Exploring Atlantic Canyons & Seamounts





Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos taken during the Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014 exploration. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information. For video, multiple video formats are available on the linked pages.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Video Clips | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) |
Images (Background Essays)

 


Dive Highlight Videos

Highlights video from Dive 12

video October 4: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 12, Ryan Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 11

video October 1: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 11, Physalia Seamount (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 10

video September 30: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 10, Unnamed Seamount (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 9

video September 29: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 9, Kelvin Seamount (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 8

video September 28: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 8, Gosnold Seamount (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 7

video September 27: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 7, Atlantis II Seamount Complex (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 6

video September 26: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 6, Asterias Seamount...Almost (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 5

video September 25: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 5, Retriever Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 4

video September 23: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 4, East of Veatch Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 3

video September 21: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 3, McMaster Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 2

video September 20: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 2, Hendrickson Canyon (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 13

video September 19: Video Log
Highlight video from Dive 1 on Phoenix Canyon (Video)

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Video Clips

video October 4:
This chimaera swam by for a visit during our dive in Ryan Canyon. (Video)

video October 4:
A king crab eats a pancake urchin in Ryan Canyon. (Video)

video October 1:
A sea spider feeds on a solitary hydroid; seen while exploring Physalia Seamount. (Video)

video October 1:
As we prepared to leave the seafloor at Physalia Seamount, ROV Deep Discoverer came across this octopus. (Video)

video September 29:
On Kelvin Seamount, scientists saw this sea star using its tube feet to "glide" across the seafloor. (Video)

Even though they are rare, we saw dandelion siphonophores, including this one, on three dives during this expedition.

video September 27:
Even though they are rare, we saw dandelion siphonophores on three dives during this expedition. (Video)

video September 27:
While exploring the Atlantis II Seamount Complex, this dumbo octopus was our second cephalopod. (Video)

Chimaera spotted while exploring a seamount within the Atlantis II Seamount Complex.

video September 27:
Chimaera spotted while exploring a seamount within the Atlantis II Seamount Complex. (Video)

During our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex, we caught a brief glimpse of a vampire squid.

video September 27:
During our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex, we caught a brief glimpse of a vampire squid. (Video)

During exploration of Retriever Seamount, scientists imaged a cup coral that had recently captured a small jellyfish for its next meal.

video September 25:
During exploration of Retriever Seamount, scientists imaged a cup coral that had captured a jellyfish. (Video)

This sea spider was seen swimming through the water column during the exploration of the habitats and geomorphology of a minor canyon east of Veatch Canyon.

video September 23:
Sea spider seen swimming during the exploration of a minor canyon east of Veatch Canyon. (Video)

An anglerfish, of which we saw one, and of only nine species and 21 individuals we observed during our dive on Atlantis II (compared to 15 species and 65 individuals observed at the minor canyon east of Veatch).

video September 20:
An anglerfish, one of only nine species and 21 individuals we observed during our dive on Atlantis II. (Video)

An octopus performs for the remotely operated vehicle camera, scaling a wall in Hendrickson Canyon and then succeeding in daringly crossing over a crevice.

video September 20:
An octopus performs for the remotely operated vehicle camera, scaling a wall in Hendrickson Canyon. (Video)

video September 19:
Squid seen during the first ROV dive of this leg, which took place in Phoenix Canyon. (Video)

Octopus seen making his way across the floor of Phoenix Canyon, during the first remotely operated vehicle dive of this leg.

video September 19:
Octopus seen making his way across the floor of Phoenix Canyon. (Video)

While exploring Phoenix Canyon, scientists came across this eel who had recently captured a squid. After a struggle on the seafloor, the eel swam into the sediment cloud, the squid held firmly in its jaws.

video September 19:
While exploring Phoenix Canyon, scientists came across this eel who had recently captured a squid. (Video)

video September 7:
Swarms of squid were seen while diving in Norfolk Canyon; the squid were feeding and being fed upon. (Video)

This octopus, who was anxious to get away from the bright lights of the remotely operated vehicle, was seen while exploring Washington Canyon on September 6, 2014. (Video)

video September 6:
This octopus was seen while exploring Washington Canyon on September 6, 2014. (Video)

Hydromedusa later identified as Cyclocanna welshi. (Video)

video September 6:
Monkfish (or goosefish). (Video)

Hydromedusa later identified as Cyclocanna welshi. (Video)

video September 6:
Hydromedusa later identified as Cyclocanna welshi. (Video)

Hydromedusa seen while exploring Washington Canyon. (Video)

video September 6:
Hydromedusa seen while exploring Washington Canyon. (Video)

During our dive in Washington Canyon, we observed several crabs fight over a recently caught squid. (Video)

video September 6:
During our dive in Washington Canyon, we observed several crabs fight over a recently caught squid. (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Images (Daily Updates)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer docked at her home port in North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

October 7
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer docked at her home port in North Kingstown, Rhode Island. (HR)

During our mid-water transects, ROV Deep Discoverer imaged a dragonfish.

October 6
During our mid-water transects, ROV Deep Discoverer imaged a dragonfish. (HR)

ROV team members take advantage of a small window of decent weather to do maintenance on camera platform Seirios.

October 5
ROV team members do maintenance on camera platform Seirios. (HR)

An eel pout burrows into the soft sediment on the seafloor of Ryan Canyon.

October 4
An eel pout burrows into the soft sediment on the seafloor of Ryan Canyon. (HR)

High winds and high seas are a powerful combination and the reason that Okeanos spent the day inshore, in sheltered waters.

October 3
High winds and seas are a powerful combination and the reason that Okeanos spent the day inshore. (HR)

Rough seas and high winds lead to another canceled dive.

October 2
Rough seas and high winds lead to another canceled dive. (HR)

A highlight of Dive 11 was this pompom anemone, the first one we have seen on this cruise.

October 1
A highlight of Dive 11 was this pompom anemone, the first one we have seen on this cruise. (HR)

Sponges, including this carnivorous sponge, were one of the most abundant fauna during our Dive 10.

September 30
Sponges, including this carnivorous sponge, were one of the most abundant fauna during our Dive 10. (HR)

The ROVs discover a field of bed forms or ripples on a flat area of Kelvin Seamount.

September 29
The ROVs discover a field of bed forms or ripples on a flat area of Kelvin Seamount. (HR)

A large black coral along the edge of a very steep cliff that was heavily encrusted with coral and sponges.

September 28
A large black coral along the edge of a very steep cliff that was heavily encrusted with coral and sponges. (HR)

This dumbo octopus was our second cephalopod of the day and a dive highlight!

September 27
This dumbo octopus was our second cephalopod of the day and a dive highlight! (HR)

With winds over 25 knots, ROV Deep Discoverer had to be recovered before we reached the seafloor on Dive 6.

September 26
With winds over 25 knots, Deep Discoverer had to be recovered before we reached the seafloor on Dive 6. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer investigates a diverse deep-sea coral habitat on Retriever Seamount.

September 25
ROV Deep Discoverer investigates a diverse deep-sea coral habitat on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

Usually hub of activity during a remotely operated vehicle dive, the control room is a bit different during mapping operations.

September 24
Usually hub of activity during an ROV dive, the control room is a bit different during mapping operations. (HR)

Towards the end of Dive 4, ROV Deep Discoverer came upon a unique geological feature that our team dubbed the Octopus Grottoes.

September 23
ROV Deep Discoverer came upon a unique geological feature that our team dubbed the "Octopus Grottoes." (HR)

System display while acquiring submarine canyon mapping data.

September 22
System display while acquiring submarine canyon mapping data. (HR)

A pancake urchin (Hygrosoma sp.) moves across some discarded human debris. McMaster Canyon had the most evidence of human impacts that we have seen yet on this expedition.

September 21
A pancake urchin (Hygrosoma sp.) moves across some discarded human debris. (HR)

Here, an octopus mother protects her eggs in Hendrickson Canyon.

September 20
Here, an octopus mother protects her eggs in Hendrickson Canyon. (HR)

Phoenix Canyon proved to be home to an exciting diversity of mollusks. Here a nudibranch strolls by a bobtail squid.

September 19
Phoenix Canyon proved to be home to a diversity of mollusks. Here a nudibranch strolls by a bobtail squid. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer underway and steaming towards Phoenix Canyon.

September 18
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer underway and steaming towards Phoenix Canyon. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer tied up to the pier, preparing for departure.

September 17
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer tied up to the pier, preparing for departure. (HR)

From September 10-16, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer participated in the Star-Spangled Spectacular. More than 2,000 people visited and toured the ship during our time in Baltimore. Here, Okeanos and National Aquarium visitors view the fireworks display over the Inner Harbor.

September 16
From September 10-16, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer participated in the Star-Spangled Spectacular. (HR)

Stormy skies and seas off the back deck of the Okeanos Explorer.

September 8
Stormy skies and seas off the back deck of the Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

A deep-sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. If you look carefully, you can see a skate egg case on the same branch as the crab and a colony of the white morph of bubblegum coral in the background.

September 7
A deep-sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. (HR)

D2 imaged a beautiful hydromedusa in Washington Canyon. Hydromedusa have red-tinted stomachs to camouflage any bioluminescence exhibited by their prey.

September 6
D2 imaged a beautiful hydromedusa in Washington Canyon. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer as seen from the second part of the two-bodied system, camera sled Seirios.

September 5
ROV Deep Discoverer as seen from the second part of the two-bodied system, camera sled Seirios. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicles Deep Discoverer and Seirios are secured to the deck and ready for the first dive.

September 4
Deep Discoverer and Seirios are secured to the deck and ready for the first dive. (HR)

 

 

 

 

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Images (Mission Logs)

Summary map showing the approximate locations of the 16 ROV dives, the 36,200 km2 of seafloor bathymetry data, and the location of all XBT deployments.

Mission Summary
Summary map showing the approximate locations of ROV dives and collected seafloor bathymetry data. (HR)

During remotely operated vehicle explorations, our extended shore-based science team included over 55 scientists from 23 different states.

Mission Summary
During ROV explorations, the shore-based team included over 55 scientists from 23 different states. (HR)

This image shows a side view, two-times vertical exaggeration, of the unnamed seamount we explored during Dive 10. The white dot represents the point where remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer was deployed.

Mission Summary
Side view, two-times vertical exaggeration, of the unnamed seamount we explored during Dive 10. (HR)

During the first-ever exploration of Nantucket Canyon, we transited up a steep wall and discovered areas of dense populations of cup corals and brisingid sea stars.

Mission Summary
During the first-ever exploration of Nantucket Canyon, we discovered areas with cup corals and brisingid sea stars. (HR)

During Leg 3, our ROV team built and tested D2’s new probe to determine sediment accumulation, which we affectionately dubbed the “Sepoke.” Here, Sepoke is deployed on Gosnold Seamount.

Mission Summary
During Leg 3, our ROV team built and tested D2’s new probe to determine sediment accumulation. (HR)

A spectacular hard rock area with a very high coral diversity, seen during our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex. This one image has black corals, bamboo corals, and several additional octocorals, all living together to form a community.

Mission Summary
A hard rock area with a very high coral diversity, seen during our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer investigates a diverse deep-sea coral habitat on Retriever Seamount.

Mission Summary
ROV Deep Discoverer investigates a diverse deep-sea coral habitat on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

Siphonophores are regular visitors in the midwater. These animals form colonies where groups of individuals carry out specific functions.

Mission Summary
Siphonophores are regular visitors in the midwater. (HR)

Here, an octopus mother protects her eggs in Hendrickson Canyon. If you look closely, you can see the eyes of a baby octopus through the egg.

Mission Summary
Here, an octopus mother protects her eggs in Hendrickson Canyon. (HR)

Even though they are rare, we were lucky enough to see dandelion siphonophores on three dives during this expedition.

Mission Summary
Though they are rare, we were lucky to see dandelion siphonophores on three dives. (HR)

We saw this mysterious organism at 2,035 meters depth on Retriever Seamount, floating 50 meters above bottom. We could offer no other label than strange gelatinous spiked plankton. Steven Haddock, a deep-sea biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, sent an email that evening telling us it was a phaeodarian radiolarian, a type of single-celled protistan that feeds on marine snow.

Mission Summary
A phaeodarian radiolarian, a type of single-celled protistan that feeds on marine snow. (HR)

Although the expedition ends for many of our viewers when Okeanos returns to the dock, the work is just beginning for our science team. This munnopsid isopod was unidentified when we concluded the dive, but was identified by an isopod expert who was unable to participate in the dive live.

Mission Summary
This munnopsid isopod was identified after a dive by an expert who was unable to participate in the dive live. (HR)

Benthic cnidarians are common in the deep-sea canyons and seamounts we are exploring. Here, octocorals, cup corals, and anemones share a rock at 1,459 meters depth in Hendrickson Canyon.

Mission Summary
Benthic cnidarians are common in the deep-sea canyons and seamounts we are exploring. (HR)

A juvenile King Crab in Phoenix Canyon.

Mission Summary
A juvenile King Crab in Phoenix Canyon. (HR)

A rarely documented instance of sea star predation on bamboo coral.

Mission Summary
A rarely documented instance of sea star predation on bamboo coral. (HR)

Although we saw several sea spiders during the expedition, this one feeding on a solitary hydroid was particularly exciting!

Mission Summary
Sea spider feeding on a solitary hydroid. (HR)

Recovery of ROV Deep Discover onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer

Mission Summary
Recovery of ROV Deep Discoverer onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Towards the end of Dive 4, ROV Deep Discoverer came upon a series of caves inhabited by octopuses, which  our team dubbed the Octopus Grottoes.

Mission Summary
Towards the end of Dive 4, ROV Deep Discoverer came upon a series of caves inhabited by octopuses. (HR)

Scientists from NOAA and University of Maryland Eastern Shore participate from NOAA’s Silver Spring Exploration Command Center during our dive at Phoenix Canyon.

Mission Summary
Scientists participate in a dive from NOAA’s Silver Spring Exploration Command Center. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer as seen in the camera lens of Camera Sled Seirios, as the vehicles leave the seafloor from our last dive of the 2014 field season.

Mission Summary
ROV Deep Discoverer leaves the seafloor from our last dive of the 2014 field season. (HR)

During the dive at Gosnold Seamount, D2 descended on a seafloor densely populated with a diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges.

October 6
D2 descends on seafloor densely populated with a diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges. (HR)

A whiplash (Mastigoteuthis) squid waits in the water column while hunting in Phoenix Canyon.

October 6
A whiplash (Mastigoteuthis) squid waits in the water column while hunting in Phoenix Canyon. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer as seen in the camera lens of Camera Sled Seirios, as the vehicles leave the seafloor from our last dive of the 2014 field season.

October 6
ROV Deep Discoverer as seen in the camera lens of Camera Sled Seirios. (HR)

A whiplash (Mastigoteuthis) squid waits in the water column while hunting in Phoenix Canyon.

October 6
A whiplash (Mastigoteuthis) squid waits in the water column while hunting in Phoenix Canyon. (HR)

Even though they are rare, we were lucky enough to see dandelion siphonophores on three dives during this expedition.

October 6
We were lucky enough to see dandelion siphonophores on three dives during this expedition. (HR)

During our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex, we caught a brief glimpse of a vampire squid.

October 6
During our dive on the Atlantis II Seamount Complex, we caught a brief glimpse of a vampire squid. (HR)

The diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges on Gosnold Seamount made the dive here my favorite! Here, ROV Deep Discoverer documents several sponges, precious corals, and other octocorals on a steep outcrop during our transit upslope.

October 6
The diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges on Gosnold Seamount made the dive here my favorite! (HR)

A tiny squat lobster rests in a group of bivalves under a ledge in McMaster Canyon. For scale reference, these bivalves are each about the size of a fist.

October 6
A tiny squat lobster rests in a group of bivalves under a ledge in McMaster Canyon. (HR)

Two hermit crabs on a small boulder on Retriever Seamount. This pair surprised our scientists as these crabs are usually solitary.

October 6
Two hermit crabs on a small boulder on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

Are rarely document instance of sea star predation on bamboo coral.

October 6
A rarely documented instance of sea star predation on bamboo coral. (HR)

In the words of our Telepresence Team Lead, Aliens exist and they’re closer than you think! Sea cucumbers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but almost all of them look they could be extras in the next Men in Black movie.

October 6
Sea cucumbers come in a variety of shapes and sizes. (HR)

A polychaete worm resides on a pancake urchin.

October 6
A polychaete worm resides on a pancake urchin. (HR)

This chimera swam by for a visit during our dive in Ryan Canyon.

October 6
This chimaera swam by for a visit during our dive in Ryan Canyon. (HR)

Throughout our dive on Retriever Seamount, we encountered several xenophyophores (giant unicellular organisms), many of which had brittle stars resting on top.

October 6
Xenophyophore (giant unicellular organism) with a brittle star resting on top. (HR)

The area ROV Deep Discoverer surveyed on Retriever Seamount had a high diversity of sponges, including this one with several crinoids using the sponge to elevate their position in the water column.

October 6
Several crinoids use a sponge to elevate their position in the water column. (HR)

As we prepared to leave the seafloor at Physalia Seamount, ROV Deep Discoverer came across this photogenic octopus. What a great way to end a dive!

October 6
As we prepared to leave the seafloor at Physalia Seamount, we came across this photogenic octopus. (HR)

Although we saw several sea spiders during the expedition, this one feeding on a solitary hydroid was particularly exciting!

October 6
Although we saw several sea spiders, this one feeding on a solitary hydroid was particularly exciting! (HR)

During the first-ever exploration of Nantucket Canyon, we transited up a steep wall and discovered areas of dense populations of cup corals and brisingid sea stars.

October 6
In Nantucket Canyon, we discovered areas of dense populations of cup corals and brisingid sea stars. (HR)

Close up of a blue hake.

October 6
Close up of a blue hake. (HR)

One of the most beautiful deep sea corals, iridogorgia (a type of octocoral) creates large spirals as it grows. This coral was fairly common during our dives on the New England Seamounts.

October 6
One of the most beautiful deep-sea corals, iridogorgia, creates large spirals as it grows. (HR)

A rare sun star on Gosnold Seamount.

October 6
A rare sun star on Gosnold Seamount. (HR)

A king crab eats a pancake urchin in Ryan Canyon.

October 6
A king crab eats a pancake urchin in Ryan Canyon. (HR)

Nudibranchs on a large hydroid colony.  Nudibranchs are some of my favorite animals to see while scuba diving and these were my first deep sea nudibranchs!

October 6
Nudibranchs on a large hydroid colony. (HR)

#5 - Atlantis II Seamounts Inter-flow Carbonate Layer

October 5
#5 - Atlantis II Seamounts Inter-flow Carbonate Layer (HR)

Kelvin Seamount Pillow Lava Drainbacks

October 5
#4 - Kelvin Seamount Pillow Lava Drainbacks (HR)

#3: Hendrickson Canyon Sedimentary Contact

October 5
#3: Hendrickson Canyon Sedimentary Contact (HR)

#2 - Unnamed Canyon Octopus Grotto

October 5
#2 - Unnamed Canyon Octopus Grotto (HR)

#1 - Physalia Seamount Volcaniclastic Breccias

October 5
#1 - Physalia Seamount Volcaniclastic Breccias (HR)

Benthic cnidarians come in all different shapes and sizes.

October 4
Benthic cnidarians come in all different shapes and sizes. (HR)

Benthic cnidarians are common in the deep-sea canyons and seamounts we are exploring.

October 4
Benthic cnidarians are common in the deep-sea canyons and seamounts we are exploring. (HR)

A pair of “true” sea anemones attached to the side of a rock at 2,125 meters depth on Retriever Seamount.

October 4
A pair of “true” sea anemones attached to a rock at 2,125 meters depth on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

A cluster of corallimorphs on a steep wall at 1,490 meters depth in Hendrickson Canyon.

October 4
A cluster of corallimorphs on a steep wall at 1,490 meters depth in Hendrickson Canyon. (HR)

A cerianthid tube anemone in its flexible, felt-like tube at 1,510 meters depth in an unnamed canyon east of Veatch Canyon.

October 4
A cerianthid tube anemone in its flexible, felt-like tube at 1,510 meters depth in an unnamed canyon. (HR)

A colony of sand-colored zoanthid polyps overgrows an octocoral skeleton at 2,046 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount

October 4
A colony of sand-colored zoanthid polyps overgrows an octocoral skeleton on Kelvin Seamount. (HR)

A pair of cup corals (Scleractinia) grow from the wall of an unnamed canyon east of Veatch Canyon at 1,480 meters depth.

October 4
A pair of cup corals grow from the wall of an unnamed canyon east of Veatch Canyon at 1,480 meters depth. (HR)

A small colony of the black coral Bathypathes at 2,004 meters depth on Retriever Seamount.

October 4
A small colony of the black coral Bathypathes at 2,004 meters depth on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

The tip of a bamboo coral (Lepidisis sp.) colony reaches off the seafloor at 2,048 m depth on Kelvin Seamount.

October 4
The tip of a bamboo coral colony reaches off the seafloor at 2,048 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount. (HR)

Close-up of a sea pen colony at 2,023 meters depth on Retriever Seamount.

October 4
Close-up of a sea pen colony at 2,023 meters depth on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

A giant solitary hydroid at 2,046 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount.

October 4
A giant solitary hydroid at 2,046 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount. (HR)

Ever looked at the Okeanos Explorer live video feeds when we're mapping and wonder what this is? It's our multibeam system collecting real-time seafloor data!

October 3
Okeanos Explorer's multibeam system collecting real-time seafloor data! (HR)

This image shows a side view (two-times vertical exaggeration of the unnamed seamount we explored during Dive 10.) The white dot represents the point where remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer was deployed.

October 3
Side view, two-times vertical exaggeration, of the unnamed seamount we explored during Dive 10. (HR)

Emily uses the ship's alidade to take visual bearings while navigating terrestrially, or when the ship is close enough to land to use terrestrial landmarks.

October 2
Emily uses the ship's alidade to take visual bearings when the ship is close to land.

Midwater video sampling during the expedition caught a glimpse of this medusa, Periphylla sp.

October 1
Midwater video sampling during the expedition caught a glimpse of this medusa, Periphylla sp. (HR)

Siphonophores are regular visitors in the midwater. These animals form communities where each individual has a specialty.

October 1
Siphonophores are regular visitors in the midwater. (HR)

High-definition video of salps like these Salpa sp. were found in layers on most of the dives on this expedition.

October 1
High-definition video of salps like these Salpa sp. were found in layers on most of the dives on this expedition. (HR)

Ctenophores, very common on the continental shelf and in estuaries along the U.S. East Coast, are also found in the canyons.

October 1
Ctenophores, common on the continental shelf and estuaries along the U.S. East Coast, are also found in canyons. (HR)

Science Lead Scott France and Assistant Scientist Susan Schnur hard at work in the control room at the end of a dive.

September 30
Scott France and Susan Schnur hard at work in the control room at the end of a dive. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer is recovered after an extended dive.

September 30
ROV Deep Discoverer is recovered after an extended dive. (HR)

We saw this mysterious organism at 2,035 meters depth on Retriever Seamount, floating 50 meters above bottom.

September 29
We saw this mysterious organism at 2,035 meters depth on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

We spotted this interesting looking fish in Phoenix Canyon at 1,109 meters depth on Dive 01.

September 29
We spotted this interesting looking fish in Phoenix Canyon at 1,109 meters depth on Dive 01. (HR)

This image of a cutthroat eel with a captured squid nicely shows predator-prey interactions in the deep sea.

September 28
Cutthroat eel with a captured squid nicely shows predator-prey interactions in the deep sea. (HR)

This image of a cutthroat eel with a captured squid nicely shows predator-prey interactions in the deep sea.

September 28
Here you can see three oreo fish (Neocyttus) encountered during Dive 04 in a minor canyon east of Veatch. (HR)

These barnacles living on a bamboo coral (Isidella) were quickly identified as belonging to the genus Glyptelasma by Dr. Les Watling (University of Hawaii) who typed the identification into the instant messaging chatroom (“eventlog”) as we imaged them.

September 29
These barnacles living on a bamboo coral were quickly identified as belonging to the genus Glyptelasma. (HR)

A nice topside view of the bell of C. welshi.

September 27
A nice topside view of the bell of C. welshi. (HR)

The schooner, Grampus.

September 27
The schooner, Grampus.

Here you can see some of the diagnostic features of C. welshi.

September 27
Here you can see some of the diagnostic features of C. welshi. (HR)

Chondraster grandis (Poraniidae)

September 25
We imaged a cup coral that had recently captured a small jellyfish for its next meal. (HR)

At the Mystic Aquarium Command Center, Peter Auster, Rhian Waller, Emily Duwan, and Steve Auscavitch watch a dive on Retriever Seamount.

September 25
At the Mystic Aquarium Command Center, scientists watch a dive on Retriever Seamount. (HR)

Here, two colonies of black coral have made their home next to a spiraled Iridogorgia octocoral.

September 25
Here, two colonies of black coral have made their home next to a spiraled Iridogorgia octocoral. (HR)

One spectacular hard rock area had a very high coral diversity during this dive.

September 25
One spectacular hard rock area had a very high coral diversity during this dive. (HR)

A cup coral shows off its translucent orange tentacles, filled with nematocysts - stinging cells they use to capture prey.

September 25
A cup coral shows off its translucent orange tentacles, filled with nematocysts. (HR)

Sub-bottom profiling system mapping buried sediments and rock.

September 24
Sub-bottom profiling system mapping buried sediments and rock. (HR)

Map of landslide location, morphology, and sedimentary structure.

September 24
Map of landslide location, morphology, and sedimentary structure. (HR)

Chondraster grandis (Poraniidae)

September 22
Chondraster grandis (Poraniidae) (HR)

Neomorphaster forcipatus (Stichasteridae)

September 22
Neomorphaster forcipatus (Stichasteridae) (HR)

Brisingid Sea Stars

September 22
Brisingid Sea Stars (HR)

Evoplosoma sp. (Goniasteridae)

September 22
Evoplosoma sp. (Goniasteridae) (HR)

Ceramaster granularis? (Goniasteridae)

September 22
Ceramaster granularis? (Goniasteridae) (HR)

Peribolaster or unknown?

September 22
Peribolaster or unknown? (HR)

Lophaster?

September 22
Lophaster? (HR)

Henricia sp. 1

September 22
Henricia sp. 1 (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer investigates an unexplored canyon wall.

September 21
Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer investigates an unexplored canyon wall. (HR)

The view from the control room as Deep Discoverer collects high-resolution imagery of a deep-sea sponge.

September 21
The view from the control room as Deep Discoverer collects high-resolution imagery of a deep-sea sponge. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in port.

September 18
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in port. (HR)

Shortly after arriving in Baltimore, remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer was off-loaded from Okeanos Explorer to the pier that would be its home for the next few days.

September 16
Deep Discoverer was off-loaded from Okeanos Explorer to the pier that would be its home for the next few days. (HR)

Over 2,100 people visited Okeanos Explorer during our time in Baltimore.

September 16
Over 2,100 people visited Okeanos Explorer during our time in Baltimore. (HR)

NOAA Administrator Kathy Sullivan and Chief Scientist Rick Spinrad demonstrate the value of mapping efforts sponsored by the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research off the U.S. East Coast to Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD).

September 16
Kathy Sullivan and Rick Spinrad demonstrate value of mapping off East Coast to Senator Barbara Mikulski. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer’s officers received a visit from Captain Barnacles and Kwazii when the Octonauts joined our team in Baltimore.

September 16
Okeanos Explorer’s officers received a visit from the Octonauts Captain Barnacles and Kwazii Kitten. (HR)

On the way into Baltimore, a cameraman from CBS's 60 Minutes filmed Okeanos Explorer from NOAA Ship Bay Hydro II.

September 16
A cameraman from CBS's 60 Minutes filmed Okeanos Explorer from NOAA Ship Bay Hydro II. (HR)

NOAA Administrator Kathy Sullivan tours Okeanos Explorer.

September 16
NOAA Administrator Kathy Sullivan tours Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Mapping team lead Meme Lobecker explains how Okeanos Explorer sonar systems acquire data

September 16
Mapping team lead Meme Lobecker explains how Okeanos Explorer sonar systems acquire data. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer remotely operate vehicle (ROV) team lead, Dave Lovalvo, describes ROV operations and the mechanics of the vehicles to a group of U.S. Naval Academy ocean engineering students.

September 16
ROV team lead, Dave Lovalvo, describes operations to a group of U.S. Naval Academy students. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer docked at the National Aquarium during her stay in Baltimore.

September 16
Okeanos Explorer docked at the National Aquarium during her stay in Baltimore. (HR)

Roland Brian gives a tour of the control room and describes how ROV operations are conducted onboard Okeanos Explorer.

September 16
Roland Brian gives a tour of the control room and describes how ROV operations are conducted. (HR)

The view from Okeanos Explorer for the Star-Spangled Spectacular fireworks.

September 16
The view from Okeanos Explorer for the Star-Spangled Spectacular fireworks. (HR)

To kick off the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Sail Baltimore hosted a parade of ships which included tall ships

September 16
To kick off the Star-Spangled Spectacular, Sail Baltimore hosted a parade of ships which included tall ships (HR)

Staff from our hosts, the National Aquarium, welcome Okeanos to Baltimore.

September 16
Staff from our hosts, the National Aquarium, welcome Okeanos to Baltimore. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls into Baltimore, MD to participate in the Star Spangled Spectacular.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Okeanos Explorer pulls into Baltimore, Maryland, to participate in the Star-Spangled Spectacular. (HR)

This beautiful hydromedusa was imaged in Washington Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
This beautiful hydromedusa was imaged in Washington Canyon. (HR)

One of the many blackbelly rosefish remotely operated vehicle <em>Deep Discoverer</em> encountered in Washington Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
One of the many blackbelly rosefish Deep Discoverer encountered in Washington Canyon. (HR)

A skate rests along the wall of Washington Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
A skate rests along the wall of Washington Canyon. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer’s lights drew a swarm of small crustaceans, and this anemone took full advantage of the free meal. Here amphipods are captured by the specially adapted stinging cells, called nematocysts, on the anemone’s tentacle.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Amphipods are captured by specially adapted stinging cells on the anemone’s tentacles. (HR)

Soft sedimented seafloor with anemones and red crabs was a typical landscape of the area we surveyed in Washington Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Soft seafloor with anemones and red crabs was a typical landscape of Washington Canyon. (HR)

Food is a valuable commodity in the deep sea. Here three crabs fight over a squid for  their next meal.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Food is a valuable commodity in the deep sea. Here three crabs fight over a squid for their next meal. (HR)

Cephopods on parade! In Washington Canyon we saw several octopods and squid. Here a small octopus is photobombed by a squid.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
In Washington Canyon, we saw several octopods and squid. Here, a small octopus is photobombed by a squid. (HR)

Camera Sled Seirios encounters a school of squid while ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Washington Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Seirios encounters a school of squid while ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Washington Canyon. (HR)

One of the large colonies of bubblegum coral ROV Deep Discoverer imaged in Norfolk Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
One of the large colonies of bubblegum coral ROV Deep Discoverer imaged in Norfolk Canyon. (HR)

A deep-sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. If you look carefully, you can see a skate egg case on the same branch as the crab and a colony of the white morph of bubblegum coral in the background.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
A deep-sea red crab hangs out on a bubblegum coral. (HR)

The steep ledges of Norfolk canyon proved to be home to a large diversity of life. Here a batstar resides on the wall next to a colony of deepsea octocoral and sponges. The arm of several brittle stars can also be seen poking out of the sediment.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
The steep ledges of Norfolk Canyon proved to be home to a large diversity of life. (HR)

The ROV team spends some time on the back deck planning for the next day’s dive.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
The ROV team spends some time on the back deck planning for the next day’s dive. (HR)

Todd Gregory introduces new personnel to the remotely operated vehicles.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Todd Gregory introduces new personnel to the remotely operated vehicles. (HR)

Jesse Aussebell, Jamie Austin, and Melissa Ryan engage with the shore-side science team during an ROV dive.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Jesse Aussebell, Jamie Austin, and Melissa Ryan engage with the shore-side science team during an ROV dive. (HR)

The view from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer’s control room as ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Norfolk Canyon.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
The view from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer’s control room as ROV Deep Discoverer investigates Norfolk Canyon. (HR)

Staff at the National Aquarium welcomes Okeanos Explorer to Baltimore, MD.

Leg 2 Highlight Images
Staff at the National Aquarium welcomes Okeanos Explorer to Baltimore, Maryland. (HR)

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Images (Background Essays)

Map showing areas that will be explored during the second and third legs of the Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts 2014 expedition.

Mission Introduction
Map showing areas that will be explored during the second and third legs of the expedition. (HR)

During the Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013, ROV Deep Discoverer investigated Mytilus Seamount. Corals were diverse on Mytilus Seamount, but the composition and abundance of corals differed between the north and south side of the seamount. We observed this colony of Jasonisis, a bamboo coral, with numerous crinoid associates. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Mission Plan
Colony of bamboo coral seen in 2013 on Mytilus Seamount. (HR)

Diverse deep-sea coral and sponge habitats were imaged in the canyons explored during the Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition 2013.

Mission Plan
Diverse deep-sea coral and sponge habitats were imaged in the canyons explored in 2013. (HR)

One of the numerous commercially important Atlantic deep-sea red crab mating pairs seen by ROV Deep Discoverer during the 2013 Northeast US Canyons Expedition. The male crab is carrying the inverted female.

Mission Plan
One of the numerous commercially important Atlantic deep-sea red crab mating pairs seen in 2013. (HR)

During the 2013 exploration of the New England Seamount Chain, Okeanos Explorer discovered a previously unknown seamount.

Mission Plan
In 2013, Okeanos Explorer discovered a seamount in the New England Seamount Chain.

Map showing the area where the Okeanos Explorer will conduct operations during the Shakedown and Mapping New England Seamounts expedition.

Leg 1 Summary
Map showing the area where the Okeanos Explorer conducted operations during Leg 1. (HR)

The ROV Deep Discoverer hovers over a wall at almost three kilometers depth on the southern slope of Mytilus Seamount.

Exploring Our Deepwater Backyard
The ROV hovers over a wall on the southern slope of Mytilus Seamount. (HR)

A large Jasonisis bamboo coral, re-growing upwards after falling over.

Exploring Our Deepwater Backyard
A large Jasonisis bamboo coral, re-growing upwards after falling over. (HR)

Currents sweep past an overhang of rock at 1,152 meters depth in Oceanographer Canyon.

Exploring Our Deepwater Backyard
Currents sweep past an overhang of rock in Oceanographer Canyon. (HR)

Several paramuriceid seafans (octocorals) live near the edge of a cliff wall at 1,136 meters depth in Oceanographer Canyon.

Exploring Our Deepwater Backyard
Several paramuriceid seafans live near a cliff edge in Oceanographer Canyon. (HR)

Lava flows can have different morphologies based on how quickly they were extruded.

Marine Geologic Puzzle
Lava flows can have different morphologies based on how quickly they were extruded. (HR)

Manganese crust is a type of deposit that crystallizes out of seawater.

Marine Geologic Puzzle
Manganese crust is a type of deposit that crystallizes out of seawater.

Strong currents can flow around seamounts, leaving ripple marks on sandy slopes.

Marine Geologic Puzzle
Strong currents can flow around seamounts, leaving ripple marks on sandy slopes. (HR)

A contact is a sharp boundary between two geologic units.

Marine Geologic Puzzle
A contact is a sharp boundary between two geologic units. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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