em>Pisces IV</em> and <em>V</em> submersibles.

May 5
The slopes of Jarvis Island, Palmyra Atoll, and Kingman Reef were first surveyed in 2005 by the Pisces IV and V. (HR)

A Pisces submersible moves along the sheer cliff-face at Jarvis Island, as photographed by the other Pisces submersible.

May 5
A Pisces submersible moves along the cliff-face at Jarvis Island, as seen from the other Pisces submersible. (HR)

The submerged, eroded, ancient reef of these islands had an intimidating topography at many sites – with overhanging ledges, box canyons, ridges, huge domes.

May 5
The submerged, eroded, ancient reef of these islands had an intimidating topography at many sites. (HR)

Large coral fans, like this bamboo coral were abundant on current-swept ridges in deep waters of the Line Islands.

May 5
Large coral fans, like this bamboo coral were abundant on current-swept ridges in deep waters of the Line Islands. (HR)

Thousands of small deep-water scorpionfish (Setarches guentheri) were seen resting on sediments of low-gradient slopes or the tops of rock domes in the U.S. Line Islands.

May 5
Thousands of scorpionfish were seen resting on sediments of slopes or the tops of rock domes in the U.S. Line Islands. (HR)

This map shows the distribution of roughies as known to 1996 with small squares.

May 5
Map showing the distribution of roughies as known in 1996 with small squares. (HR)

Since the 2005 exploration in the Line Islands, roughies have been seen at seamounts near Johnston Atoll, the Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Tokelau, and the Phoenix Islands during NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer expeditions.

May 5
Since the 2005 exploration in the Line Islands, roughies have been seen at Pacific seamounts during Okeanos expeditions. (HR)

Torpedo ray seen during submersible surveys in 2005 at the U.S. Line Islands. This fish has not been seen again since.

May 5
Torpedo ray seen during submersible surveys in 2005 at the U.S. Line Islands. This fish has not been seen again since. (HR)

The oreo dory, first seen during 2005 exploration in the Line Islands, and seen again during NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer ROV surveys at other central Pacific locations.

May 5
The oreo dory, first seen during 2005 exploration in the Line Islands, and seen again during Okeanos Explorer ROV surveys at other central Pacific locations. (HR)

Striped eel, first seen in 2005 and later seen during a 2017 Okeanos Explorer dive within the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

May 5
Striped eel, first seen in 2005 and later seen during a 2017 Okeanos Explorer dive within the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. (HR)

Sponge with crinoids, seen during Dive 03 of the expedition.

May 4
Sponge with crinoids, seen during Dive 03 of the expedition. (HR)

Rounded black pieces of manganese-encrusted basaltic rubble with white carbonate sand between the boulders seen on Dive 02.

May 4
Rounded black pieces of manganese-encrusted basaltic rubble with white carbonate sand between the boulders seen on Dive 02. (HR)

Thicket of bamboo corals on a rock ridge with rippled carbonate sand on both sides. The corals are habitat for crinoids, brittle stars, and squat lobster.

May 4
Thicket of bamboo corals on a rock ridge with rippled carbonate sand on both sides. (HR)

The substrate at the Dive 03 site was mostly dark, manganese-crusted rock with some soft sediment.

May 4
The substrate at the Dive 03 site was mostly dark, manganese-crusted rock with some soft sediment. (HR)

This microscope image from Dive 03 shows that the soft sediment we collected was composed of foraminifera.

May 4
This microscope image from Dive 03 shows that the soft sediment we collected was composed of foraminifera. (HR)

Large bamboo corals (subfamily Keratoisidinae), with feather stars and brittle stars attached to their branches, were very common throughout Dive 03.

May 4
Large bamboo corals with feather stars and brittle stars attached to their branches were very common throughout Dive 03. (HR)

A close-up view of a bamboo coral, with a small king crab (genus Paralomis) hanging on.

May 4
A close-up view of a bamboo coral, with a small king crab hanging on. (HR)

The sponge (Walteria sp.) with a feather star attached.

May 4
The sponge (Walteria sp.) with a feather star attached. (HR)

The Science Team aboard NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> (Del, Kasey, Scott, and Mike, from left to right) prepares for the Reddit

May 3
The Science Team aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer prepares for the Reddit "Ask Me Anything" session. (HR)

Del Bohnenstiehl is the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition geology science lead. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Geospatial Analytics at North Carolina State University.

May 2
Del Bohnenstiehl is the expedition geology science lead. He is an Associate Professor and a Faculty Fellow at North Carolina State University. (HR)

Scott C. France is the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition biology science lead. He is an Associate Professor of Biology at the Department of Biology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

May 2
Scott C. France is the expedition biology science lead. He is a Professor at the Department of Biology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. (HR)

Amanda Netburn is the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition sample data manager. She has a dual position with the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research & Technology (CIOERT) at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute and NOAA Office Ocean Exploration and Research, where she leads the effort to develop water column priorities and sampling protocols within the exploration context.

May 2
Amanda Netburn is the expedition sample data manager. She leads office efforts to develop exploration water column priorities and sampling protocols. (HR)

Kasey Cantwell is the expedition coordinator for the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition. She is a Field Operations Specialist with NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

May 2
Kasey Cantwell is the expedition coordinator and a Field Operations Specialist with NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research. (HR)

Mike White is the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition mapping lead. He is a Physical Scientist with NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

May 2
Mike White is the expedition mapping lead. He is a Physical Scientist with NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research. (HR)

Tucking a paper towel into a cup before its decent helps to ensure that it doesn't crumple in under pressure.

May 1
Tucking a paper towel into a cup before its decent helps to ensure that it doesn't crumple in under pressure. (HR)

The shrunken cups designed by the children E Malama I Na Keiki O Lanai Pre School in Lanai City, Hawaii, after visiting 2,500 meters deep attached to the ROV Seirios on Dive 02 of the expedition.

May 1
The shrunken cups designed by the children E Malama I Na Keiki O Lanai Pre School in Lanai City, Hawaii, after visiting 2,500 meters deep. (HR)

Stryofoam cups designed by the children E Malama I Na Keiki O Lanai Pre School in Lanai City, Hawaii, before being sent down to a depth of 2,500 meters during the second dive of this expedition.

May 1
Stryofoam cups designed by the children E Malama I Na Keiki O Lanai Pre School in Lanai City, Hawaii, before being sent down to a depth of 2,500 meters. (HR)

Sunlight does not penetrate the deep sea. Remotely operated vehicles <em>Deep Discoverer</em> (pictured here, at ~360 meters depth at the Aunuʻu Unit of National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa) and <em>Seirios</em> have multiple lights – over 40 lights between the two robots – that allow researchers to see in the deep ocean.

April 30
Sunlight does not penetrate the deep sea. ROVs have that allow researchers to see in the deep ocean. (HR)

This duckbill fish (family Percophidae) was found at approximately ~275 meters depth. The golden-yellow spots identify the fish as potentially <em>Chrionema chryseres</em>. Its large eyes suggest that it is a visual predator.

April 30
This duckbill fish was found at approximately ~275 meters depth. Its large eyes suggest that it is a visual predator. (HR)

The ocean is divided into three zones based on depth and light level.

April 30
The ocean is divided into three zones based on depth and light level. (HR)

TNOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> pulls out of Pago Pago, American Samoa and heads to the first dive site in the Aunuʻu Unit of the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa.

April 27
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls out of Pago Pago, American Samoa and heads to the first dive site. (HR)

 Expedition Coordinator, Kasey Cantwell, prepares to board NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to embark on the Mountains in the Deep: Exploring the Central Pacific Basin expedition.

April 27
Expedition Coordinator Kasey Cantwell prepares to board the ship to embark on the expedition. (HR)

Levi Unema and Sean Kennison, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) engineers with the Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration, teach students in American Samoa about ROV Deep Discoverer during a ship tour.

April 27
Levi Unema and Sean Kennison teach students in American Samoa about ROV Deep Discoverer during a ship tour. (HR)

Science leads, Scott France and Del Bohnenstiehl, leading a ship tour in control room aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

April 27
Science leads Scott France and Del Bohnenstiehl lead a ship tour in the Okeanos Explorer's control room. (HR)

Engaging with local students is a key component of Okeanos Explorer missions. In this photo, Expedition Coordinator Kasey Cantwell teaches a group of students from American Samoa about the bridge of the ship during a tour.

April 27
Kasey Cantwell teaches a group of students about the bridge of the ship during a tour. (HR)

 Students from American Samoa tour NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Seen on the far right of the second row is Expedition Coordinator Kasey Cantwell and on the far right of the last row is the expedition mapping lead, Mike White.

April 27
Students from American Samoa tour NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Seirios is on deck and ready for Dive 01 of the expedition. Seirios and Deep Discoverer together make up the dual-body ROV system on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

April 27
ROV Seirios is on deck and ready for Dive 01 of the expedition. (HR)

(top)

 


Images (Background Essays)

Map of the general expedition operating area. The red line is the rough cruise track from American Samoa to Honolulu during the expedition.

Mission Plan
Map of the general expedition operating area. The red line is the rough cruise track from American Samoa to Honolulu during the expedition. (HR)

In the deep sea, corals provide habitat for many organisms.

Mission Plan
In the deep sea, corals provide habitat for many organisms. (HR)

In the Jarvis Unit of PRIMNM, multibeam data revealed an approximate 1,700 meter seamount height difference when compared to previous satellite altimetry.

Mission Plan
In the Jarvis Unit of PRIMNM, newly collected Okeanos multibeam data revealed an approximate 1,700 meter seamount height difference when compared to previous satellite altimetry. (HR)

Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC.

Mission Plan
Scientists participating at the University of Hawaii ECC. (HR)

Brittle stars seen living in the branches of coral during exploration at 1,800 meters depth on Titov Seamount within the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

Biological Unknowns
Brittle stars seen living in the branches of coral during exploration of Titov Seamount. (HR)

High-profile rock features found on seamounts provide ideal surfaces for corals to colonize.

Biological Unknowns
High-profile rock features found on seamounts provide ideal surfaces for corals to colonize. (HR)

Map compiled in 2011 from ~1,000 museum records of samples of octocorals collected deeper than 50 meters (red dots). The map shows that most samples come from near the coasts of the continents or around the Hawaiian Islands and New Zealand; there is a major gap in sampling of the Central Pacific Basin. Data compiled by Eric Pante; map by Les Watling.

Biological Unknowns
Map compiled from ~1,000 museum records of samples of octocorals collected deeper than 50 meters. (HR)

Regional view of western Pacific bathymetry showing distribution of linear volcanic chains.

Volcanoes of Western Pacific
Regional view of western Pacific bathymetry showing distribution of linear volcanic chains. (HR)

Hotspot model for linear island formation.

Volcanoes of Western Pacific
Hotspot model for linear island formation. (HR)

Extension and cracking of the oceanic plate in response to thermal or tectonic stresses provides a pathway for magma, leading to the formation of a linear volcanic chain.

Volcanoes of Western Pacific
Extension and cracking of the oceanic plate in response to thermal or tectonic stresses provides a pathway for magma. (HR)

Small-scale sub-lithospheric convection develops due to instabilities in the thermal boundary layer as the plate cools.

Volcanoes of Western Pacific
Small-scale sub-lithospheric convection develops due to instabilities in the thermal boundary layer as the plate cools. (HR)

Graduates and students of Kamehameha School onboard the Itasca, 4th expedition, January 1936.

Hui Panalāʻau Story
Graduates and students of Kamehameha School onboard the Itasca, 4th expedition, January 1936. (HR)

Hawaiian Colonists—American Citizens. Kamehameha School Graduates.

Hui Panalāʻau Story
"Hawaiian Colonists—American Citizens. Kamehameha School Graduates." (HR)

Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is home to some of the most pristine coral reefs in the world.

Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef
Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is home to some of the most pristine coral reefs in the world. (HR)

The iron that leached into the environment from this shipwreck on Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef had encouraged the growth of an invasive green algae.

Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef
The iron that leached from this shipwreck encouraged growth of an invasive green algae. (HR)

An aerial view of Palmyra from the east end.

Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef
An aerial view of Palmyra from the east end. (HR)

A sooty tern colony on Palmyra Atoll.

Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef
A sooty tern colony on Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

Whale shark in the Ningaloo Marine Park near Exmouth.

Big Ocean Network
Whale shark in the Ningaloo Marine Park near Exmouth. (HR)

Le Parc Naturel De La Mer De Corail (Natural Park of The Coral Sea), France.

Big Ocean Network
Le Parc Naturel De La Mer De Corail (Natural Park of The Coral Sea), France. (HR)

Phoenix Islands Protected Area and World Heritage Site, Kiribati.

Big Ocean Network
Phoenix Islands Protected Area and World Heritage Site, Kiribati.

A sooty tern colony on Palmyra Atoll.

Palmyra Atoll and Kingman Reef
A sooty tern colony on Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

Marae Moana, Cook Islands Marine Park.

Big Ocean Network
Marae Moana, Cook Islands Marine Park.

 

 

 

 

Sign up for the Ocean Explorer Email Update List.

Back to Top