Exploring Puerto Rico’s Seamounts, Trenches, & Troughs





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The on-ship exploration team.

The on-ship exploration team poses with D2 at the end of the expedition. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 30, 2015

Expedition Complete!

Prior to pulling into port this morning, we recovered a Slocum glider that had been deployed on Leg 2 of this expedition and which had been declared lost at sea. Less than 24 hours ago, the glider returned to the surface and transmitted its position. Luckily, the glider was only a couple miles off of our course back into port, so we adjusted our plans to accommodate this recovery. We arrived in San Juan at 0900 and our team quickly began demobilization and securing everything for the long transit to the Pacific. Despite the mechanical issues we experienced, we still had a productive cruise. We explored seafloor habitats for fisheries managers, collected valuable data for assessing and predicting geohazzards, conducted some of the deepest ROV work ever in the Puerto Rico Trench,  documented several range extensions and potential new species, and made many rare observations. 


 


 

 

 

Potentially a new observation for Puerto Rico waters, this jellynose fish was observed at the end of our dive on Whiting Seamount at a depth of 545 meters.

Potentially a new observation for Puerto Rico waters, this jellynose fish was observed at the end of our dive on Whiting Seamount at a depth of 545 meters. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 29, 2015

Dive 12: Whiting Seamount

Today’s dive was the first ever exploration of Whiting Seamount. ROV Deep Discoverer landed on a rubble strewn slope at a depth of 1,301 meters. This dive traversed from the Cretaceous-Eocene basement across the unconformity with the overlying Late Oligocene to Early Pliocene Platform sequence. Several species of corals and sponge were observed during this dive, many new for this expedition, including a few black coral, bamboo coral, an unknown purple Plexaurid, and cup corals. At least 15 fish species were observed, including tinselfish, a few species of rattails, several cusk eels, Darwin’s Slimehead, and catsharks. Numerous species of crustaceans were seen during our transit upslope, including squat lobsters and “decorator” crabs. Seastars, brisignids, crinoids, and ophiuroid brittle stars were also common.  We also documented at least two range extensions, as a Shaefer's anglerfish (Sladenia shaefersi) and a jellynose (Ateleopodidae) were not previously known to occur off Puerto Rico.


 


 

 

 

Our science team believes this to be a foraminifera, but for a while we were unable to identify this strange looking

Our science team believes this to be a foraminifera, but for awhile, we were unable to identify this strange-looking "sunburst" organism. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 28, 2015

18°, 01.891' N ; 064°, 19.440' W; 2900.7 meters

Dive 11: Exocet Seamount

Today we dove on Exocet Seamount, located northwest of St. Croix. The dive began with five midwater transects conducted for 10 minutes every 100 meters in depth, from 800-1,200 meters. During these transects, ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) observed several empty larvacean houses, a few ctenophores, arrow worms, jellyfish, midwater fishes, and a fantastic organism that we believe to be a foraminiferan that looked like a sunburst. ROV Deep Discoverer landed on a sedimented seafloor with little fauna at a depth of 2,898 meters. As we transited up slope, we encountered manganese-encrusted carbonate rocks exhibiting evidence of possible cleavage and folding. Corals observed during this dive included a cup coral, one black coral, two bamboo corals, and two other octocorals. Also observed were at least eight species of fish, four sea star species, shrimp, squat lobsters, and several species of glass sponges. Of note, several items of trash (e.g., plastic, rusty steel cans) were seen, particularly in the beginning of the dive.


 


 

 

 

A squat lobster perched on a black coral.

A squat lobster perched on a black coral. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 27, 2015

17°40'29.99"N, 64°31'36.34"W; 915 meters

Dive 10: Pinnacles

Today we had a fantastic dive on two unknown sonar anomalies just south of St. Croix. These anomalies were identified a few weeks ago by our colleagues at the National Ocean Service on NOAA Ship Nancy Foster. After processing their data, the scientists were unable to determine what the origin of these features, so they asked Okeanos Explorer to investigate. ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) landed on a sedimented seafloor at a depth of 870 meters and began to transit upslope to investigate the unknown feature. Both features that we investigated had a high diversity of fauna and were on a mud covered surface that is likely the top of the Pliocene-Miocene carbonate platform. The first pinnacle was approximately circular with a diameter of 200 meters and a height of 50 meters. The lower part of the mound consisted of iron manganese-coated carbonate debris with some mud covering. Larger, rounded carbonate boulders formed the mid part of the slope and the upper surface was largely mud covered. The second feature (~930-915 meters water depth) was smaller and also consisted of iron manganese-coated carbonate rubble. Coral and associate diversity was high on both features. Interestingly, there were different coral species present on the mounds surveyed in different depths. At least 26 species of black corals, octocorals, cup corals, and other stony corals were observed. We also saw several sponges, brittle stars, squat lobsters, barnacles, fish, shrimp, urchins, and hermit crabs. Most of the species observed today were new observations for this expedition. The origin of the pinnacles remains an enigma, with perhaps the most likely explanation being that they are blocks that slid down from the slope-shelf break up slope that are breaking down in situ.


 


 

 

 

Todd Gregory co-pilots as the vehicles reach 6,000 m.

Todd Gregory co-pilots as the vehicles reach 6,000 meters. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 9

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 26, 2015

19.14928 N, 65.40758 W

Dive 9: Puerto Rico Trench - South Wall

Today’s dive was the first time ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) has reached it rated depth of 6,000 meters. As the ROV descended, the control room was crowded with the engineers who designed and built the ROV. They proudly watched as D2 slowly approached 6,000 meters. Unfortunately, we were not able to stay long at that depth, as the ROV pilots noticed a problem with the mineral oil levels in the high voltage compensator system on D2, so we recovered the vehicles early, in case the low oil volume was a symptom of a bigger problem. Once the ROV was on deck the engineers did not find an obvious problem, so they will continue to monitor the compensator levels closely for the next couple dives. 


 


 

 

 

D2 captures one of the world's deepest selfies!

D2 captures one of the world's deepest selfies! Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 8

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 25, 2015

Dive 8: Engineering Dive

Okeanos Explorer departed port today at 0900 and conducted an engineering dive just north of San Juan, Puerto Rico. ROV Deep Discoverer landed on a sedimented seafloor with a gentle slope. We stayed stationary for most of the dive while the ROV team practiced using the manipulator arms, but we did observe a few sea cucumbers, fish, and shrimp. During the dive, we deployed a GoPro and captured one of the world's deepest selfies!


 


 

 

 

ROV pilot Chris Ritter practices controlling the new manipulator arm.

ROV pilot Chris Ritter practices controlling the new manipulator arm. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 24, 2015

Still in San Juan

We spent the day alongside in the Old City of San Juan while the ship's engineers worked diligently to correct the problem with the bow thruster. By late afternoon, they were successful and the ship was given a clean bill of health. Unfortunately, it was too late to get underway today, so we will get underway first thing on Saturday. The ROV pilots spent the day continuing to practice with the new manipulator arm.


 


 

 

 

While waiting for the engineers to troubleshoot our bow thruster issue, we saw a small manatee just off our bow.

While waiting for the engineers to troubleshoot our bow thruster issue, we saw a small manatee just off our bow. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 23, 2015

Back in San Juan

Okeanos got underway today for a short time until a mechanical issue with our bow thruster was noticed and we return to port. The ship's engineers spent the day troubleshooting the problem. We will need to wait until tomorrow to see if our solutions worked, but hopefully we will be back underway soon. 


 


 

 

 

The ROV team took advantage of the time in port to complete some routine  maintenance on the vehicles and to troubleshoot a few issues.

The ROV team took advantage of the time in port to complete some routine maintenance on the vehicles and to troubleshoot a few issues. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 22, 2015

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Okeanos Explorer remained in port in San Juan, Puerto Rico, today. With one AC unit up and running, we have been able to successfully bring back all mission systems. We spent most of the day testing new equipment and reworking our dive plan to accommodate the most amount of high-priority dive sites during our remaining sea days. Up next is an engineering dive tomorrow and then the north wall of the Puerto Rico Trench the following day, which will be ROV Deep Discoverer's first 6,000-meter dive.


 


 

 

 

The ROV team spent time in port troubleshooting the new manipulator arm.

The ROV team spent time in port troubleshooting the new manipulator arm. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 18 - 21, 2015

In-port Update

Over the last several days, the engineering team on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer has worked tirelessly to get our air conditioning back up and running so that we can safely operate the mission-critical electronics. The engineers were successful yesterday and we prepared to get back underway. Unfortunately, one of the ship’s crew had a family emergency and needed to depart the ship. We now do not meet safe manning requirements and will be delayed for a few more days. Luckily, the ship was able to act quickly and secured a replacement crew member which should, hopefully, have us back at sea this Thursday. While in port, our team has been busy preparing to sail, testing new equipment, catching up on backlogged work, and bringing mission systems back on line after they were shut down to protect them from overheating.


 


 

 

 

JOkeanos Explorer back in port in San Juan.

Okeanos Explorer back in port in San Juan. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 17, 2015

Dive Canceled

Today’s dive was canceled due to an issue with the Okeanos Explorer’s air conditioning. The ship’s engineering team spent the day troubleshooting the issue, but unfortunately we will need to head into port for a repair. All of the electronic equipment onboard, such as our computers that control the vehicle and store all of our data,  is sensitive to overheating at high temperatures and cannot be safely used under current conditions on the ship. Our mission team used the time to work on vehicle maintenance, catch up on work, and  fill multibeam holidays...until the system was too hot to operate.


 


 

 

 

Jellyfish spotted by D2.

Jellyfish spotted by D2. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 7

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 16, 2015

Dive 7: Guayanilla Canyon, East Wall

Dive 07 transited up the east wall of Guayanilla Canyon starting from a depth of 2,100 meters. At the start of the dive, we encountered nice outcrops of well bedded, but cleaved, shales and sandstones that form part of the Late Oligocence Juana Diaz Clastic Formation. As we traversed up slope, we transitioned into extensive outcrops of bedded carbonates of the Middle Miocene to Early Pliocence Ponce carbonate formation. Most outcrops appeared to have gentle dips; however, in the middle of the carbonate section, we observed several examples of slope failures. During the dive, we observed several species of corals, but relatively few sponges and sessile fauna overall. We reached a vertical cliff face at ~1,800 meters that had little to no colonization of benthic fauna, but evidence of extensive bioerosion in some of the layers. Other notable observations on this dive included a dandelion siphonophore, benthic jellyfish, and a benthic ctenophore on a sea pen.


 


 

 

 

Seeing two deep sea animals interacting with each other is rare. What is particularly rare is when they behave the opposite of how we expect them to. As we approached this armored sea robin, a brittle star climbed on top. We were pretty sure that the fish would try to eat the brittle star, but as it turns out, it just wanted to dislodge the extra baggage. The brittle star then proceeded to climb on top of the sea robin two more times.

Seeing two deep sea animals interacting with each other is rare. What is particularly rare is when they behave the opposite of how we expect them to. As we approached this armored sea robin, a brittle star climbed on top. We were pretty sure that the fish would try to eat the brittle star, but as it turns out, it just wanted to dislodge the extra baggage. The brittle star then proceeded to climb on top of the sea robin two more times. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 6

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 15, 2015

18.14946 N, 67.52194 W; 593 meters

Dive 6: Platform

Dive 06 investigated the top of a Late Oligocene to Pilocene platform carbonate sequence and traversed a relatively minor fault scarp. This fault is the easterly extension of an approximately 100-kilometer-long fault system that forms the northern wall of the rift between the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. The dive began at a depth of 593 meters on a relatively gently dipping, current-swept limestone pavement. After traversing 600 meters, more irregular topography was reached, which continued for about 1.2 kilometers until we reached and then traversed the eroded fault scarp. In terms of biodiversity, we had a great dive, documenting a higher diversity of coral, sponges, and fish than on the other dives so far. However, many of the scleractinian corals were small (less than 10 centimeter-tall colonies). Approximately 30 species of fishes were seen, including one observation of a queen snapper. Other fauna included anemones, sea stars, squat lobsters, and colonial tunicates. Highlights of the dive included a swimming terebellid worm, an armored sea robin responding to the ROV, and a rare sea urchin with paddle-like spines.


 


 

 

 

ROV Deep Discoverer, meet squid. Squid, meet D2. D2 had a fantastic encounter with a 4-6 foot squid during the dive’s mid-water transects.

ROV Deep Discoverer, meet squid. Squid, meet D2. D2 had a fantastic encounter with a four to six foot squid during the dive’s mid-water transects. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 5

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 14, 2015

Dive 5: Mona Canyon – East Wall

Dive 05 began with a series of mid-water transects at 100-meter intervals between 800 and 1,200 meters. Fauna documented included squid, arrow worms, jellyfish, siphonophores, and small fish. ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) landed on the seafloor at a depth of 4,000 meters and transited upslope over Late Cretaceous to Middle Eocene basement rock which makes up the core of Puerto Rico and sits below the approimately one-kilometer thick carbonate layer we’d previously dived on. After traversing approximately 100 vertical meters of sedimented seafloor with little fauna, D2 climbed 200 vertical meters of steeply dipping and sometimes near vertical cliffs of outcrop of basement volcanic rocks. Biological observations during the dive included a diversity of sponges, black corals, octocorals, sea stars, fish, shrimp, and squat lobsters. Two exciting highlights from today’s dive were the close encounter with a 1.5-2 meter squid and the documentation of a rare six-arm sea star that had not been recorded, collected, or observed since the specimen was described 130 years ago.


 


 

 

 

TEarly in the dive, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered these two polychaetes roaming a carnivorous sponge.

Early in the dive, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered these two polychaetes roaming a carnivorous sponge. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 4

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 13, 2015

18.75110 N, 67.55268 W; 3,927 meters

Dive 4: Mona Canyon – West Wall

ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) began Dive 4 with a series of mid-water transects to investigate life in the water column. During these transects, D2 imaged jellyfish, larvaceans, midwater fish, and siphonophores. D2 landed on a sedimented seafloor with scattered rubble at a depth of 3,927 meters. Our dive traversed two large steep exposures of well-bedded Late Miocene to Oligocene platform carbonates, both of which were underlain by less steeply dipping sediment-covered slopes with boulders of carbonate derived from the outcrops above. Downslope, sediment-filled channels were present, and their presence, together with the small amounts of iron manganese coating on much, but not all, of the carbonate attests to the recent instability of this slope. Fauna during this dive included a diversity of sponges, arrow worms, sea pens, black corals, a bamboo coral, a ctenophore, anemones, a variety and large number of sea cucumbers, a halosaur, crinoids, several large grenadiers, a lizardfish, urchins, sea stars, and shrimp. Some of the highlights of the dive were a dumbo octopus, imaging several delicate gelatinous organisms including several beautiful jellyfish, and documenting several instances of a potential symbiotic relationship between a predatory tunicate and a polychaete.


 


 

 

 

This chrysogorgiid octocoral, unfamiliar our scientists,  serves as a host to squat lobsters - just two of the exciting observations from our dive in the Pichincho area.

This chrysogorgiid octocoral, unfamiliar our scientists, serves as a host to squat lobsters - just two of the exciting observations from our dive in the Pichincho area. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 3

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 12, 2015

18.37778 N, 67.77927 W; 607 meters

Dive 3: Pichincho

ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) had a fantastic dive today exploring Pichincho, an area identified as high priority for exploration by the Caribbean Fisheries Management Council. During this dive, we traversed a fault scarp through the upper part of the Oligocene-Miocene platform carbonate sequence. D2 landed on a sedimented bottom with bivalve shells, small rubble, scattered detritus, and anthropogenic (human-produced) trash. As D2 transited upslope, we encountered a number of carbonate rock faces that were encrusted with benthic fauna, predominantly sponges, which were under overhangs and on non-sedimented surfaces. Towards the end of the dive, D2 encountered complicated carbonate topography with rounded outcrops, sinkholes, and large cracks. This is typical karst topography, which provides evidence that this location was once above sea level. Biological observations during this dive included a low abundance of at least 13 species of fish, few octocorals, lace corals, black corals, cup corals, a variety of sea stars, crinoids, squat lobsters, brittle stars, urchins, zooanthids, and shrimp. We also encountered several instances of trash littering the seafloor. Highlights of the dive included species that have yet to be formally described, a “walking” Chaunax pictus, and rare observations of a seastars preying upon sponges.


 


 

 

 

ROV Deep Discoverer explores the rippled seafloor during Dive 02.

ROV Deep Discoverer explores the rippled seafloor during Dive 02. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 2

 

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 11, 2015

19.00723 N; 67.72738 W; 3,673 meters

Dive 2: Septentrional Fault

Dive 2 of Océano Profundo investigated the apparent termination of the Septentrional Fault. Beginning at a depth of 3,673 meters, ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) landed on rippled, coarse grain sediment with shells and detritus in the troughs of the ripples. After traversing 500 meters, we reached the valley wall and began to ascend a relatively continuous 40-degree dipping slope consisting of coarse grained sediment with a few areas of rock debris. The slope was produced by debris currents flowing down the valley side depositing sediment to cover the jagged rock faces below. Towards the end of the dive (3,225 meters), we encountered a 20-meter high outcrop of conglomerate, a rock that consists of large, rounded clasts that have been cemented together. This outcrop was likely the source of  much of the rock debris that we observed lower on the slope.  Throughout the dive there was little visible benthic life and very few fish. The most consistent observations during the dive were of anthropogenic (human-produced) trash and decomposing algal detritus (Sargassum). Fauna observed during the dive included shrimp, anemones (some colonizing trash on the seafloor), a grenadier, a slime star, sea cucumbers, brisingid seastars, hydroids, sponges, squat lobsters, crinoids, a lizardfish, and a hermit crab with an anemone on its back. D2 was recovered from a depth of 3,148 after a final observation of the dive’s only bamboo coral.

 




Actualización diaria del 11 de abril de 2015 – Falla Septentrional

La Inmersión 02 de Océano Profundo investigó el aparente final de la Falla Septentrional. Comenzando a una profundidad de 3,673 metros (12,050 pies, apróx.), el ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) tocó fondo marino sobre sedimentos ondulados y de granos gruesos, con caracoles y detritus en los abrevaderos de las ondas. Luego de atravesar 500 metros (1,640 pies, aprox.), alcanzamos el muro del valle y comenzamos a ascender una cuesta relativamente continua de unos 40 grados la cual consistía de sedimentos de granos gruesos con algunas rocas. La cuesta fue producida por las corrientes de escombros que fluyen descendiendo el lado del valle y depositan el sedimento que recubre las superficies rocosas irregulares del fondo. Hacia el final de la inmersión, a unos 3,225 metros (10,580 pies, aprox.), encontramos un farallón de 20 metros (65 pies, aprox.) de alto compuesto de conglomerado, una roca formada por varios clastos grandes y redondeados que se han fusionado. Este farallón probablemente es la fuente de la mayoría de los escombros rocosos que se observaron más abajo en la pendiente. Durante el transcurso de la inmersión, no se observó mucha vida bentónica, y muy pocos peces. Las observaciones más consistentes incluían basura antropogénica y detritus de algas (Sargassum) en estado de descomposición. La fauna que se pudo observar durante la inmersión incluyó camarones, anémonas (algunas de las cuales colonizaban basuras en el fondo del mar), un pez granadero, una estrella de mar cojín, pepinos de mar, estrellas de mar brisíngidas, hidroides, esponjas, langostinos, crinoideos, un pez chile y un cangrejo ermitaño que llevaba una anémona en su espalda. D2 fue recuperado a una profundidad de 3,148 metros (10,328 pies, aprox.) después de haber observado el único coral bambú hallado durante esta inmersión. Traducido al español por Programa Sea Grant Puerto Rico.

 


 

 

 

A close up of a grenadier investigating ROV Deep Discoverer.

A close up of a grenadier investigating ROV Deep Discoverer. Click image for credit and larger view.

camera icon Video highlights from Dive 1

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 10, 2015

66.81116 N, 18.86009 W; 4,058 meters

Dive 1: Arecibo Amphitheater

The first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of Océano Profundo 2015 investigated the geomorphology and potential slope failures in Guajataca Canyon along the Arecibo Amphitheater, a section of the marginal escarpment of the carbonate platform. ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) landed at a depth of 4,055 meters on a sedimented seafloor with little benthic fauna. During the dive, D2 traversed a sequence of variably sedimented carbonate and interspersed sandstone rocks. Most of the outcrops had iron manganese coatings of variable thickness, but at the beginning of the dive, there was some recent disruption of the iron manganese crust to reveal the white carbonate. Importantly, there was little evidence of recent slope failure. Biota in this area included ctenophores, brisingid sea stars, cusk eels, anemones, and a diversity of sponges, as well a few colonies of bamboo coral. As D2 climbed the escarpment, we encountered a variety of steep rock faces, with varying degrees of colonization by sponges. Fauna encountered during the second half of the dive included seastars, crinoids, sea cucumbers, swimming polychaetes, bamboo coral, sponges, ctenophores, shrimp, anemones, squat lobsters, jellyfish, and several species of rattail fishes.

 


 

 

 

During an ROV “dunk test” all systems of ROV Deep Discoverer were cleared for operations.

During an ROV “dunk test” all systems of ROV Deep Discoverer were cleared for operations. Click image for credit and larger view.

Durante una prueba de sumersión, se comprobó que todos los sistemas del ROV Deep Discoverer fueron certificados como operacionales.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
April 9, 2015

And We're Off!

Leg 3 of Océano Profundo began today. After a successful morning of press tours, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer left port in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at 1400. Our team has spent the last few months prepping remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) Deep Discoverer and Seirios, testing new equipment, mapping potential dive targets, working with the science and management communities to identify priority areas, and refining our operating plans for the ROV cruise that will occur over the next month. Since boarding the ship earlier this week, our at-sea team has been busy getting familiar with the ship, conducting engineering trials, reviewing safety procedures, and preparing for upcoming operations. Our first ROV dive is planned for tomorrow and will investigate the Arecibo Amphitheater, a virtually unknown escarpment just north of San Juan.

 



¡La aventura comienza!

El tercer tramo de la expedición Océano Profundo comenzó hoy. Luego de una serie de exitosas visitas de la prensa, el Buque Explorador de la NOAA, Okeanos, zarpó del puerto de San Juan, Puerto Rico, a las 1400. Nuestro equipo de trabajo lleva los últimos meses preparando los vehículos operados a distancia (ROV, por sus siglas en inglés) Deep Discoverer y Seirios, probando equipos nuevos, mapeando los potenciales objetos de buceo, trabajando con la comunidad científica y de manejo para identificar áreas prioritarias, y refinando nuestros planes operacionales en relación al viaje de exploración para los ROV que ocurrirán durante el próximo mes. Desde que abordaron el buque en días anteriores, nuestro equipo marino se ha estado familiarizando con el navío, ejecutando pruebas de ingeniería, revisando los procedimientos de seguridad y preparándose para las operaciones a realizar próximamente. Nuestro primer lanzamiento de ROV está planificado para mañana e investigará el anfiteatro de Arecibo, un escarpe (declive) casi desconocido justo al norte de San Juan. Traducido al español por Programa Sea Grant Puerto Rico.

 


 

 

 

 

 

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