Exploring Puerto Rico’s Seamounts, Trenches, & Troughs





Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos taken during the Océano Profundo 2015: Exploring Puerto Rico’s Seamounts, Trenches, and Troughs expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information. For video, multiple video formats are available on the linked pages.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Video Clips | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) |
Images (Background Essays)

 


Dive Highlight Videos

Highlights video from Dive 12

video April 29: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 12 on Whiting Seamount (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 11

video April 28: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 11 on Exocet Seamount, northwest of St. Croix (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 10

video April 27: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 10 to explore two unknown sonar anomalies just south of St. Croix (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 9

video April 26: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 9, which marked Deep Discoverer's first time reaching 6,000 meters depth (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 8

video April 25: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 8, which was an engineering dive (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 7

video April 16: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 7 to explore the east wall of Guayanilla Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 6

video April 15: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 6 to explore the top of a platform carbonate sequence (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 5

video April 14: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 5 along the east wall of Mona Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 4

video April 13: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 4 along the west wall of Mona Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 3

video April 12: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 3, Pichincho (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 2

video April 11: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 2, Septentrional Fault (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 1

video April 10: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 1, Arecibo Amphitheater (Video)

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Video Clips

video April 29:
This tiny dumbo octopus was spotted swimming along at a depth of 825 meters. (Video)

This goosefish was encountered while we were exploring Whiting Seamount on the last dive of the expedition.

video April 29:
This goosefish was encountered while we were exploring Whiting Seamount. (Video)

video April 29:
This jellynose fish was observed at a depth of 545 meters. (Video)

video April 29:
A brittle star makes its way across the seafloor. (Video)

video April 28:
Spectacular footage of a sea cucumber "taking flight" during exploration of Exocet Seamount on April 28. (Video)

video April 28:
Jelly seen at approximately 800 meters water depth, while conducting mid-water transects. (Video)

video April 16:
Dumbo octopus seen while exploring the east wall of Guayanilla Canyon on April 16. (Video)

video April 16:
Bathysaurus sp., also known as the deepsea lizardfish, seen during Dive 7 of the expedition on April 16. (Video)

This jellyfish was spotted on April 16, during exploration of the east wall of Guayanilla Canyon starting at a depth of ~2,100 meters.

video April 16:
This jellyfish was spotted on April 16, during exploration of the east wall of Guayanilla Canyon. (Video)

video April 14:
The ROV encountered this squid during mid-water transects on April 14. (Video)

video April 13:
Trachymedusae floating just above the seafloor along the west wall of Mona Canyon on April 13. (Video)

Dumbo octopus seen while exploring the west wall of Mona Canyon.

video April 13:
Dumbo octopus seen while exploring the west wall of Mona Canyon. (Video)

an odd looking isopod that has paddle like appendages, but unfortunately it swims so fast, that it is hard to get a good image

video April 13:
An odd-looking isopod that has paddle-like appendages, but swims so fast, that it is hard to get an image. (Video)

A red jellyfish slowly swims along in the water column at a depth of ~1,100 meters.

video April 13:
A red jellyfish slowly swims along in the water column at a depth of ~1,100 meters. (Video)

A sea cucumber seen swimming just above the seafloor while exploring the west wall of Mona Canyon on April 13, 2015.

video April 13:
A sea cucumber seen swimming just above the seafloor while exploring the west wall of Mona Canyon. (Video)

Yes, this fish has legs—or at least modified fins that resemble legs. This Chaunax, or sea toad, began to “walk” away as D2 approached during our exploration of the west wall of Mona Canyon.

video April 12:
This Chaunax, or sea toad, began to “walk” away as D2 approached during our exploration of Mona Canyon. (Video)

video April 11:
Seirios sometimes catches glimpses of things we'd otherwise miss... (Video)

video April 10:
Ctenophore seen while exploring Arecibo Amphitheater on April 10. (Video)

Jellyfish seen while exploring Arecibo Amphitheater during the first dive of the expedition.

video April 10:
Jellyfish seen while exploring Arecibo Amphitheater during the first dive of the expedition. (Video)

 

 

 

 

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Images (Daily Updates)

The on-ship exploration team poses with D2 at the end of the expedition.

April 30
The on-ship exploration team poses with D2 at the end of the expedition. (HR)

Potentially a new observation for Puerto Rico waters, this jellynose fish was observed at the end of our dive on Whiting Seamount at a depth of 545 meters.

April 29
This jellynose fish was observed at the end of our dive on Whiting Seamount at a depth of 545 meters. (HR)

Our science team believes this to be a foraminifera, but for awhile, we were unable to identify this strange-looking 'sunburst' organism.

April 28
Our science team believes this to be a foraminifera. (HR)

A squat lobster perched on a black coral.

April 27
A squat lobster perched on a black coral. (HR)

Todd Gregory co-pilots as the vehicles reach 6,000 meters.

April 26
Todd Gregory co-pilots as the vehicles reach 6,000 meters. (HR)

D2 captures one of the world's deepest selfies!

April 25
D2 captures one of the world's deepest selfies! (HR)

ROV pilot Chris Ritter practices controlling the new manipulator arm.

April 24
ROV pilot Chris Ritter practices controlling the new manipulator arm. (HR)

While waiting for the engineers to troubleshoot our bow thruster issue, we saw a small manatee just off our bow.

April 23
While engineers worked to troubleshoot our bow thruster issue, we saw a small manatee just off our bow. (HR)

The ROV team took advantage of the time in port to complete some routine  maintenance on the vehicles and to troubleshoot a few issues.

April 22
The ROV team took time in port for routine maintenance and to troubleshoot a few issues. (HR)

The ROV team spent time in port troubleshooting the new manipulator arm.

April 18-21
The ROV team spent time in port troubleshooting the new manipulator arm. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer back in port in San Juan.

April 17
Okeanos Explorer back in port in San Juan. (HR)

Jellyfish spotted by D2.

April 16
Jellyfish spotted by D2. (HR)

Seeing two deep-sea animals interacting with each other is rare. What is particularly rare is when they behave the opposite of how we expect them to.

April 15
As we approached this armored sea robin, a brittle star climbed on top of the fish. (HR)

D2 had a fantastic encounter with a 4-6 foot squid during the dive’s mid-water transects.

April 14
D2 had a fantastic encounter with a 4-6 foot squid during the dive’s mid-water transects. (HR)

Early in the dive, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered these two polychaetes roaming a carnivorous sponge.

April 13
ROV Deep Discoverer encountered these two polychaetes roaming a carnivorous sponge. (HR)

This chrysogorgiid octocoral, unfamiliar our scientists, serves as a host to squat lobsters - just two of the exciting observations from our dive in the Pichincho area.

April 12
This chrysogorgiid octocoral, unfamiliar our scientists, serves as a host to squat lobsters. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer explores the rippled seafloor during Dive 02.

April 11
ROV Deep Discoverer explores the rippled seafloor during Dive 02. (HR)

A close up of a grenadier investigating ROV Deep Discoverer.

April 10
A close up of a grenadier investigating ROV Deep Discoverer. (HR)

During an ROV “dunk test” all systems of ROV Deep Discoverer were cleared for operations

April 9
During an ROV “dunk test” all systems of ROV Deep Discoverer were cleared for operations. (HR)

 

 

 

 

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Images (Mission Logs)

The Slocum Glider is deployed from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in early March.

April 30 Log
The Slocum Glider is deployed from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in early March.

Spotted! Even though the strobe on NG301 was broken, the Okeanos team was still able to spot the glider in the bright moonlight, with a little help from a night vision scope.

April 30 Log
Even though the strobe on NG301 was broken, the Okeanos team was able to spot the glider in the moonlight. (HR)

Coordinating the retrieval of the glider was a bit tricky, with the ship moving, the glider bobbing in the waves, and limited visibility at night, but the Okeanos team managed to attach NG301’s recovery rope to the ship’s crane and bring it safely back on board.

April 30 Log
Coordinating the retrieval of the glider was a bit tricky. (HR)

Success! After a long mission and being declared lost at sea, NG301 was safely recovered.

April 30 Log
Success! After a long mission and being declared lost at sea, NG301 was safely recovered. (HR)

Translucent shrimp bodies can mimic the translucent appearance of a polyp which makes them all the more difficult to see.

April 29 Log
Translucent shrimp can mimic the translucent appearance of a polyp which makes them more difficult to see. (HR)

Can you spot the crab on the seafloor?

April 29 Log
Can you spot the crab on the seafloor? (HR)

This tiny crab almost looks like another branch on this black coral.

April 29 Log
This tiny crab almost looks like another branch on this black coral. (HR)

Without the powerful zoom capabilities on our main camera, it’s possible that we would have missed this tiny hermit crab entirely!

April 29 Log
Without the powerful zoom capabilities on our main camera, we may have missed this tiny hermit crab! (HR)

Unless you look carefully, it’s possible to overlook this squat lobster who perfectly matches the color of its coral home.

April 29 Log
It’s possible to overlook this squat lobster who perfectly matches the color of its coral home. (HR)

While Seirios usually focuses on D2, this swimming sea cucumber stole the spotlight for a minute while D2 investigated an outcrop during our dive at Pinnacles.

April 29 Log
This swimming sea cucumber stole the spotlight for a minute while D2 investigated an outcrop. (HR)

As the vehicles climb a steep slope along the wall of Guayanilla Canyon, views like this from Seirios allow our pilots to see what is ahead and look out for any upcoming hazards. The secondary view from Seirios also gives our geologists a great sense of scale for their surroundings. From D2’s perspective, without Seirios, you would only be able to see a small portion of the feature.

April 29 Log
Views like this from Seirios allow our pilots to see what is ahead and look out for any upcoming hazards. (HR)

Red is one of the first colors of light to disappear at depth, so several animals in the deep sea use this color to “disappear.” When we document organisms with the ROVs, we are able to see these animals in a way that wouldn’t be possible without our artificial lights. In the dark of the deep sea, this shrimp would appear black.

April 29 Log
In the dark of the deep sea, this shrimp would appear black. (HR)

Sea urchins were fairly common throughout the expedition, but this one was particularly interesting due to its barbed spines and brittle star associates.

April 29 Log
This urchin was particularly interesting due to its barbed spines and brittle star associates. (HR)

We observed this type of squat lobster a couple times during the expedition, but our science team still hasn’t been able to pin down exactly what species it is.

April 29 Log
We observed this type of squat lobster a couple times during the expedition. (HR)

Brittle stars and squat lobsters are some of the most common associates that we see in corals. This brittle star has taken up residence on a beautiful purple coral that our science team hasn’t been able to identify yet.

April 29 Log
This brittle star has taken up residence on a beautiful purple coral. (HR)

Red is one of the first colors of light to disappear at depth, so several animals in the deep sea use this color to “disappear.” When we document organisms with the ROVs, we are able to see these animals in a way that wouldn’t be possible without our artificial lights. In the dark of the deep sea, this shrimp would appear black.

April 29 Log
In the dark of the deep sea, this shrimp would appear black. (HR)

Three of these wonderful animals were seen near the bottom on Dive 1 at about 4,000 meters.

April 28 Log
Three of these wonderful animals were seen near the bottom on Dive 1 at about 4,000 meters. (HR)

This beautiful hydromedusa was seen at about 3,900 m during Dive 4.

April 28 Log
This beautiful hydromedusa was seen at about 3,900 meters during Dive 4. (HR)

This delicate ctenophore almost always requires a remotely operated vehicle for proper observation.

April 28 Log
This delicate ctenophore almost always requires a remotely operated vehicle for proper observation.

This ctenophore, seen during Dive 1, is characterized by its jet black pigmentation.

April 28 Log
This ctenophore, seen during Dive 1, is characterized by its jet black pigmentation. (HR)

This long creature is a strange gelatinous animal and related to the bell-shaped medusa we have seen on this expedition.

April 28 Log
This long creature is a strange gelatinous animal and related to the bell-shaped medusa we have seen. (HR)

This coronate jellyfish had a single ‘hypertrophied’ tentacle extending behind the open bell.

April 28 Log
This coronate jellyfish had a single ‘hypertrophied’ tentacle extending behind the open bell. (HR)

Measuring the thickness the muddy ooze using the sea poke during Dive 10 on the pinnacle, south east of St. Croix.

April 27 Log
Measuring the thickness the muddy ooze using the sea poke during Dive 10 southeast of St. Croix. (HR)

A spectacular 20-meter-wide arcuate, headwall scarp in the carbonate Juanna Diaz Formation, Guayanilla Canyon, to the south of Puerto Rico (Dive 7).

April 27 Log
A spectacular 20-meter-wide arcuate, headwall scarp in the carbonate Juanna Diaz Formation, Guayanilla Canyon. (HR)

Relatively recent landslide on the east wall of Mona Canyon (dive 5). See figure 4 for location.

April 27 Log
Relatively recent landslide on the east wall of Mona Canyon (Dive 5). (HR)

Multibeam sonar bathymetry of Mona Canyon, off the northwest coast of Puerto Rico, showing large landslides that might be related to the 1918 magnitude-7.3 earthquake.

April 27 Log
Multibeam sonar bathymetry of Mona Canyon showing large landslides. (HR)

Multibeam sonar bathymetry of a large 20-kilometer-wide submarine slide on the northwest wall of the Puerto Rico Trench.

April 27 Log
Multibeam sonar bathymetry of a large submarine slide on the northwest wall of the Puerto Rico Trench. (HR)

Tsunami evacuation route sign, old San Juan.

April 27 Log
Tsunami evacuation route sign, old San Juan.

Map of the time (in hours) it took for the 1918 earthquake tsunami to traverse the oceans.

April 27 Log
Map of the time (in hours) it took for the 1918 earthquake tsunami to traverse the oceans. (HR)

Map showing the epicenters of all the magnitude 5 and greater earthquakes around Puerto Rico for the last 100 years.

April 27 Log
Map showing epicenters of magnitude 5 and greater earthquakes around Puerto Rico for last 100 years. (HR)

One of the deepest occurring grenadiers, Coryphaenoides armatus (Family Macrouridae), imaged during our first dive on the Arecibo Ampitheater, north of Puerto Rico.

April 25 Log
One of the deepest occurring grenadiers, Coryphaenoides armatus (Family Macrouridae). (HR)

Gadomus arcuatus (Family Bathygadidae) has a very long chin barbel for searching for food and long tactile rays in the pelvic and dorsal fins.

April 25 Log
Gadomus arcuatus has a long chin barbel for searching for food and long tactile rays. (HR)

El equipo de ingeniería de Okeanos Explorer.

April 23 Log
El equipo de ingeniería de Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Recuperación de Deep Discoverer.

April 23 Log
Recuperación de Deep Discoverer. (HR)

Cada mañana y después de cada inmersión , el equipo pasa horas cuidando de los vehículos.

April 23 Log
Cada mañana y después de cada inmersión , el equipo pasa horas cuidando de los vehículos. (HR)

Despliegue de Seirios.

April 23 Log
Despliegue de Seirios. (HR)

Data management intern Dan Bolan works in the rack room, the computer system hub for the ship.

April 19 Log
Data management intern Dan Bolan works in the rack room, the computer system hub for the ship. (HR)

Scientist Andrea Quattrini enters data into the evenlog, one of the primary tools the science team uses to stay in contact with the shore-side science team and to record observations.

April 19 Log
Scientist Andrea Quattrini enters data into the evenlog. (HR)

Overview of Okeanos dives the Mona Passage region. The long red line highlights the area of the Septentrional Fault.

April 16 Log
Overview of Okeanos dives the Mona Passage region. The red line highlights the Septentrional Fault. (HR)

Outcrops of breccia and conglomerate along the east wall of Mona Canyon.

April 16 Log
Outcrops of breccia and conglomerate along the east wall of Mona Canyon. (HR)

This sea star, Laetmaster spectabilis, has not been recorded since it was initially described 130 years ago.

April 16 Log
This sea star has not been recorded since it was initially described 130 years ago. (HR)

During our dive along the west wall of Mona Canyon, we encountered a younger carbonate platform sequence of rocks.

April 16 Log
On the west wall of Mona Canyon, we encountered a younger carbonate platform sequence of rocks. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer imaging a series of rippled bedforms. The long red line highlights the area of the Septentrional Fault.

April 16 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer imaging a series of rippled bedforms. (HR)

Large carbonate block encountered during Dive 6.

April 16 Log
Large carbonate block encountered during Dive 6. (HR)

Evidence of past erosion that ROV Deep Discoverer encountered during Dive 3.

April 16 Log
Evidence of past erosion that ROV Deep Discoverer encountered during Dive 3. (HR)

As ROV Deep Discoverer approached, this sea toad (Chaunax sp.) “walked” away.

April 16 Log
As ROV Deep Discoverer approached, this sea toad (Chaunax sp.) “walked” away. (HR)

During our dive on Pichincho, we encountered a diversity of sponges and a few barnacle crinoids, seen here in the middle of the picture.

April 16 Log
During our dive on Pichincho, we encountered a diversity of sponges and a few barnacle crinoids. (HR)

This sharktooth moray eel was spotted during Dive 03 in the Mona Passage.

April 16 Log
This sharktooth moray eel was spotted during Dive 03 in the Mona Passage. (HR)

Although we observed this scorpionfish during the Platform dive, it appears to be observing us.

April 16 Log
Although we observed this scorpionfish during the Platform dive, it appears to be observing us. (HR)

A shrimp associate with a very serrated rostrum inhabiting a glass sponge.

April 16 Log
A shrimp associate with a very serrated rostrum inhabiting a glass sponge. (HR)

A brittle star associate with a lace coral demonstrates symbiosis in the deep sea.

April 16 Log
A brittle star associate with a lace coral demonstrates symbiosis in the deep sea. (HR)

Brittle stars may perch on corals to feed on food particles in the water column.

April 16 Log
Brittle stars may perch on corals to feed on food particles in the water column. (HR)

A slender dory (Parazen pacificus) was imaged puffing up the sediment, possibly trying to feed.

April 16 Log
A slender dory (Parazen pacificus) was imaged puffing up the sediment, possibly trying to feed. (HR)

Un especies de coral con estrellas a Platform.

April 15 Log
Un especies de coral con estrellas a Platform. (HR)

El vehículo operado remotamente Deep Discoverer (D2).

April 15 Log
El vehículo operado remotamente Deep Discoverer. (HR)

Por fin encontramos un cartucho de aproximadamente 50 cm (20 pulgadas)

April 15 Log
Por fin encontramos un cartucho de aproximadamente 50 cm (20 pulgadas). (HR)

Bathymetría de Platform.

April 15 Log
Bathymetría de Platform. (HR)

LT Gallant mans the bridge during ROV recovery.

April 15 Log
LT Gallant mans the bridge during ROV recovery. (HR)

Sunrise over Puerto Rico as the ship prepares for an ROV dive.

April 15 Log
Sunrise over Puerto Rico as the ship prepares for an ROV dive. (HR)

Despite its name, squat lobsters are most closely related to hermit crabs and mole crabs, not lobsters.

April 13 Log
Despite its name, squat lobsters are most closely related to hermit crabs and mole crabs, not lobsters. (HR)

Brisingid sea stars, like most sea stars, are capable of regenerating their arms if one is removed. This one is in the process of re-growing its fifth arm.

April 13 Log
Brisingid sea stars, like most sea stars, are capable of regenerating their arms if one is removed. (HR)

This crazy looking creature is a carniverous sponge. Most people do not think of sponges as living organisms, but they are one of the most primitive animals.

April 13 Log
This crazy-looking creature is a carniverous sponge. (HR)

Sea cucumbers are always one of my favorite animals to see on a dive, if only because I’m always interested to see what they will look like this time! Internally, they are pretty much all the same, but their exteriors can be completely see through or a variety of colors, flattened, or spikey, like this one. I am not exactly sure what determines their shape, but there has to be some benefit for each morphology.

April 13 Log
Sea cucumbers are always one of my favorite animals to see on a dive. (HR)

This rare dumbo octopus (Cirrothauma murrayi) is often called the Blind Octopod due to the lack of a lens and reduced retina in its eyes. Its eyes can really only detect light and cannot form images.

April 13 Log
This rare dumbo octopus is often called the Blind Octopod due to the lack of a lens and reduced retina in its eyes. (HR)

We spotted this trachymedusae just above the seafloor along the west wall of Mona Canyon. While you may see shallow water jellyfish all the time, it is often very difficult to collect information about deep-sea jellyfish as they break up in nets and are hard to keep intact if collected. This is one of the reasons why our videographers always try to get good, detailed shots of gelatinous animals.

April 13 Log
We spotted this trachymedusae just above the seafloor along the west wall of Mona Canyon. (HR)

Most people are familiar with sea stars, but there is incredible diversity of sea stars in the deep sea and several don’t look anything like their shallow-water relatives. This is a slime star, and if you look really closely through the mucus layer, you can see a shape that may look a little more familiar. Slime stars are found all over the world and have the ability to produce mucus as a defense mechanism.

April 13 Log
This is a slime star; if you look closely through the mucus layer, you can see a shape that may look more familiar. (HR)

This hermit crab may seem similar to something you have seen on land or in shallow water, but this one uses an anemone instead of a shell!

April 13 Log
This hermit crab uses an anemone instead of a shell! (HR)

This is a predatory tunicate with a polychaete living with it. During Dive 4 of Océano Profundo, we saw several of these, with only one polychaete per tunicate which has our science team thinking that there might be a relationship between the two that benefits one or both of them.

April 13 Log
This is a predatory tunicate with a polychaete living with it. (HR)

Mission map showing the operating areas, with priority areas outlined in black, for Leg 3 of Océano Profundo 2015: Exploring Puerto Rico’s Seamounts, Trenches, and Troughs.

April 10 Log
Mission map showing the operating areas, with priority areas outlined in black, for Leg 3 of the expedition. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer leaves San Juan, Puerto Rico, for the start of the cruise.

April 10 Log
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer leaves San Juan, Puerto Rico, for the start of the cruise. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer is deployed for a dive.

April 10 Log
Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer is deployed for a dive. (HR)

 

 

 

 

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Images (Background Essays)

Mission map showing the operating areas, with priority areas outlined in black, for Leg 3.

Mission Plan
Mission map showing the operating areas, with priority areas outlined in black, for Leg 3. (HR)

Bathymetry of the northeast corner of the Caribbean Plate, including the Puerto Rico Trench.

Mission Plan
Bathymetry of the northeast corner of the Caribbean Plate, including the Puerto Rico Trench.

During the Seamounts of the Anegada Passage Expedition just offshore the nearby British Virgin Islands, the science team encountered this large colony of black coral.

Mission Plan
During the Seamounts of the Anegada Passage Expedition, scientists encountered this colony of black coral. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real-time to a shore-based hub.

Mission Plan
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real-time to shore. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real-time to a shore-based hub.

¡Bienvenidos!
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer llega a Puerto Rico para comenzar Océano Profundo 2015. (HR)

Bathymetry of the northeast corner of the Caribbean Plate showing the major faults and plate boundaries.

Geology of Puerto Rico
Bathymetry of the northeast corner of the Caribbean Plate showing the major faults and plate boundaries. (HR)

Cross section view looking west showing how the Puerto Rico Trench forms between the obliquely subducting North American Plate and the overriding Caribbean Plate.

Geology of Puerto Rico
Cross section view looking west showing how the Puerto Rico Trench formed. (HR)

How big is the Puerto Rico Trench? Cross sections, all drawn to the same scale, comparing various canyons and troughs.

Geology of Puerto Rico
How big is the Puerto Rico Trench? Cross sections, drawn to the same scale, comparing canyons. (HR)

View of the Mona Canyon looking south towards the Mona Passage.

Geology of Puerto Rico
View of the Mona Canyon looking south towards the Mona Passage. (HR)

A member of the deepwater snapper-grouper complex, the misty grouper at 389 meters on Conrad Seamount.

Snapper-Grouper Complex
A member of the deepwater snapper-grouper complex, the misty grouper. (HR)

Mr. L Román holding a catch of (on left) Atlantic Scombrops (Scombrops oculatus) and (on right) Cartucho (Etelis oculatus).

Snapper-Grouper Complex
Mr. L Román holding a catch of Atlantic Scombrops and Cartucho. (HR)

Queen snapper resting on the seafloor at 439 meters on Dog Seamount in the Caribbean.

Snapper-Grouper Complex
Queen snapper resting on the seafloor on Dog Seamount in the Caribbean. (HR)

Vertical long line used in western Puerto Rico to capture deep-water snappers and groupers.

Snapper-Grouper Complex
Vertical long line used in Puerto Rico to capture deep-water snappers and groupers. (HR)

Preliminary cruise map showing planned operations for Leg 2 of the expedition.

Leg 2
Preliminary cruise map showing planned operations for Leg 2 of the expedition. (HR)

Preliminary cruise map showing Priority 1 survey area.

Leg 2
Preliminary cruise map showing Leg 2, Priority 1 survey area. (HR)

Oblique view showing Priority 1 survey area. Figure created in Fledermaus.

Leg 2
Oblique view showing Leg 2, Priority 1 survey area. Figure created in Fledermaus. (HR)

Map showing the area where the Okeanos Explorer will conduct operations during the first leg of the Caribbean mapping expedition.

Leg 1
Map showing area of operations during the first leg of the Caribbean mapping expedition. (HR)

Map showing path of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer's transit to the Caribbean and the final survey area.

Leg 1
Map showing path of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer's transit to the Caribbean and the final survey area. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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