This pale white cusk eel (Leucicorus atlanticus) was photographed at about 3.1 miles (5,000 meters) depth at Sirena Canyon, on the edge of the Mariana Trench. The head and body have internal pigment and the eyes are black, but pigment is otherwise absent. Dark pigment around the gill cavities and abdomens of deep-sea fish may mask light that is produced by recently eaten prey. The dark pigment in the eyes is necessary for vision. This species of fish lacks a lens in the eye, and thus cannot see images, but the large eyes are capable of detecting flashes of light produced by other animals.

This pale white cusk eel (Leucicorus atlanticus) was photographed at about 3.1 miles (5,000 meters) depth at Sirena Canyon, on the edge of the Mariana Trench. The head and body have internal pigment and the eyes are black, but pigment is otherwise absent. Dark pigment around the gill cavities and abdomens of deep-sea fish may mask light that is produced by recently eaten prey. The dark pigment in the eyes is necessary for vision. This species of fish lacks a lens in the eye, and thus cannot see images, but the large eyes are capable of detecting flashes of light produced by other animals. Image courtesy of NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas.

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