Methane hydrate is stable to the left of the purple curve on this temperature-depth plot.  Each 100-meter (~328-foot) increase in water depth corresponds to a pressure increase of ~10 megapascals (~98 atmospheres). The blue curve shows the ocean temperatures measured by the conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor on the Deep Discoverer ROV during Dive 17 at Horn Dome. The sediment temperatures are estimated based on a study that examined nearby well data. Gas hydrate is stable at the seafloor, in the shallow sediments, and from the seafloor to ~600 meters depth in the water column. Such conditions are typical for the deep ocean, but the Gulf of Mexico leaks such large volumes of gas that near-seafloor gas hydrate is more common there than in most locations. Diagram provided by C. Ruppel, U.S. Geological Survey.

Methane hydrate is stable to the left of the purple curve on this temperature-depth plot. Each 100-meter (~328-foot) increase in water depth corresponds to a pressure increase of ~10 megapascals (~98 atmospheres). The blue curve shows the ocean temperatures measured by the conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor on the Deep Discoverer ROV during Dive 17 at Horn Dome. The sediment temperatures are estimated based on a study that examined nearby well data. Gas hydrate is stable at the seafloor, in the shallow sediments, and from the seafloor to ~600 meters depth in the water column. Such conditions are typical for the deep ocean, but the Gulf of Mexico leaks such large volumes of gas that near-seafloor gas hydrate is more common there than in most locations. Diagram provided by C. Ruppel, U.S. Geological Survey.

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