2017 Laulima O Ka Moana






Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana: Exploring Deep Monument Waters Around Johnston Atoll expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2017 Laulima O Ka Moana.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) | Images (Background Essays)

 


Highlight Videos

Two cusk eels seen while exploring Keli Ridge on July 18, 2017.

video Dive 06: A Couple of Cusk Eels
Two cusk eels seen while exploring "Keli" Ridge on July 18, 2017. (Video)

 

 

 

While exploring the north ridge of a guyot-like feature at 2,170 meters (~7,120 feet) depth, scientists were surprised to see this scale worm, which measured nearly 10 centimeters (four inches) long, as they had not seen a scale worm this large in such shallow water.

video Dive 05: Deep-sea Scale Worm
Scientists were surprised to see this scale worm, which measured nearly 10 centimeters long in such shallow water. (Video)

An octocoral and zooanthids compete for space, in a battle to survive in the deep ocean. Seen during Dive 04 to explore along Johnston Atoll at a depth of 600 meters (~1,970 feet).

video Dive 04: Battle for Survival
DAn octocoral and zooanthids compete for space, in a battle to survive in the deep ocean. (Video)

This rarely seen sorceress eel was observed during Dive 03 to explore an unnamed seamount north of Johnston Atoll at a depth of ~2,400 meters (7,875 feet).

video Dive 03: Sorceress Eel
This sorceress eel was observed during Dive 03 to explore an unnamed seamount north of Johnston Atoll. (Video)

While exploring Horizon Guyot, a seamount located north of Johnston Atoll, scientists observed a seafloor community dominated by several species of hexactinellid – or glass – sponges.

video Dive 02: Glass Animals
While exploring Horizon Guyot, scientists observed a seafloor community dominated by hexactinellid – or glass – sponges. (Video)

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Images (Daily Updates)

Map showing the bathymetry data acquired during our July 2017 cruise in the vicinity of “Keli” Ridge and “Edmondson” Seamount.

July 20
Map of bathymetry data acquired in the vicinity of “Keli” Ridge and “Edmondson” Seamount. (HR)

Three-dimensional perspective view of high-resolution bathymetric data in the vicinity of “Keli” ridge

July 20
Three-dimensional perspective view of high-resolution bathymetric data in the vicinity of “Keli” ridge. (HR)

A short between the conductors in the .68 cable, located 2,850 meters (9,350 feet) up the cable, caused a power loss to the vehicles yesterday.

July 19
A short between the conductors in the .68 cable caused a power loss to the vehicles yesterday. (HR)

 

Image showing the first cut of the .68 cable, at 2,700 meters (8,858 feet).

July 19
Image showing the first cut of the .68 cable, at 2,700 meters (8,858 feet). (HR)

NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> Operations Officer, LT Aaron Colohon, shakes Commanding Officer, CDR Eric Johnson’s hand following successful recovery of the remotely operated vehicle (ROV). All power and communications to the vehicle were lost during the dive, making recovery more complicated than usual. Next to them, Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration ROV Dive Supervisor, Dan Rogers, oversees operations on the aft deck following recovery.

July 18
Operations Officer LT Aaron Colohon shakes Commanding Officer CDR Eric Johnson’s hand following recovery of the ROV. (HR)

Potential new species of black coral that was collected.

July 17
Potential new species of black coral that was collected. (HR)

Undescribed species of comb jelly identified by Dhugal Lindsay as Intacta.

July 17
Undescribed species of comb jelly identified by Dhugal Lindsay as "Intacta." (HR)

Mapping Watchstander, Neah Baechler, prepares to put the expendable bathythermograph (XBT) equipment away after deploying an XBT. XBTs are launched every ~2-6 hours to acquire temperature  data of the water column down to 760 meters (2,493 feet). These data are used to estimate water column refraction required for multibeam sonar data.

July 16
Neah Baechler prepares to put the expendable bathythermograph (XBT) equipment away after deploying an XBT. (HR)

Expedition Mapping Lead, Mashkoor Malik, works on planning the mapping lines the ship will run today since the weather is too poor to dive. Behind him, Survey Technician Charlie Wilkins edits recently acquired multibeam data.

July 16
Mashkoor Malik works on planning the mapping lines the ship will run today since the weather is too poor to dive. (HR)

Dense bed of glass sponges (Farrea nr occa?) covering the vertical face of a large block.

July 15
Dense bed of glass sponges covering the vertical face of a large block. (HR)

Karstic carbonate formations where numerous colonies of the precious red coral (Hemicorallium sp.) were discovered.

July 15
Karstic carbonate formations where numerous colonies of the precious red coral were discovered. (HR)

A rare observation of the sea star Gilbertaster anacanthus.

July 15
A rare observation of the sea star Gilbertaster anacanthus. (HR)

The dive started on a flat bottom of moderately large manganese nodules covering a lighter-colored sediment primarily occupied by large hexactinellid sponges approximately 0.5 to 1 meter tall.

July 14
The dive started on a flat bottom of manganese nodules over sediment occupied by glass sponges. (HR)

A highlight of the midwater transects were the numerous larvacean houses observed, many with the original larvacean present.

July 14
A highlight of the midwater transects were the numerous larvacean houses observed. (HR)

Onboard science leads Drs. Chris Mah and Chris Kelley and NOAA  Educational Partnership Program Intern Nikola Rodriguez discuss and take a closer look at deepwater habitats explored with remotely operated vehicle <em>Deep Discoverer</em> on Horizon Guyot.

July 13
Onboard science leads discuss deepwater habitats explored on Horizon Guyot. (HR)

A large spatangoid urchin with prominent spines was observed in conjunction with sediment traces on a large sediment bed.

July 13
A large spatangoid urchin with prominent spines was observed in conjunction with sediment traces on a large sediment bed. (HR)

The crew leveraged the extra time during our transit to conduct a man-overboard safety drill and train new personnel. Here, the ship is maneuvered to recover a buoy thrown overboard and used as practice to test man-overboard recovery skills.

July 12
The crew leveraged the extra time during our transit to conduct a man-overboard safety drill and train new personnel. (HR)

With approximately 95 percent of the ocean unexplored, the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research pursues every opportunity to map, sample, explore, and survey at planned destinations as well as during transits; 'Always Exploring' is a guiding principle. Mapping data is collected at all times when the ship is transiting and underway. This image shows the multibeam bathymetry data acquired during the ship's transit west from Oahu to the Johnston Atoll Unit.

July 11
Multibeam bathymetry data acquired during the ship's transit west from Oahu to the Johnston Atoll Unit. (HR)

Image of the starboard aft deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer leaving Oahu and beginning a more than two-day transit to the Johnston Atoll Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

July 10
Okeanos Explorer leaving Oahu and beginning a two-day transit to the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. (HR)

Kongsberg DP Technician, Michael Neal, verifies input signals to the ship's dynamic positioning system after upgrades were made during the ship's dry dock period.

July 9
Kongsberg DP Technician, Michael Neal, verifies input signals to the ship's dynamic positioning system. (HR)

Learn more about what a multibeam patch test is and what it consists of by reviewing this poster developed by Okeanos Explorer mapping interns in 2010.

July 8
Learn about a multibeam patch test by reviewing this poster developed by Okeanos mapping interns. (HR)

Picture of the sailing board on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer showing the date and time of departure for the next cruise and the time by which all personnel who are sailing need to be physically on board the ship to sail. Cruise EX-17-06 departed on time at 0900 on Friday, July 7, as planned.

July 7
Picture of the sailing board on the Okeanos Explorer showing the date and time of departure for the next cruise. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls away from the fuel pier and prepares to depart Pearl Harbor to commence Part I of the Laulima O Ka Moana Expedition – shakedown operations offshore of Oahu.

July 7
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls away from the fuel pier and prepares to depart Pearl Harbor. (HR)

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Images (Mission Logs)

AB James Scott secures remotely operated vehicle Seirios on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

July 20
AB James Scott secures remotely operated vehicle Seirios on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The Deck Team safely recovers the remotely operated vehicles after a dive. This is a coordinated effort that requires a lot of skill and training.

July 20
The Deck Team safely recovers the remotely operated vehicles after a dive. (HR)

 

 

For AB James Scott, handling scientific equipment safely is a top priority.

July 20
For AB James Scott, handling scientific equipment safely is a top priority. (HR)

Chief Steward, Mike Sapien, hard at work, making sure the crew of 49 aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer is well fed.

July 19
Chief Steward, Mike Sapien, making sure the Okeanos crew is well fed. (HR)

Chief Steward, Mike Sapien; Second Cook, Will Johnson; and Chief Cook, Ray Capati in the galley aboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

July 19
Chief Steward, Mike Sapien; Second Cook, Will Johnson; and Chief Cook, Ray Capati in the galley. (HR)

Annie White hard at work, clipping video.

July 18
Tubular sponge collected during Dive 06 of the current expedition. (HR)

Close-up of the tubular sponge showing the retracted polyps of a commensal cnidarian (yellow spots in branches).

July 18
Close-up of the tubular sponge showing the retracted polyps of a commensal cnidarian.

The turbocharger glass sponge collected during Dive 05 of the current expedition.

July 18
The turbocharger glass sponge collected during Dive 05 of the current expedition. (HR)

Annie White hard at work, clipping video.

July 17
Annie White hard at work, clipping video. (HR)

Headshot taken in Samoa in 2017.

July 17
Headshot of Annie White taken in Samoa in 2017.

Annie White working with wolves at the Mission Wolf sanctuary.

July 17
Annie White working with wolves at the Mission Wolf sanctuary. (HR)

Another day at the office for Dave, piloting the ‘tour-bus for science.’

July 15
Another day at the office for Dave, piloting the ‘tour-bus for science.’ (HR)

Electrical engineers Levi Unema and David Casagrande picking up on some of the finer points of fiber optic measurements from Dave Wright.

July 15
Electrical engineers learn about fiber optic measurements from Dave Wright. (HR)

A good question deserves a good answer. Dave Wright endeavors to explain noise suppression in the Deep Discoverer thruster control communications.

July 15
Dave Wright endeavors to explain noise suppression in the D2 thruster control communications. (HR)

CDR Eric Johnson oversees deployment of the CTD rosette during a shakedown cruise on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

July 12
CDR Eric Johnson oversees deployment of the CTD rosette on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Eric Johnson diving at Jarvis Island in equatorial Pacific when on the Hi‘ialakai.

July 12
Eric Johnson diving at Jarvis Island in the equatorial Pacific when on the Hi‘ialakai. (HR)

Eric Johnson with his wife and NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in the background during the Change of Command in July 2017.

July 12
Eric Johnson with his wife and the Okeanos Explorer in the background during the Change of Command in July. (HR)

Eric Johnson with his wife on the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during the transit back to Pearl Harbor.

July 12
Eric Johnson with his wife on the Okeanos Explorer during the transit back to Pearl Harbor. (HR)

Eric Johnson with his wife and NOAA Corps Officers during their recent wedding.

July 12
Eric Johnson with his wife and NOAA Corps Officers during their recent wedding. (HR)

Chocolate chip sea cucumber (<em>Holothuria</em> sp.) at Johnston Atoll.

July 10
Chocolate chip sea cucumber (Holothuria sp.) at Johnston Atoll. (HR)

<em>Acropora cytherea</em> is one of the major corals responsible for building the immense calcium carbonate substructure that supports the thin living skin of a reef.

July 10
Acropora cytherea is one of the corals responsible for building the calcium carbonate substructure that supports the reef.

Tightly packed branches and nariform (nose-shaped) corallites of <em>Acropora nasuta</em> resemble floral clusters.

July 10
Tightly packed branches and nariform corallites of Acropora nasuta resemble floral clusters.

Convict tangs amidst a garden of coral heaven.

July 10
Convict tangs amidst a garden of coral heaven.

Ship systems and equipment were off for several weeks during the dry dock period. Part of the shakedown period includes literally turning on the power and rebooting all of the onboard computer systems to ensure the software is working and up-to-date. One computer in particular took a long time to bring online as the system had to install a lot of updates—120,641 to be exact.

July 9
Part of the shakedown period includes turning on the power and rebooting all of the computer systems. (HR)

Learn more about what a multibeam patch test is and what it consists of by reviewing this poster developed by Okeanos Explorer mapping interns in 2010.

July 9
Learn more about what a multibeam patch test is via this poster developed by Okeanos mapping interns. (HR)

Telepresence Engineer, Roland Brian, and Senior Electrical Engineer, Dave Wright, verifying configuration of the telepresence network switch in the ship’s rack room. During shakedown operations, the ship-to-shore video streams need to be re-established.

July 9
Roland Brian and Dave Wright verify configuration of the rack room telepresence network switch. (HR)

Kongsberg DP Technician, Michael Neal, provides training on use of the ship’s Dynamic Positioning system to NOAA Corps Officers ENS Anna Hallingstad and LT Aaron Colohon.

July 9
Michael Neal provides training on the Dynamic Positioning system to Anna Hallingstad and Aaron Colohon. (HR)

Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration Engineers Chris Ritter and Don Liberatore carry the USBL transponder after successful calibration and recovery of the unit.

July 9
Chris Ritter and Don Liberatore carry the USBL transponder after successful calibration and recovery. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in dry dock at Barbers Point on the Island of O‘ahu in Hawaii.

July 7
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in dry dock at Barbers Point on the Island of O‘ahu in Hawaii. (HR)

During dry dock, the Okeanos Explorer was raised out of the water so that maintenance crews and engineers could work on the hull of the ship.

July 7
During dry dock, the Okeanos was raised out of the water so crews and engineers could work on the hull. (HR)

The transducer fairing houses the ship’s various acoustic systems, including the transducers for the multibeam sonar (mapping), echo sounder, fathometer, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler, scientific sounding system (water column profiler), and ultra short baseline acoustics (system to track position of the remotely operated vehicle).

July 7
The transducer fairing houses the ship’s various acoustic systems. (HR)

The Okeanos Explorer has two large rudders that steer the ship while underway.

July 7
The Okeanos Explorer has two large rudders that steer the ship while underway. (HR)

Also during the dry dock period, the bow thruster and stern thrusters underwent routine maintenance.

July 7
Also during the dry dock period, the bow thruster and stern thrusters underwent routine maintenance. (HR)

The Okeanos Explorer is diesel electric, using four very large diesel engines that put out 600 kilowatts of electricity each.

July 7
The Okeanos Explorer is diesel electric, using four diesel engines that put out 600 kilowatts of electricity each. (HR)

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Images (Background Essays)

Map showing the general cruise plan for the Johnston Atoll exploration portion of the expedition.

Mission Plan
Map showing the general cruise plan for the Johnston Atoll exploration portion of the expedition. (HR)

Established in January 2009 by Presidential Proclamation 8336 and expanded in 2014 by Presidential Proclamation 9173, the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument consists of Wake, Baker, Howland, and Jarvis Islands; Johnston Atoll; Kingman Reef; and Palmyra Atoll.

Mission Plan
Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument consists of Wake, Baker, Howland, and Jarvis Islands; Johnston Atoll; Kingman Reef; and Palmyra Atoll. (HR)

[caption]

Mission Plan
Several large deepwater corals grow in a high-density community. (HR)

Map showing expedition cruise plans with previous work in the region.

Mission Plan
Map showing expedition cruise plans with previous work in the region. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real time to a shore-based hub where the video is then transmitted to a number of Exploration Command Centers located around the country as well as to any Internet-enabled device.

Mission Plan
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real time to a shore-based hub. (HR)

Hyporthodus quernus, a commercially harvested grouper that is only found at Johnston and the Hawaiian Archipelago.

Biological Questions
Hyporthodus quernus, a commercially harvested grouper that is only found at Johnston and the Hawaiian Archipelago. (HR)

Biological Questions
Potential dispersal routes connecting Johnston Atoll to the Hawaiian Archipelago. (HR)

CTD oxygen data from remotely operated vehicle Dive 08 of Leg 4 of the 2015 Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawaiʻi expedition on Lone Cone seamount in JAU.

Biological Questions
CTD oxygen data from Dive 08 of Leg 4 of the 2015 Hohonu Moana expedition on "Lone Cone" seamount in JAU. (HR)

Latitudinal change in the depth at which oxygen levels are at 1.0 mg/l, here considered to be the insular equivalent of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ).

Biological Questions
Latitudinal change in the depth at which oxygen levels are at 1.0 mg/l, here considered to be the insular equivalent of the Oxygen Minimum Zone. (HR)

Two guyots just south of Johnston Atoll in the monument that have cone features on their summits.

Geology
Two guyots just south of Johnston Atoll in the monument that have cone features on their summits. (HR)

Main Line Islands seamount chain lineation (thick black line NW-SE) and two cross-trend seamount trails (thinner black lines that are E-W).

Geology
Main Line Islands seamount chain lineation (thick black line NW-SE) and two cross-trend seamount trails (thinner black lines that are E-W). (HR)

Conical seamount (left) and guyot (right) showing the difference in the summit morphology.

Seamounts
Conical seamount and guyot, showing the difference in the summit morphology. (HR)

Large bamboo coral colonies found on ridge topography.

Seamounts
Large bamboo coral colonies found on ridge topography. (HR)

A bathygadid fish that typically prefers calmer waters.

Seamounts
A bathygadid fish that typically prefers calmer waters. (HR)

A sediment-dwelling sea cucumber, Psychropotes sp.

Seamounts
A sediment-dwelling sea cucumber, Psychropotes sp. (HR)

A fish, Bathysaurus sp.

Seamounts
A fish, Bathysaurus sp. (HR)

Seastar at Johnston Atoll.

History of Johnston Atoll
Seastar at Johnston Atoll. (HR)

Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) building prior to demolition.

History of Johnston Atoll
Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) building prior to demolition.

Nuclear-armed Thor missile explodes and burns on the launch pad at Johnston Island during the failed Bluegill Prime nuclear test, July 25, 1962.

History of Johnston Atoll
Nuclear-armed Thor missile explodes and burns on the launch pad at Johnston Island during the failed "Bluegill Prime" nuclear test in 1962.

Johnston Island Launch Emplacement One (LE1) after a Thor missile launch failure and explosion contaminated the island with Plutonium during the Operation Bluegill Prime nuclear test, July, 1962.

History of Johnston Atoll
Johnston Island Launch Emplacement One after a Thor missile launch failure and explosion contaminated the island with Plutonium in 1962.

Known occurrences of marine ferromanganese deposits worldwide, obtained from the International Seabed Authority Central Data Repository.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Known occurrences of marine ferromanganese deposits worldwide. (HR)

Geologists surmise the thickest and most metal-rich ferromanganese crusts are found at depths between 800 and 2,500 meters on seamount flanks and summits.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Geologists surmise the thickest and most metal-rich ferromanganese crusts are found at depths between 800 and 2,500 meters on seamount flanks and summits. (HR)

Water depths between 800 and 2,500 meters are delineated in red. This is the depth range of crusts thought to have the best economic development potential.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Delineated in red are the depth ranges of crusts thought to have the best economic development potential. (HR)

Profile of seamount within Johnston Island EEZ that hosts thick and cobalt-rich crust deposits, all above water depths of 2,500 meters.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Profile of seamount within Johnston Island EEZ that hosts thick and cobalt-rich crust deposits, all above water depths of 2,500 meters. (HR)

Rankings of Prospective Crust Deposits, based on measured crust thickness.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Rankings of Prospective Crust Deposits, based on measured crust thickness. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

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