Exploring Atlantic Canyons & Seamounts





Leg 2: Highlight Images

This beautiful hydromedusa
was imaged in Washington Canyon. Unfortunately, none of the scientists watching the dive live specialized in water column life.  However, due to the pace at which telepresence allows us to disseminate information, the video of this organism was quickly circulated around the country to experts in the field and the hydromedusa was identified as Cyclocanna welshi with a couple days.

This beautiful hydromedusa was imaged in Washington Canyon. Unfortunately, none of the scientists watching the dive live specialized in water column life. However, due to the pace at which telepresence allows us to disseminate information, the video of this organism was quickly circulated around the country to experts in the field and the hydromedusa was identified as Cyclocanna welshi within a couple days. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts. Download high-resolution version (1.7 Mb).

 


 

One of the many blackbelly rosefish ROV Deep Discoverer encountered in Washington Canyon.

One of the many blackbelly rosefish remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Deep Discoverer encountered in Washington Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.


A skate rests along the wall of Washington Canyon.

A skate rests along the wall of Washington Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

ROV Deep Discoverer’s lights drew a swarm of small crustaceans, and this anemone took full advantage of the free meal. Here amphipods are captured by the specially adapted stinging cells, called nematocysts, on the anemone’s tentacle.

ROV Deep Discoverer’s lights drew a swarm of small crustaceans, and this anemone took full advantage of the free meal. Here, amphipods are captured by the specially adapted stinging cells, called nematocysts, on the anemone’s tentacles. Click image for larger view and image credit.


Soft sedimented seafloor with anemones and red crabs was a typical landscape of the area we surveyed in Washington canyon.

Soft sedimented seafloor with anemones and red crabs was a typical landscape of the area we surveyed in Washington Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

: Food is a valuable commodity in the deep sea. Here three crabs fight over a squid for  their next meal.

Food is a valuable commodity in the deep sea. Here, three crabs fight over a squid for their next meal. Click image for larger view and image credit.


Cephopods on parade! In Washington Canyon we saw several octopods and squid. Here a small octopus is photobombed by a squid.

Cephopods on parade! In Washington Canyon, we saw several octopods and squid. Here, a small octopus is photobombed by a squid. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

Camera Sled Seirios encounters a school of squid while ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Washington Canyon.

Camera sled Seirios encounters a school of squid while ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Washington Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.


One of the large colonies of bubblegum coral ROV Deep Discoverer imaged in Norfolk Canyon.

One of the large colonies of bubblegum coral ROV Deep Discoverer imaged in Norfolk Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

A deep sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. If you look carefully you can see a skate egg case on the same branch as the crab and a colony of the white morph of bubblegum coral in the background.

A deep-sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. If you look carefully, you can see a skate egg case on the same branch as the crab and a colony of the white morph of bubblegum coral in the background. Click image for larger view and image credit.


A small chaunx imaged in Norfolk Canyon.

A small chaunax imaged in Norfolk Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

The steep ledges of Norfolk canyon proved to be home to a large diversity of life. Here a batstar resides on the wall next to a colony of deepsea octocoral and sponges. The arm of several brittle stars can also be seen poking out of the sediment.

The steep ledges of Norfolk Canyon proved to be home to a large diversity of life. Here, a batstar resides on the wall next to a colony of deep-sea octocoral and sponges. The arm of several brittle stars can also be seen poking out of the sediment. Click image for larger view and image credit.


The ROV team spends some time on the back deck planning for the next day’s dive.

The ROV team spends some time on the back deck planning for the next day’s dive. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

Todd Gregory introduces new personnel to the remotely operated vehicles.

Todd Gregory introduces new personnel to the remotely operated vehicles. Click image for larger view and image credit.


Jesse Aussebell, Jamie Austin, and Melissa Ryan engage with the shore-side science team during an ROV dive.

Jesse Aussebell, Jamie Austin, and Melissa Ryan engage with the shore-side science team during an ROV dive. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

The view from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer’s control room as ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Norfolk Canyon.

The view from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer’s control room as ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Norfolk Canyon. Click image for larger view and image credit.


Staff at the National Aquarium welcomes Okeanos Explorer to Baltimore, MD.

Staff at the National Aquarium welcomes Okeanos Explorer to Baltimore, Maryland. Click image for larger view and image credit.



 

 

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls into Baltimore, MD to participate in the Star Spangled Spectacular.

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls into Baltimore, Maryland, to participate in the Star-Spangled Spectacular. Click image for larger view and image credit.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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