The oblique-banded snapper or gindai (Pristipomoides zonatus) lives in the twilight, or mesophotic, zone where only dim blue light penetrates. The upper picture was taken with the lights of a submersible illuminating the fish at 935 feet (285 meters) during an Okeanos Explorer dive at Farallon de Medilla, Mariana Islands; bright gold bars are seen on the body. The lower photograph was taken at St. Rogatien Bank of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument at 625 feet (190 meters) with the lights of the submersible turned off; the color pattern is still easily seen, but the gold bars appear black at ambient light levels.

The oblique-banded snapper or gindai (Pristipomoides zonatus) lives in the twilight, or mesophotic, zone where only dim blue light penetrates. The upper picture was taken with the lights of a submersible illuminating the fish at 935 feet (285 meters) during an Okeanos Explorer dive at Farallon de Medilla, Mariana Islands; bright gold bars are seen on the body. The lower photograph was taken at St. Rogatien Bank of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument at 625 feet (190 meters) with the lights of the submersible turned off; the color pattern is still easily seen, but the gold bars appear black at ambient light levels. Top image courtesy of NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas. Bottom image courtesy of Bruce C. Mundy, NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.

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Related Links

May 9: Ghostly Fishes of the Abyss

2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer