Rosebud vent site as seen during its discovery in 2002. The well-developed faunal communities documented 12 years earlier (in 1990) at Rose Garden were apparently buried by a new lava flow just prior to 2002.  The Rosebud site, approximately 200 meters northwest of Rose Garden, supported vent animal communities that are presently in the early stages of development.  The largest Riftia tubeworms shown here, all less than 2 feet-tall, colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of fresh lava.
Calyfield
Image courtesy of Tim Shank, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, NOAA OE. Download larger version (jpg, 320 KB).

Rosebud vent site as seen during its discovery in 2002. The well-developed faunal communities documented 12 years earlier (in 1990) at Rose Garden were apparently buried by a new lava flow just prior to 2002. The Rosebud site, approximately 200 meters northwest of Rose Garden, supported vent animal communities that are presently in the early stages of development. The largest Riftia tubeworms shown here, all less than 2 feet-tall, colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of fresh lava.

Learn more