Deepwater Wonders of Wake




Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the Deepwater Wonders of Wake: Exploring the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Deepwater Wonders of Wake.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) | Images (Background Essays)

 


Highlight Videos

The ‘Campaign to Address Pacific monument Science, Technology, and Ocean NEeds (CAPSTONE)’ is a major multi-year effort focused on exploring these deepwater marine protected areas.

video Motivation to Explore
The CAPSTONE is a major multi-year effort focused on exploring deepwater marine protected areas in the Pacific. (Video)

During the last dive of the expedition, scientists saw this slime star, which uses mucus as a defense mechanism.

video August 16:
Slime Star
During the last dive, scientists saw this slime star, which uses mucus as a defense mechanism. (Video)

During its return to the surface following the last dive of 2016, the Deep Discoverer remotely operated vehicle had this brief encounter with this red squid.

video August 16:
Squid Encounter
During its return to the surface following the last dive of 2016, Deep Discoverer had a brief encounter with this red squid. (Video)

A quick look at some of the corals and sponges seen while exploring a seamount located ~189 miles south of Wake Island.

video August 15:
Deepwater Corals and Sponges
A quick look at some of the corals and sponges seen while exploring a seamount south of Wake Island. (Video)

This red jelly was seen dancing through the water column during exploration of a guyot located approximately 70 miles southwest of Wake Island at a depth of approximately 1,260 meters.

video August 14:
Coronate Medusa
This red jelly was seen dancing through the water column during exploration of a guyot located southwest of Wake Island. (Video)

Dive 11 was the second of two shallower dives during the expedition that targeted the precious coral resources around Wake Island.

video August 13:
Around the Next Corner
Dive 11 was the second of two shallower dives that targeted precious coral resources around Wake Island. (Video)

During the dive, the ROVs landed close to the intended target and quickly came upon the bow of a ship.

video August 11:
Amakasu Maru WWII Shipwreck
During the dive, the ROVs landed close to the intended target and quickly came upon the bow of a ship. (Video)

On August 10, 2016, we conducted a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive off of Wake Island, searching for the site of the shipwreck of the Japanese destroyer <em>Hayate</em>. Almost immediately, a shipwreck was found and we began surveying the site. We eventually determined that the wreck was not the Hayate, but the Amakusa Maru, a Japenese water tanker that was sunk by the USS Triton on December 24, 1942.

video August 11:
WWII Japanese Shipwreck
On August 10, 2016, we dove off of Wake Island, searching for the site of the shipwreck of the Japanese destroyer Hayate. (Video)

This deep-sea ray was seen cruising along the seafloor at a depth of 1,020 meters, during exploration around Wake Island.

video August 10:
Deep-sea Ray
This deep-sea ray was seen cruising along the seafloor at a depth of 1,020 meters, during exploration around Wake Island. (Video)

There was something fishy about Dive 8 -- it was indeed the fishiest dive of the expedition, with a variety of eels, swimmers, squatters, a big ray, and even a large shark. The dive took place north of Wake Island, on an unnamed seamount at a depth of ~1,025 meters.

video August 10:
Fish Faces
Dive 8 was the fishiest dive of the expedition, with a variety of eels, swimmers, squatters, a ray, and a shark. (Video)

A sea star eats its way up a whip coral in this closeup example of underwater predation.

video August 9:
Predation
A sea star eats its way up a whip coral in this closeup example of underwater predation. (Video)

On August 6, 2016, during a remotely operated vehicle dive off of Wake Island, we found our old friend the sea toad, who, after a short posing session, was on the move.

video August 6:
Sea Toad
On August 6, 2016, during a remotely operated vehicle dive off of Wake Island, we found our old friend the sea toad. (Video)

During the fifth dive of the expedition, on an unnamed seamount at a depth of ~2,600 meters, scientists believe that they found the bottom of the area's dense coral and sponge community depth range. While the animals seen on the dive were spread out, from a variety of corals to fish and crinoids, scientists encountered a lot of diversity during the dive.

video August 5:
Deepwater Denizens
During Dive 5, scientists believe that they found the bottom of the area's dense coral and sponge community depth range. (Video)

<em>Deep Discoverer</em> explores a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

video August 3:
Delilah Seamount
Deep Discoverer explores a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. (Video)

On August 2, 2016, we conducted the second remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the expedition and the first dive inside the Wake Atoll Unit of the Pacifc Remote Islands Marine National Monument. During the dive, scientists found this large forest of coral.

video August 2:
Coral Forest
During the second dive of the expedition, scientists found this large forest of coral. (Video)

On July 30, 2016, we conducted the first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the  expedition, exploring a Cretacous-age seamount. This

video July 30:
Giant Anemone
This "whopping big" anenome was found and recorded during the first dive of the expedition. (Video)

Genevieve Cabrera showed this video to her village elders of an unidentified jelly floating through the water column that was filmed during the Okeanos Explorer expedition to the Mariana region.

video July 30 Mission Log
Genevieve Cabrera showed this video to her village elders of an unidentified jelly floating through the water column. (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Images (Daily Updates)

The mission team of the Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition.

August 19
The mission team of the Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition. (HR)

Sunrise seen from the bridge wing of the Okeanos Explorer.

August 17-18
Sunrise seen from the bridge wing of the Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

 

 

 

 

An unusual blue shrimp was imaged for the second time this expedition.

August 16
An unusual blue shrimp was imaged for the second time this expedition. (HR)

The second squall line approaches the Okeanos Explorer just before the remotely operated vehicles reach the bottom.

August 15
The second squall line approaches the Okeanos Explorer just before the ROVs reach the bottom. (HR)

An urchin climbs up the dead skeleton of a bamboo coral.

August 14
An urchin climbs up the dead skeleton of a bamboo coral. (HR)

A large sixgill shark checks out D2.

August 13
A large sixgill shark checks out D2. (HR)

Several large deepwater corals grow in a high-density community.

August 12
Several large deepwater corals grow in a high-density community. (HR)

The stern of the <em>Amakasu Maru No. 1</em>, with her name still visible 73 years after she was sunk.

August 11
The stern of the Amakasu Maru No. 1, with her name still visible 73 years after she was sunk. (HR)

This is a great look at the spiral shape of an Iridogorgia.

August 10
This is a great look at the spiral shape of an Iridogorgia. (HR)

A sea star eats its way up a whip coral.

August 9
A sea star eats its way up a whip coral. (HR)

The ship hits a large swell during a weather day spent mapping.

August 8
The ship hits a large swell during a weather day spent mapping. (HR)

The expedition coordination team and the science lead study the latest forecast.

August 7
The expedition coordination team and the science lead study the latest forecast. (HR)

While recovering the ROV, an oceanic whitetip shark cruised by to check out D2.

August 6
While recovering the ROV, an oceanic whitetip shark cruised by to check out D2. (HR)

A sea toad hanging out, waiting for its next meal to swim by.

August 6
A sea toad hanging out, waiting for its next meal to swim by. (HR)

A squat lobster at home in its octocoral.

August 5
A squat lobster at home in its octocoral. (HR)

The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration ROV team finish up their post-dive check list.

August 4
The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration ROV team finish up their post-dive check list. (HR)

<em>Deep Discoverer</em> images a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

August 3
Deep Discoverer images a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. (HR)

Crinoid perched on a glass sponge.

August 2
Crinoid perched on a glass sponge. (HR)

Mapping lead Lindsay McKenna works on troubleshooting the multibeam.

July 31 - August 1
Mapping lead Lindsay McKenna works on troubleshooting the multibeam. (HR)

The control room on the <em>Okeanos Explorer </em>during our first dive of the expedition.

July 30
The control room on the Okeanos Explorer during our first dive of the expedition. (HR)

The water is so calm, it is hard to believe that the nearest land is more than 400 nautical miles away; it looks more like a painting than reality.

July 29
The water is so calm, it is hard to believe that the nearest land is more than 400 nautical miles away. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle engineer Sean Kennison washes down <em>Seirios</em> after our launch and recovery practice.

July 28
Remotely operated vehicle engineer Sean Kennison washes down Seirios after our launch and recovery practice. (HR)

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Images (Mission Logs)

Infographic summarizing accomplishments from the 2016 Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition.

Mission Summary
Infographic summarizing accomplishments from the 2016 Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition.

Overview map showing seafloor bathymetry collected and ROV dives conducted during the Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition.

Mission Summary
Overview map showing seafloor bathymetry collected and ROV dives conducted during the expedition. (HR)

Raw multibeam point data of suspected wreck of Japanese destroyer Hayate. Further investigation with ROV Deep Discoverer confirmed it is Japanese cargo ship, Amakasu Maru No.1.

August 14
Raw multibeam point data of suspected wreck later confirmed to be Japanese cargo ship, Amakasu Maru No.1. (HR)

 

 

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer comes upon the bow of the Amakasu Maru No.1.

August 14
Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer comes upon the bow of the Amakasu Maru No.1. (HR)

Considerable damage seen on the hull of the Amakasu Maru No.1 may be due to torpedoes fired by the American submarine, USS Triton.

August 14
Considerable damage seen on the hull of the Amakasu Maru No.1. (HR)

The ship sits upright and intact on the bottom and now serves as a habitat for anemones, glass sponges, anglerfish, and other animals.

August 14
The ship sits upright and intact on the bottom and now serves as a habitat for anemones, glass sponges, anglerfish, and other animals. (HR)

Lettering seen on the stern of the Amakasu Maru No.1

August 14
Lettering seen on the stern of the Amakasu Maru No.1. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer comes upon the bow of the Amakasu Maru No.1.

August 14
Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer comes upon the bow of the Amakasu Maru No.1. (HR)

A Caulophacus sponge anchored to the seafloor.

August 13
A Caulophacus sponge anchored to the seafloor. (HR)

Clearly visible pillow lavas seen during the exploration of an unnamed seamount despite the fact that the seamount is quite old and manganese-crusted.

August 13
Clearly visible pillow lavas seen during the exploration of a seamount despite the fact that the seamount is old and manganese-crusted. (HR)

The soft-sediment environment of an unnamed seamount off of Wake Island. This sandy habitat likely provides homes for many critters living directly within the sediments of the seafloor.

August 13
The soft-sediment environment of an unnamed seamount off of Wake Island. (HR)

Scientists use Deep Discoverer to collect a rock sample from a hard-substrate environment.

August 13
Scientists use Deep Discoverer to collect a rock sample from a hard-substrate environment. (HR)

Mapping Team Lead, Lindsay McKenna Gray, and Senior Survey Tech, Charlie Wilkins, working in the control room.

August 12
Mapping Team Lead, Lindsay McKenna Gray, and Senior Survey Tech, Charlie Wilkins, working in the control room. (HR)

Mapping Watch Lead, Dan Freitas, conducting an XBT cast.

August 12
Mapping Watch Lead, Dan Freitas, conducting an XBT cast. (HR)

A point cloud of multibeam sonar soundings.

August 12
A point cloud of multibeam sonar soundings. (HR)

Subottom seismic reflection profile at the base of seamount. Notice the lighter reflected sediment deposited over the darker underlying bedrock.

August 12
Subottom seismic reflection profile at the base of seamount. Notice the lighter reflected sediment deposited over the darker underlying bedrock. (HR)

Lines transited over McDonnell Seamount during the Mapping in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument expedition.

August 12
Lines transited over McDonnell Seamount during the Mapping in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument expedition. (HR)

Before the <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> collects mapping data in an area, all we know about the area is what we can see in the satellite-derived bathymetry.

August 12
Before the Okeanos Explorer collects mapping data in an area, all we know about the area is what we can see in the satellite-derived bathymetry. (HR)

The multibeam bathymetry collected during during the Mapping in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument expedition gridded to 75 meters. There was not enough time on that cruise to collect data over the entire seamount, which measures roughly 3,600 square kilometers.

August 12
The multibeam bathymetry collected during during the Mapping in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument expedition gridded to 75 meters. (HR)

On the current Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition, we had a few weather days where we couldn’t deploy the ROVs, this allowed us time to map over McDonnell Seamount, completing coverage over the seamount.

August 12
On the current expedition, we had a few weather days, which allowed us time to map over McDonnell Seamount, completing coverage over the seamount. (HR)

Deb and the rest of the expedition science team watch a remotely operated vehicle recovery during the Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas Expedition.

August 11
Deb and the rest of the expedition science team watch a remotely operated vehicle recovery during the Marianas Expedition. (HR)

Deb working with interns at the Harbor Branch Exploration Command Center.

August 11
Deb working with interns at the Harbor Branch Exploration Command Center. (HR)

Video engineer Roland Brian works to troubleshoot some of the ship’s video equipment.

August 10
Video engineer Roland Brian works to troubleshoot some of the ship’s video equipment. (HR)

More than two dozen ophiacanthid brittle stars cling to the branches of a primnoid octocoral colony on “Lafayette Guyot.”

August 9
More than two dozen ophiacanthid brittle stars cling to the branches of a primnoid octocoral colony on "Lafayette Guyot." (HR)

A chirostylid squat lobster in the branches of a Chrysogorgia octocoral on “Lafayette Guyot.” Chirostylidae translates from the Greek as “pointed hands,” in reference to the elongate chelipeds (clawed arms).

August 9
A chirostylid squat lobster in the branches of a Chrysogorgia octocoral on "Lafayette Guyot." (HR)

A sea spider (Pycnogonida) clambering over a bamboo coral (Keratoisidinae) on “Lafayette Guyot.” The presence of the sea spider has caused the octocoral polyps to contract their tentacles over their mouths.

August 9
A sea spider (Pycnogonida) clambering over a bamboo coral (Keratoisidinae) on "Lafayette Guyot." (HR)

ROV Engineer Chris Ritter manages the tether during recovery of Deep Discoverer.

August 7
ROV Engineer Chris Ritter manages the tether during recovery of Deep Discoverer. (HR)

Able-bodied Seaman Abe Mcdowell instructs Able-bodied Seaman Nicky Applewhite and General Vessel Assistant Frank Polonak during launch of ROV Seirios.

August 7
Abe Mcdowell instructs Nicky Applewhite and Frank Polonak during launch of ROV Seirios. (HR)

The 48-hour weather prediction from the National Weather Service/National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Ocean Prediction Center.

August 7
The 48-hour weather prediction from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Ocean Prediction Center. (HR)

The VSAT (large dome; stands for “Very Small Aperture Terminal”) is the critical piece of infrastructure that makes telepresence possible.

August 2
The VSAT is the critical piece of infrastructure that makes telepresence possible. (HR)

This diagram illustrates the flow of information from the seafloor and ultimately to viewers around the world.

August 2
This diagram illustrates the flow of information from the seafloor and ultimately to viewers around the world. (HR)

Traditional navigation on display: Traditional canoes sailing from Satawal to Saipan to attend the Festival of Pacific Arts in May and June 2016.

July 30
Traditional canoes sailing from Satawal to Saipan to attend the Festival of Pacific Arts in May and June 2016. (HR)

A view of Spanish Steps as the ship departs Guam.

July 28
A view of Spanish Steps as the ship departs Guam. (HR)

Operations Officer LTJG Aaron Colohan scans the horizon while on watch.

July 28
Operations Officer LTJG Aaron Colohan scans the horizon while on watch. (HR)

The crew looks on as ROV engineer Chris Ritter attaches the pin securing ROV Deep Discoverer to the lift crane.

July 28
The crew looks on as ROV engineer Chris Ritter attaches the pin securing Deep Discoverer to the lift crane. (HR)

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Images (Background Essays)

This image shows the intended operating area for this expedition. The shaded area is the boundary of PRIMNM and the multi-color lines are bathymetry collected by via NOAA Ship <em>Okeanos Explorer</em> earlier this year.

Mission Plan
This image shows the intended operating area for this expedition.

Side scan sonar image of an F6F Hellcat fighter plane (lower right) off Pearl Harbor, Oahu.

Identifying Historic Wreck Sites
Side scan sonar image of an F6F Hellcat fighter plane off Pearl Harbor, Oahu. (HR)

Multibeam sonar bathymetry image of the Japanese submarine, I-400.

Identifying Historic Wreck Sites
Multibeam sonar bathymetry image of the Japanese submarine, I-400. (HR)

Multibeam backscatter image of a Boeing B-29 Superfortress off Tinian Island.

Identifying Historic Wreck Sites
Multibeam backscatter image of a Boeing B-29 Superfortress off Tinian Island. (HR)

Raw multibeam point data of suspected wreck of Japanese destroyer Hayate.

Identifying Historic Wreck Sites
Raw multibeam point data of suspected wreck of Japanese destroyer Hayate. (HR)

Large bamboo coral colonies on a guyot ridge.

Guyots as Habitat
Large bamboo coral colonies on a guyot ridge. (HR)

Flat-top guyot shown in comparison to a conical seamount.

Guyots as Habitat
Flat-top guyot shown in comparison to a conical seamount. (HR)

A sediment-dwelling sea cucumber.

Guyots as Habitat
A sediment-dwelling sea cucumber. (HR)

A sediment-dwelling shrimp.

Guyots as Habitat
A sediment-dwelling shrimp. (HR)

Partially mapped guyot showing cones on the summit that resulted from rejuvenated volcanism.

Guyots as Habitat
Partially mapped guyot showing cones on the summit that resulted from rejuvenated volcanism. (HR)

Map showing the location of Wake Island and the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

Monument Management
Map showing the location of Wake Island and the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

World War II shoreline pillbox at Wake Island.

Monument Management
World War II shoreline pillbox at Wake Island.

One of the Wake Island shipwrecks just outside the channel to the marina.

Monument Management
One of the Wake Island shipwrecks just outside the channel to the marina.

Bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) at Wake Atoll, the largest known population of this species in the world.

Monument Management
Bumphead parrotfish at Wake Atoll, the largest known population of this species in the world.

Map showing satellite-derived bathymetry of the Pacific Ocean based on gravity (color showing depth; purple to red is deep to shallow).

Geologic Overview
Map showing satellite-derived bathymetry of the Pacific Ocean based on gravity. (HR)

A pillow mound composed of glassy pillow lavas.

Geologic Overview
A pillow mound composed of glassy pillow lavas. (HR)

Ferromanganese crusts draping rocks (and even old sponge stalks) at Fryer Guyot in the Mariana region.

Geologic Overview
Ferromanganese crusts draping rocks at Fryer Guyot in the Mariana region. (HR)

Pacific Prime Crust Zone (PCZ) boundary (green) shown in comparison to the U.S. Pacific monuments (pink) and U.S. EEZ boundaries (black). The PCZ extends from the Hawaiian Islands in the east to the border of the Mariana Trench in the west.

Deep-sea Mining
Pacific Prime Crust Zone boundary shown in comparison to the U.S. Pacific monuments and U.S. EEZ boundaries. (HR)

Cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust with batraoidal (bubbly) appearance characteristic of older, thicker deposits.

Deep-sea Mining
Cobalt-rich ferromanganese crust with batraoidal (bubbly) appearance characteristic of older, thicker deposits. (HR)

Map showing the ISA’s current area of most interest for Fe-Mn crust mining in the western part of the PCZ in the Pacific.

Deep-sea Mining
Map showing the ISA’s current area of most interest for Fe-Mn crust mining in the western part of the PCZ in the Pacific. (HR)

Map of the Western Pacific showing the locations of Mn crust exploratory sites granted by the ISA.

Deep-sea Mining
Map of the Western Pacific showing the locations of Mn crust exploratory sites granted by the ISA. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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