Deepwater Wonders of Wake






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The mission team of the Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition.

The mission team of the Deepwater Wonders of Wake expedition. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 19, 2016

Expedition Complete

This morning we arrived in Kwajalein Atoll, which is one of the world's largest atolls with the lagoon inside the atoll covering over 800 square miles. Thanks to the hospitality of the U.S. Army Garrison Kwajalein Atoll, we will be able to get some much needed rest on the island and resupply the ship. It was a get expedition and while we are all sad it is over, we are looking forward to setting foot on solid ground again after 24 days at sea.


 


 

 

 

Sunrise seen from the bridge wing of the Okeanos Explorer.

Sunrise seen from the bridge wing of the Okeanos Explorer. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 17 - 18, 2016

Transit Mapping

We spent the last two days transit mapping our way to Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. While we were primarily transiting, we had enough time in the schedule to tailor our route to map a seamount chain that had never been mapped before. The ROV and Data engineers used the transit days to get ahead on the demobilization checklist and end-of-cruise wrap-up, while the mapping team had the extra work of staffing mapping watches 24 hours a day instead of just an overnight watch like they had been doing for most of the cruise.


 


 

 

 

An unusual blue shrimp was imaged for the second time this expedition.

An unusual blue shrimp was imaged for the second time this expedition. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of a slime star imaged during the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 16, 2016

Dive 14

We conducted our 14th and final dive of the expedition on an unnamed guyot with a curious mound-shaped feature that may or may not be volcanic in origin. If it turns out to be volcanic, then it could have formed as a result of rejuvenated volcanism. The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) began the benthic part of the dive on the flat guyot summit next to the feature. The ROV then move to the feature and up its flank until it reached the top. This dive was one of the shallowest dives on a guyot in the monument since most of the planned track was above the main flat summit. We hoped this dive would also provide data and samples for use in determining the geologic history of this seamount. Unfortunately, this dive was again affected by weather conditions. The weather turned progressively worse throughout the day, and the decision was made to bring the vehicles up to the surface after 3.5 hours on the seafloor. When we first made contact with the bottom, we found a field of cobbles and boulders with sediment between the rocks instead of the expected sandy seafloor. It appeared that at least this part of the summit was covered with manganese (Mn)-encrusted rocks that looked like pillow lavas forming a series of pillow mounds. A Mn-encrusted basalt sample was obtained from the edge of one of these mounds. As we arrived at the edge of the cone, the surface became even more consolidated, showing larger Mn-encrusted surfaces, and again appearing to be formed from pillow (and tube) lavas. A fairly uneven terrain was present on the slopes, with multi-meter high offsets. As the dive progressed, the vehicles ended up on the edge of a slightly more level area (before the remainder of the dome's edge), which showed more sediment between the Mn-encrusted rocks. The dive was cut short well before the final way point was reached, having covered just under half of the planned dive track, leaving the bottom around 1,200 meters. The top of the guyot and the dome feature were home to many more animals than expected, the most abundant of which were primnoid corals. We also observed bamboo and plexarid corals, an unusual blue shrimp, and several sea pens. Aside from the primnoids, fishes were the most numerous animals near and on the dome. Once the ROVs were safely back on deck, we commenced transiting towards Kwajalein.


 


 

 

 

The second squall line approaches the Okeanos Explorer just before the remotely operated vehicles reach the bottom.

The second squall line approaches the Okeanos Explorer just before the remotely operated vehicles reach the bottom. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of corals and sponges seen during the short time on the seafloor.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 15, 2016

Dive 13

Dive 13 was conducted on a seamount located ~189 miles south of Wake Island, and near the southern boundary of the monument. We nicknamed the seamount "Batfish" for its appearance on the map. The dive was situated on the southeasterly ridge, at a depth of approximately 3,100 meters. We were hampered by weather conditions throughout the dive. First, we had to delay launch to allow a squall to pass. Then, just before the remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) were about the reach the seafloor, another much stronger squall passed the ship. The winds changed directions and nearly doubled in a matter of a minute or two, so we had to keep the ROVs in the water column to allow the ship to maneuver in the storm. After that squall passed, we had about 1.5 hours on the seafloor before we had to abort the dive due to increasingly poor weather conditions.

Given the short amount of bottom time, the dive focused on doing some collections rather quickly and spending a limited amount of time between collections for exploring. As expected from the depth range, the fauna at greater than 3,000 meters was sparse; however, we did document several species of coral and fish.


 


 

 

 

An urchin climbs up the dead skeleton of a bamboo coral.

An urchin climbs up the dead skeleton of a bamboo coral. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch of a jelly seen during the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 14, 2016

Dive 12

Today's dive was on a guyot located approximately 70 miles southwest of Wake Island and was unofficially dubbed "Revolver Seamount." The objective of the dive was to survey a volcanic cone located on the flat summit of the seamount. The current thinking is that these could have formed as a result of rejuvenated volcanism (after the seamount formed a coral reef on top). The vehicles reached the bottom at a depth of 1,266 meters. The dive track ran along the crest of the cone that is situated on the southeastern edge of the guyot top, and the cone appears to have partly slumped down the edge of the guyot. Given the cone's location on top of the presumed carbonate and/or pelagic sediment platform, erosion and sedimentary processes occurred prior to the cone's eruption. Therefore, it is presumed to represent post-erosional (or rejuvenated) volcanism. At the landing site, the seafloor appeared to consist of manganese-coated cobbles and boulders, possibly representing pillow lavas, with a few small pockets of little sand. Right at the landing site, a loose angular rock (instead of the rounder, larger pillow shapes) was collected, which in the lab appears to contain fragments of carbonate and potentially volcanoclastic material.

Although today's dive was in a depth that we considered optimal for animals, the density was low but the diversity was relatively high. Sponges included species in the genera Walteria, Dictyaulus, Poliopogon, Farrea, Bolosoma, Tretopleura, Atlantisella, and Saccocalyx. Coral genera included Paragorgia, Hemicorallium, Narella, Calyptrophora, Victorgorgia, Paramuricea, Iridogorgia, Acanthogorgia, and Trissopathes. Arthropods and echinoderms included shrimp, a polychelid lobster, a crab carrying a single anemone, various seastars, crinoids (all of which were feather stars). Fish were present as well, mainly eels that included an unusual synaphobranchid or possibly the juvenile phase of something well known, a sorceress eel, rat tails, cusk eels, and tripod fish.


 


 

 

 

A large sixgill shark checks out D2.

A large sixgill shark checks out D2. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video from the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 13, 2016

Dive 11

This was the second of two shallower dives targeting the precious coral resources around Wake Island. The first was on the northwest end of the island while today's dive was southeast of the island. The remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) reached the bottom around 21:11UTC at a depth of 640 meters. The dive ran along the top edge of what appeared to be a large slump or broken terrace wall on the slope of the island. This feature turned out to be a significant carbonate rock formation that had clearly undergone weathering and dissolution, at or above sea level. Subsequently, the present-day atoll near the surface generated and draped the ancient carbonate reef in a layer of coral sand. The location of this feature was just over a half mile from the eastern shore of Wake Atoll and one of the shallowest areas at that distance from the atoll. Consequently, this location helped to characterize precious corals and mid-water fish in the monument.

The terrain during this dive was dominated by carbonate deposits, sourced from the coral reef built on top of this atoll. The fauna on the carbonate varied depending on the nature of the substrate. Animals observed on sediment included fishes, sea pens, and an echiuran spoon worm. Animals found on the scattered boulders on the sediment included anemones, black corals, bamboo corals, crustaceans (shrimp and crabs), and echinoderms. When the ROV reached the dropoff, a large number of corals and other animals appeared, most notable of which were numerous precious gold coral colonies and thousands of rock pens. There were also numerous species of fish, including a large sixgill shark.


 


 

 

 

Several large deepwater corals grow in a high-density community.

Several large deepwater corals grow in a high-density community. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 12, 2016

Dive 10

We conducted Dive 10 on guyot rift zone ridge about 50 nautical miles south of Wake Atoll. The dive start and end points were a bit shallower than most of our previous guyot dives, being 1,500 meters and 1,400 meters, respectively, to specifically investigate this depth range on an otherwise similar feature to one we had already visited. Similar to previous dives in deeper waters, this dive featured mainly volcanic rocks, thickly coated in manganese (Mn), on the seafloor. The dive track led up the side of the ridge obliquely and along this track, the seafloor consisted mainly of massive deposits of Mn crust, likely well over an inch thick, blanketing what looked like pillow lavas. On rare locations, some of the underlying material was exposed under the Mn crust, through small broken down sections. The truly exciting thing about this dive was the discovery of an old, high-density, moderate-diversity community dominated by large Hemicorallium and primnoid colonies with smaller-sized colonies of Acanthogorgia. Amongst these corals were occasional colonies of bamboo and black corals. Finally, only a few species of fishes were observed that included halosaurs and rat tails.


 


 

 

 

The stern of the Amakasu Maru No 1 with her name still visible 73 years after she was sunk.

The stern of the Amakasu Maru No. 1 with her name still visible 73 years after she was sunk. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video from the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 11, 2016

Dive 9: Search for the Hayate

Today we set off in search of the Japanese Imperial Naval Destroyer, Hayate, which was sunk during the Battle of Wake. A previous mapping cruise on board the Okeanos Explorer had identified a very promising target that looked like a shipwreck and was about the right size to be the Hayate. We landed the vehicles about 100 meters away from the sonar target so we could make a very cautious approach to the wreck. Immediately, we started to see ship debris in the sediment and we had a very strong sonar target in the Seirios scanning sonar. The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) came up on the bow of the ship, right were we expected the wreck to be. There was a lot of excitement on the ship. Then we set about trying to confirm the ship identity. Very quickly, we all started to have doubts that this was in fact the Hayate. As we all compared the diagrams of the Hayate to what we were seeing, we became more and more convinced that we had found a yet-to-be-identified ship. Once we made our way to the stern of the vessel, we were surprised to see lettering still visible on the hull. One of our participating biologists, Asako Matsumoto, was able to translate the name of the ship for us and a Google search reveled the ship to be the Amakasu Maru No. 1, which was a Japanese water tanker that was sunk by a U.S. submarine in 1942. We spent another hour documenting the wreck, then we moved on to two more sonar targets that we thought could be the Hayate. However, both targets turned out to be rocks, so the final resting place of the Hayate will continue to be a mystery for a bit longer. Once we recovered the ROVs, we started mapping for the night.


 


 

 

 

This is a great look at the spiral shape of an Iridogorgia.

This is a great look at the spiral shape of an Iridogorgia. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of the many fishes encountered during the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 10, 2016

Dive 8

Today's dive was the first of a couple of shallower dives targeting the precious coral resources and fishes around Wake Island. The vehicles arrived at the seafloor at 22:26UTC, at a depth of 1,020 meters. The dive location was selected to optimize shallow water observation of fish and corals, and the northern side of the atoll accommodated this with some of the shallowest depths while maintaining a safe distance from the fringing reef. Wake Island (atoll) is the only geologic structure within the Wake Atoll Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument that reaches sea level (thus enabling this type of dive), and as expected, the bottom at this short distance from the atoll consisted of mainly reef debris. Overall, the bottom was characterized with three types of materials: loose sand, cobbles and boulders, and large rocky formations consisting of layers of reef debris. The initial landing site was located on a scree (talus) slope of mainly sand (shell and coral fragments). During this dive, the most commonly observed animals were a variety of fish and shrimp. The sandy terrain also hosted a number of sea cucumbers, while anemones were found on a number of the cobbles and boulders. Other observations included a feather star and ctenophore. On the more massive layered carbonate, we observed a small number of sponges and several types of corals were sampled just prior to leaving the seafloor.


 


 

 

 

A sea star eats its way up a whip coral.

A sea star eats its way up a whip coral. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video from the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 9, 2016

Dive 7

We conducted Dive 7 the side of a rift zone crest of another unnamed seamount 130 miles south of Wake Island. The depth range for the dive was between 2,100 and 1,900 meters. The first view of the ocean floor showed a relatively steep wall of pillow lavas coated in thick manganese (Mn) crust. The pillows were still visible as 10-50 centimeter sized "bumps"under the thick, smooth Mn crust. As we ascended to the ridge crest, it became fairly clear that the entire wall section was a large structure built from mainly pillow lavas (and some tube lavas). Only infrequent loose rocks were observed (likely displaced). Near the ridge crest and on top of it, the sediment load increased somewhat, particularly in the less steep sections along the crest. On the wall, the initial density of animals was moderate, with us mainly finding them on small knobs and boulders that were providing some distance from the main seafloor. As we entered the ridge crest, the density of animals increased, particularly on the harder surfaces, though still on the higher boulders and knobs. In addition to several types of sponges seen in the previous dives, an unknown small, wide-stick-type sponge was observed several times; however, its identity could not be deduced even to class. On the ridge crest, bottle-brush Chrysogorgia sp. were the most dominant animal.


 


 

 

 

The ship hits the large swell during a weather day spent mapping.

The ship hits a large swell during a weather day spent mapping. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 8, 2016

Weathered Out Again

Unfortunately, the weather was too bad again to get the remotely operated vechiles in the water. So we spent the day mapping, but the weather was rough enough that even the mapping data was not great. Overnight, we moved a bit further north and we will try and dive again tomorrow.


 


 

 

 

The expedition coordination team and the science lead study the latest forecast.

The expedition coordination team and the science lead study the latest forecast. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 7, 2016

Dive Canceled Due to Weather

Unfortunately, we woke up to bad weather this morning. We delayed the dive to see if it was going to improve, but alas, it got worse throughout the morning. After studying several different weather forecasts, it looked like we would have a better chance of diving on Monday if we headed south. So, we ended up transiting nearly 180 nautical miles south in the hopes of finding better weather tomorrow morning.


 


 

 

 

While recovering the ROV, an oceanic whitetip shark cruised by to check out D2.

While recovering the ROV, an oceanic whitetip shark cruised by to check out D2. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


A sea toad hanging out, waiting for its next meal to swim by.

A sea toad hanging out, waiting for its next meal to swim by. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of the sea toad.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 6, 2016

Dive 6

The weather was less than ideal during the pre-dive, so we delayed a couple hours to see if things improved, and lucky for us, they did. The remotely operated vehicle was deployed about 1030 ship time and reached the seafloor at a depth of approximately 2,240 meters. This particularly seamount is unnamed and located approximately 50 miles west of Wake Island. Its morphology again defines a flat-topped guyot type, with a summit near 1,200 meters. The seafloor was quite similar to yesterday's dive, although the amount of sand was overall less. The ridge that the vehicles ascended was actually made up of three significant pillow mounds, with more level areas in between. With respect to the biology, this site could be characterized as having a moderate density and moderate diversity coral and sponge community. Most animals were again concentrated on the harder, rockier bottom. Sponges were observed right from the start, several of which were not recognized by any of the participants; one of these was sampled later in the dive (likely a new species of Regadrella). The animals seemed well exposed to the southwestern current on the ridge that sometimes only spanned a few feet across near its crest. In the lower areas with slightly more sediments, the sponges were more dominant, but otherwise there was a good balance of sponges and corals.


 


 

 

 

A squat lobster at home in its octocoral

A squat lobster at home in its octocoral. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video from the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 5, 2016

Dive 5

We had a good dive today, because we think we found the bottom of the dense coral and sponge community depth range. The animals were a bit spread out, but there was actually lots of diversity. Highlights included a pretty rare black coral, a "fatty fingers" seastar (Pedicillasteridae), a fair number of Pleurogorgia militaris, some sea cucumbers, sponges, shrimp, crinoids, and a bunch of other things. The substrate took the spotlight, though, with clearly visible pillow lavas even though the seamount is quite old and manganese-crusted. We grabbed a wonderful piece of an actual pillow that will be quite valuable to the geologists. After we got the remotely operated vehicles back on deck, we fired up the mapping sonars and set off for our next dive site.


 


 

 

 

The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration ROV team finish up their post-dive check list.

The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration ROV team finish up their post-dive check list. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 4, 2016

Power Loss – Dive 4 Canceled

We deployed the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) for our fourth dive, but before we made it to the seafloor, the ship lost power. For a few tense moments, the ship was drifting while the ROV was in the water. With hard work and quick action by the ship's engineer, the power was back on and the ship was able to maneuver again in less than 10 minutes. Once power was restored, we recovered the ROV to troubleshoot the problem and make sure it would not happen again. While the engineers and ship's officers were troubleshooting, the mapping team completed mapping coverage of McDonnell Guyot


 


 

 

 

Deep Discoverer images a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

Deep Discoverer images a high-density coral community in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video from the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 3, 2016

Dive 3: Sampson Seamount

We conducted the third dive of the expedition today on an unnamed guyot. The dive was conducted on the southwest rift zone, which was similar in orientation and topography to the area we explored on Dive 2. Deep Discoverer reached the bottom at a depth of about 1,990 meters. The seafloor during this dive was characterized with some steeper and more level sections that hosted mainly massively covered rock and more sand-covered manganese-encrusted rock, respectively. The steeper sections appeared to consist of small knobs and hills seemingly built by pillows. We found an assortment of animals throughout the dive, including corals and sponges, as well as a polychelid lobster, crinoids, and a cusk eel. As we moved up slope, the number of animals increased significantly and it became clear that the highest densities occurred on the edges of the ridge, particularly the northwestern edge. The favored substrate appeared to be the massively coated hills and boulders, likely because these locations optimize exposure to currents bringing food. Several of the boulders were very dense with life. Overall, it was a very successful dive. After we recovered the remotely operated vehicle, we started transit mapping to our next dive site.


 


 

 

 

Crinoid perched on a glass sponge.

Crinoid perched on a glass sponge. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of a "coral forest" seen during the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
August 2, 2016

Dive 2: Sampson Seamount

We conducted our second remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive today. It was our first dive inside the Wake Island Unit of the Pacifc Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Just after the ROV was launched, the pilots noticed a problem with the ROV hydraulic system, so we had to recover the vehicle to make a quick repair. We redeployed the ROV a couple of hours later. The ROV reached the bottom at a depth near 2,240 meters. This location represents the southwest side of Sampson Seamount (unofficial name by Smoot, 1991). Given its depth and morphology, we expect that this seamount is a Cretaceous guyot. The dive location focuses on one of the volcanic rift zones that emanate from the central guyot platform. Along the entire ridge, we observed layered rock coated in manganese (Mn) crust.

As the ROV ascended, the terrain remained steep with massive Mn coating and very rare loose pieces of rock (one was sampled near the beginning of the dive; a volcaniclastic sedimentary rock with Mn crust). The steeper section during the first half of the dive was dominated by small primnoid octocorals, likely in the genus Narella. Interspersed between these corals were a large number of black corals. Glass sponges were also common. In the latter half of the dive where the terrain leveled out, we encountered a modest but dense stand of large bamboo corals concentrated along a rise and prominent boulder on top. Of particular interest was the observation of a rare seastar (Pythonaster sp.) on a sponge. We recovered the ROV later than usual to make up some of the time we lost with the hydraulic problem. Once the ROV was on deck, we started mapping our way to the next dive site.


 


 

 

 

Mapping lead Lindsay McKenna works on troubleshooting the multibeam.

Mapping lead Lindsay McKenna works on troubleshooting the multibeam. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
July 31 - August 1, 2016

Transiting and Repairs

We spent the last two days transiting towards the Wake Island Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. While we were transiting, we had a couple of issues we needed to work through. This first was our multibeam sonar, which has been acting up over the last couple days. We also unexpectedly lost power to some of our equipment on the ship. So even though we were just transiting, it was a very busy couple of days on the ship. But thanks to our very hard working engineers and technicians on board the ship, along with some help from shore, we have gotten things back to full operation. We have had an unusual number of problems over the last couple of days, so some people on the ship believe we picked up a gremlin somewhere, so we have been joking about the best was to capture the ship's new gremlin before it moves into a new system.


 


 

 

 

The control room on the Okeanos Explorer during our first dive of the expedition.

The control room on the Okeanos Explorer during our first dive of the expedition. Click image for credit and larger view.

video Watch video of a giant anemone encountered during the dive.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
July 30, 2016

Dive 1: Alba Seamount

Today we conducted our first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dive of the cruise at a depth near 2,300 meters. The dive site is the southwest side of Alba Seamount (also reported as Vlinder Seamount). This seamount is a Cretaceous guyot, given its flat top and the radiometric age obtained from a 1980s dredge sample. The dive location focused on one of the volcanic rift zones that emanate from the central guyot platform. At first sight, the bottom consisted of scattered rocks, with light-colored sand. The rocks were thickly coated in manganese (Mn) crust, while the sand appeared mostly white-ish. The sand is likely sourced from the flat platform above, and probably consists of reef debris, mixed with some pelagic sediment. The first rock sample was collected from this area, at the beginning of the dive. As the ROV ascended, the terrain alternated between more broken up Mn-covered rocks with sand and steeper, more massive rocky outcrops that mostly represent Mn-coated pillow and tube structures.

The more massive, rocky areas also served as the more common substrate for the animals that were seen during the dive. The density of the community was sparse to modest, but the diversity was high. The first animals recorded were stalked and unstalked glass sponges, primnoid octocorals, and several shrimp. Other noteworthy biological observations were a tumbling snail and a massive unidentified anemone.

After the ROV was recovered, we started transit mapping to our next dive site, which is nearly 300 nautical miles away. Since it will take us nearly 30 hours to get to the next site, there will be no dive tomorrow.


 


 

 

 

 The water is so calm it is hard to believe the nearest land is more than 400 nm away. It looks more like a painting than reality.

The water is so calm, it is hard to believe that the nearest land is more than 400 nautical miles away; it looks more like a painting than reality. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
July 29, 2016

Transit to the First Dive Site

It is a long transit to our first dive site, so we spent the last two days transit mapping. While we were transiting, we were treated to some of the calmest waters we have ever seen. It looked like we were steaming across an inland lake, not the middle of the Pacific Ocean. The Global Foundation for Ocean Exploration remotely operated vehicle (ROV) team used the transit days to make improvements on the ROVs and practice with the Deep Discoverer's manipulator arms. During the transit, we were also troubleshooting an issue with the VSAT. The problem alluded us for almost two days, but after some long days, our telepresence engineers and electronics technicians were able to get the satellite back to working normally.


 


 

 

 

 ROV engineer Sean Kennison washes down Seirios after our launch and recovery practice.

Remotely operated vehicle engineer Sean Kennison washes down Seirios after our launch and recovery practice. Click image for credit and larger view.

 


NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer
July 28, 2016

Underway

After several busy days preparing to get underway, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulled away from the dock. Shortly after we cleared the harbor, we stopped and went in to Dynamic Positioning to practice a couple of remotely operated vehicle (ROV) launches and recoveries. We experienced some problems with the remote control on the crane we use to lift the ROV during the inport. We had already fixed the problems, but we wanted to test the procedures for recovery of the ROV without the remote just in case. Satisfied that we could comfortably recover and launch with our the remote belt pack, we started transiting to our first dive site.


 


 

 

 

 

 

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