Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with or taken during the Southeast Deep Coral Initiative: Exploring Deep-Sea Coral Ecosystems off the Southeast U.S. expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Images

A goosefish (Lophiodes beroe) encountered on low relief hard bottom seafloor at 415 meters depth at Long Mound on the West Florida Shelf. August 14
A goosefish encountered on low relief hard bottom seafloor at 415 meters depth at Long Mound on the West Florida Shelf. (HR)

Much of the seafloor of Long Mound is eroded carbonate that has been colonized by invertebrates such as tubeworms, leaving a pitted look. August 14
Much of the seafloor of Long Mound is eroded carbonate colonized by invertebrates such as tubeworms, leaving a pitted look. (HR)

A squat lobster hangs off the Long Mound carbonate ledge with a garden of tubeworms and a cup coral at 415 meters depth on the West Florida Shelf. August 14
A squat lobster hangs off the Long Mound carbonate ledge with a garden of tubeworms and a cup coral. (HR)

A section of carbonate ledge running through the target sites of discovery for the Southeast Deep Coral Initiative expedition. August 14
A section of carbonate ledge running through the target sites of discovery for the expedition. (HR)

Paul Sancore, BGL Leslie Allen, and Erik Hodges readying the ROV Odysseus, operated by Pelagic Research Services, to descend in a survey on the West Florida Shelf. August 13
Paul Sancore, BGL Leslie Allen, and Erik Hodges readying the ROV Odysseus to descend in a survey on the West Florida Shelf. (HR)

Surface current speed in the Gulf of Mexico in July-August 2017. Red colors indicate the fastest currents. August 13
Surface current speed in the Gulf of Mexico in July-August 2017. Red colors indicate the fastest currents.

NOAA Ship Nancy Foster stationed above the West Florida Shelf during ROV surveys. August 13
NOAA Ship Nancy Foster stationed above the West Florida Shelf during ROV surveys. (HR)

Image of a bamboo coral captured by the ROV Odysseus near Long Mound on the West Florida Shelf at 412 meters depth. August 13
Image of a bamboo coral captured by the ROV Odysseus near Long Mound on the West Florida Shelf at 412 meters depth. (HR)

NOAA Ship Nancy Foster, which will support the 18-day mission to map, survey, and sample deep-sea coral ecosystems off the Southeast United States. Mission Plan
NOAA Ship Nancy Foster will support the 18-day mission to study deep-sea coral ecosystems off the Southeast United States. (HR)

The ROV Odysseus, operated by Pelagic Research Services, will be used to survey seafloor areas on the West Florida Shelf that are predicted to have high densities of deep-sea corals and sponges. Mission Plan
ROV Odysseus will survey seafloor areas on the West Florida Shelf predicted to have high densities of corals and sponges. (HR)

Map showing the operational area of the 2017 SEDCI expedition aboard NOAA Ship Nancy Foster, which will consist of two legs with different focus areas. Mission Plan
Map showing the operational area of the 2017 SEDCI expedition, which will consist of two legs with different focus areas. (HR)

The CTD Niskin bottle carousel of NOAA Ship Nancy Foster will be used to collect environmental data and water samples for studies on seawater carbonate chemistry. Mission Plan
The CTD Niskin bottle carousel of NOAA Ship Nancy Foster will be used to collect environmental data and water samples. (HR)

Map showing the three geographic regions in which the Southeast Deep Coral Initiative (SEDCI) will operate in 2016-2019. SEDCI
Map showing the three geographic regions in which the Southeast Deep Coral Initiative (SEDCI) will operate in 2016-2019. (HR)

A diverse assemblage of deep-sea corals on the West Florida Escarpment at a depth of 1,800 meters. SEDCI
A diverse assemblage of deep-sea corals on the West Florida Escarpment at a depth of 1,800 meters. (HR)

A dense aggregation of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa at 500 meters depth in the northern Gulf of Mexico. SEDCI
A dense aggregation of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa at 500 meters depth in the northern Gulf of Mexico. (HR)

Lophelia reef on the west Florida slope with several golden crabs scavenging on the dead coral matrix. Deep-sea Corals
Lophelia reef on the west Florida slope with several golden crabs scavenging on the dead coral matrix.

Photograph of a large colony of a deep-sea bamboo coral taken south of Florida. The coral colony was over one meter wide. Deep-sea Corals
Photograph of a large colony of a deep-sea bamboo coral taken south of Florida. The coral colony was over one meter wide. (HR)

This image shows a diversity of deep-sea coral species, including two species of octocorals, or sea fans (Paramuricea in yellow and Callogorgia in light gray), one species of stony coral (Lophelia pertusa in white), and a brittle star (Asteroschema). Deep-sea Corals
A diversity of deep-sea coral species, including two species of octocorals, one species of stony coral, and a brittle star. (HR)

Deep-sea black coral, Leiopathes glaberrima, with commensal galatheoid crab photographed at 300 meters depth in the Gulf of Mexico. Deep-sea Corals
Deep-sea black coral with commensal galatheoid crab photographed at 300 meters depth in the Gulf of Mexico.

Photograph of deep-sea coral and a squat lobster on the West Florida Shelf at a depth of 550 meters. Management Importance
Photograph of deep-sea coral and a squat lobster on the West Florida Shelf at a depth of 550 meters. (HR)

Schematic showing different management categories of fishery resources. The ecological importance and need to manage fishery resources in each category increases from left to right. Management Importance
Schematic showing different management categories of fishery resources. (HR)

Map showing areas on the West Florida Shelf that are currently being considered as potential habitat areas of particular concern by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. Management Importance
Areas on the West Florida Shelf being considered as potential habitat areas of particular concern by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. (HR)

Map showing areas in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico where fishing with bottom contact gear is restricted. Management Importance
Map showing areas in the Exclusive Economic Zone of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico where fishing with bottom contact gear is restricted. (HR)

Map of the shelf and slope off the west coast of Florida showing areas that have previously been mapped using multibeam echosounders (in green). Much of the area has yet to be mapped and will be mapped for the first time during the present expedition aboard NOAA Ship Nancy Foster. Mapping
Map of the shelf and slope off the west coast of Florida showing areas that have previously been mapped using multibeam echosounders. (HR)

Multibeam echosounders map the seafloor by emitting a beam of sound from the hull of the ship and recording the sound signal after it is reflected off the seafloor. Mapping
Multibeam echosounders map the seafloor by emitting a beam of sound and recording the sound signal after it is reflected off the seafloor. (HR)

Examples of real-time maps produced by multibeam echosounders during a previous expedition that mapped Pinellas II, an artificial reef that is part of the Pinellas County artificial reef program. The maps show the sunken tugboat Sheridan at the bottom of the seafloor. Mapping
Examples of real-time maps produced by multibeam echosounders during a previous expedition that mapped an artificial reef. (HR)

Scamp, snowy grouper, and other fish swimming amongst Oculina coral thickets. The Oculina Bank
Scamp, snowy grouper, and other fish swimming amongst Oculina coral thickets. (HR)

Map of the Oculina Bank Habitat Area of Particular Concern (HAPC) and Oculina Bank Experimental Closed Area. The Oculina Bank
Map of the Oculina Bank Habitat Area of Particular Concern and Oculina Bank Experimental Closed Area. (HR)

Black sea bass, scamp, and gag swimming around Oculina coral. The Oculina Bank
Black sea bass, scamp, and gag swimming around Oculina coral.

Example map depicting the predicted likelihood of suitable habitat for Lophelia pertusa in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico from a habitat suitability model. Warmer colors indicate areas predicted to be more likely to contain suitable habitat. Modeling Habitat
Example map depicting the predicted likelihood of suitable habitat for Lophelia pertusa in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico from a habitat suitability model. (HR)

Examples of response curves showing the relationship between the predicted likelihood of habitat suitability (y-axis) and the values (x-axis) for datasets describing environmental conditions. Modeling Habitat
Examples of response curves showing the relationship between the predicted likelihood of habitat suitability and the values for datasets describing environmental conditions. (HR)

 

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