Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawaiʻi






Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos associated with the 2015 Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawai’i expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

Unless otherwise noted, all images and videos are courtesy of the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, 2015 Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawai’i.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Dive Highlight Videos | Video Clips | Images (Daily Updates) | Images (Mission Logs) |
Images (Background Essays)

 


Dive Highlight Videos

Leg 3 Highlights

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 7

video September 3: Video Log
This dive visits the hull of the World War I submarine S-19 which now rests on the bottom at 414 m in the middle of a sand expanse. (Video)

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 6

video September 2: Video Log
This was the first dive ever conducted on Ellis Seamount located in the Geologist Seamounts group. (Video)

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 5

video September 1: Video Log
This was the first dive ever conducted on Swordfish Seamount located in the Geologist Seamounts group. (Video)

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 4

video August 31: Video Log
Video highlights on McCall Seamount, the first dive of the cruise in the Geologist Seamounts. (Video)

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 3

video August 30: Video Log
Video highlights along a 450-meter contour at the southern end of the Kona Coast of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi (Video)

Highlights video from Leg 3 Dive 2

video August 29: Video Log
Video highlights from a dive conducted off the Big Island of Hawaii at the Keahole precious coral bed. (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leg 2 Highlights

Highlights video from Dive 18

video August 20: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 18 at a channel between Westpac Bank and Nihoa Island. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 16

video August 17: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 16 on an old reef terrace edge north of Gardner Pinnacles. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 15

video August 16: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 15 on a ridge north of Maro Reef to survey a completely unexplored area. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 14

video August 15: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 14 on a ridge that extends northward from Pioneer Bank. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 13

video August 14: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 13 on a ridge southeast of an unnamed seamount east of Pearl and Hermes Atoll. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 12

video August 13: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 12 along the edge of a rift zone ridge extending southeast from Pearl & Hermes Atoll. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 11

video August 12: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 11 on a ridge that extends north from the northern half of Bank 9. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 7

video August 11: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 10 on a ridge that extends to the southeast of Salmon Bank. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 9

video August 10: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 9 on a sharp ridge that extended west from East Salmon Bank. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 8

video August 9: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 8 on seamount on the south side of Bank 9. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 7

video August 8: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 7 on a sharp ridge extending to the south of Pioneer Bank. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 6

video August 7: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 6 on a ridge extending south from West Northampton Seamount. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 5

video August 6: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 5 on a ridge southeast of Maro Reef. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 4

video August 5: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 4 on the eastern ridge of a crater east of Maro Reef. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 3

video August 4: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 3 along St. Rogatien Rift. (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 2

video August 3: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 2 near French Frigate Shoals (Kanehunamoku Seamount). (Video)

Highlights video from Dive 1

video August 2: Video Log
Highlights from Dive 1 on East Necker Seamount (Keoea Seamount). (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Video Clips

Unusual jellyfish spotted at ~1,000 meters depth during midwater transects on September 27, 2015.

video September 27:
Unusual jellyfish spotted at ~1,000 meters depth during midwater transects on September 27, 2015. (Video)

A sea cucumber, or holothurian, seen swimming just above the seafloor at a depth of ~4,085 meters on September 26, 2015.

video September 26:
A sea cucumber, or holothurian, seen swimming just above the seafloor at a depth of ~4,085 meters. (Video)

The cusk eel, Leucicorus lusciosus (Garman, 1899). This fish is rarely encountered - the whole genus is known from a collection of fewer than 20 individuals. This species was previously known only from the eastern tropical Pacific.

video September 26:
The cusk eel, Leucicorus lusciosus. This fish's genus is known from a collection of fewer than 20 individuals. (Video)

During recovery of the remotely operated vehicles at the end of the September-24 dive, this squid became rather attached to the Deep Discoverer.

video September 24:
During ROV recovery, this squid became rather "attached" to the Deep Discoverer. (Video)

video September 21:
A sea star feasts on a coral by inverting its stomach. (Video)

This red ctenophore with long tentacles was documented not far off the bottom at Southernmost Cone on September 20, 2015.

video September 20:
A ctenophore with long tentacles belonging to the Family Aulacoctenidae. (Video)

video September 19:
Scientists encountered this large anemone with several scale worms crawling across its surface. (Video)

This siphonophore was seen swimming through the water column during a dive to investigate two cone features along an extension of Hutchinson Seamount, part of the Johnston Seamounts.

video September 19:
This siphonophore was seen swimming through the water column during a dive near Hutchinson Seamount. (Video)

video September 19:
This whiplash squid attached itself to the ROV before coming around to the front of the vehicle. (Video)

video September 18:
This jellyfish appears to be an undescribed species of Bathykorus. (Video)

video September 18:
An unusual polychaete documented during the September 18 dive at Deep Twin Ridge. (Video)

video September 17:
A rarely seen chimaera, spotted during Dive 04 of Leg 4. (Video)

video September 17:
During the dive, the ROV disturbed several crinoids who took to the water. (Video)

video September 17:
Halosaur seen while exploring on the southeast side of Johnston Atoll. (Video)

video September 13:
This basket star was seen while exploring a pinnacle feature on the southwest coast of Niihau. (Video)

This cusk eel (family Ophidiidae) seen swimming in the water column during the first dive ever conducted on Swordfish Seamount, located in the Geologist Seamounts group.

video September 2:
Cusk eel seen swimming in the water column during the first dive ever conducted on Swordfish Seamount. (Video)

video September 1:
We saw this this goosefish at Swordfish Seamount during Leg 3 Dive 05. (Video)

A vibrant blue ctenophore seen while exploring a 450-meter contour at the southern end of the Kona Coast of the Big Island of Hawaiʻi.

video August 30:
A ctenophore seen while exploring at the southern end of the Kona Coast of the Big Island of Hawaii. (Video)

This armored searobin of the genus Satyrichthys was seen off the Kona Coast of the Big Island of Hawaii at the Keahole precious coral bed.

video August 29:
Armored searobin seen off the Kona Coast of the Big Island of Hawaii at the Keahole precious coral bed. (Video)

A squid, Walvisteuthis youngorum, is imaged at 900 meters during mid-water transects off Northeast Gardner Pinnacles in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. No species of Walvisteuthis had previously been seen in situ.

video August 18:
A squid seen at 900 meters during mid-water transects off Northeast Gardner Pinnacles. (Video)

This curious squid was seen swimming just above the seafloor while exploring an old reef terrace edge north of Gardner Pinnacles within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument on August 17.

video August 17:
Squid seen while exploring an old reef terrace edge north of Gardner Pinnacles. (Video)

During the expedition’s remotely operated vehicle dive on August 17, scientists saw a very unusual eel with a long, fleshy extension from its nose. Swimming a mile below the sea surface at a terrace near Gardner Pinnacles in the Papahānaumokuākea National Marine Monument, this eel was both a discovery and a mystery.

video August 17:
Scientists saw this unusual eel with a fleshy extension from its nose. It was both a discovery and a mystery. (Video)

A sea cucumber seen while exploring on a ridge that extends to the southeast of an unnamed seamount east of Pearl and Hermes Atoll.

video August 14:
A sea cucumber seen while exploring on an unnamed seamount east of Pearl and Hermes Atoll. (Video)

While we may often think of crinoids as animals firmly attached to the seafloor, they are in fact free-swimming animals.

video August 11:
While we think of crinoids as animals attached to the seafloor, they are free-swimming animals. (Video)

Deep-sea ophidiid fish, Bassozetus sp., photographed on a ridge off Salmon Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

video August 11:
Halosaur imaged on a ridge off Salmon Bank in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (Video)

Underside of a sea star feeding on a bamboo coral.

video August 11:
Underside of a sea star feeding on a bamboo coral. (Video)

A deepwater hermit crab using an anemone as a shell.

video August 9:
A deepwater hermit crab using an anemone as a shell. (Video)

A siphonophore spotted while exploring on August 9, 2015, along a sharp ridge that extended west from East Salmon Bank.

video August 9:
A siphonophore spotted while exploring a sharp ridge that extended west from East Salmon Bank. (Video)

This pretty little jelly was seen swimming just about the seafloor on August 8

video August 8:
This Narcomedusa jelly was seen swimming just above the seafloor on August 8. (Video)

This rattail fish, seen while exploring a ridge south of West Northampton Seamount on August 7, was carrying a rather large parasite relative to its body.

video August 7:
This rattail fish was playing host to a rather large parasite relative to its body. (Video)

Scientists were intrigued by this unusual polychaete, which lacked visible scales. Seen while exploring a ridge that is southeast of Maro Reef on August 6, 2015.

video August 6:
Scientists were intrigued by this unusual polychaete, which lacked visible scales. (Video)

A holothurian, or sea cucumber, swims gracefully through the water column just above the seafloor during exploration of a ridge southeast of Maro Reef on August 6, 2015.

video August 6:
A holothurian, or sea cucumber, swims gracefully through the water column just above the seafloor. (Video)

On August 5, 2015, while exploring a crater near Maro Reef at a depth of ~2,800 meters (1.75 miles), scientists found this unusual-looking sea cucumber that may be in a genus not previously recorded in Hawaiian waters.

video August 5:
While exploring a crater near Maro Reef, scientists found this unusual-looking sea cucumber. (Video)

This acrobatic snail was spotted maneuvering along the seafloor during the August 5 exploration of a crater near Maro Reef.

video August 5:
Snail spotted maneuvering along the seafloor during exploration of a crater near Maro Reef. (Video)

A polychaete scale worm swimming above the seafloor; seen while exploring the eastern ridge of a crater that is located east of Maro Reef.

video August 5:
Scale worm swimming above the seafloor. (Video)

Sea spider, or pycnogonid, seen while exploring a large rift zone ridge north of St. Rogatien Bank.

video August 4:
Sea spider, or pycnogonid, seen while exploring a large rift zone ridge north of St. Rogatien Bank. (Video)

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Images (Daily Updates)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer makes a stop at Kilo pier to offload the ROVs at the conclusion of the 2015 field season

September 30
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer stops at Kilo pier to offload the ROVs at the conclusion of the 2015 field season. (HR)

Rough seas break over the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during the transit back to Honolulu, Hawaii.

September 27-29
Rough seas break over the bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer during the transit back to Honolulu, Hawaii. (HR)

Throughout the dive at Guyot Ridge, D2 observed a diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges.

September 26
Throughout the dive at Guyot Ridge, D2 observed a diversity of deep-sea corals and sponges. (HR)

Ten minutes into the dive, our science team found this unidentified candelabrid solitary hydroid.

September 25
Ten minutes into the dive, our science team found this unidentified candelabrid solitary hydroid. (HR)

One organism's trash is anther's treasure—these crinoids have taken up residence on a tall dead sponge stalk to give them better access to food in the water column.

September 24
These crinoids have taken up residence on a dead sponge to gain better access to food in the water column. (HR)

Another USO (Unidentified Swimming Organism) for the cruise. Our science team was stumped as to what this organism could be.

September 23
Another USO (Unidentified Swimming Organism) for the cruise that left the science team was stumped. (HR)

At the top of the ridge feature visited during Dive 09, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered a dense and diverse deep-sea coral community. In this picture alone are at least four different species of coral and at least 12 different colonies.

September 22
At the top of a ridge feature, ROV Deep Discoverer encountered a diverse deep-sea coral community. (HR)

A rare sighting of a juvinile cutthroat eel will help our scientists learn more about the life history of these fish.

September 21
A rare sighting of a juvinile cutthroat eel will help our scientists learn about the life history of these fish. (HR)

A rare observation of an aplacophoran (shell-less mollusk) feeding on a bamboo coral.

September 20
A rare observation of an aplacophoran (shell-less mollusk) feeding on a bamboo coral. (HR)

During the descent on Dive 06, a one to two-meter squid attached itself to the back of ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) and hung out there for several minutes before coming around to the front of the vehicle, allowing us to get some great imagery of it.

September 19
During the descent on Dive 06, a one to two-meter squid attached itself to the back of ROV Deep Discoverer. (HR)

An unusual jelleyfish noted about halfway through Dive 05 at Deep Twin Ridge.

September 18
An unusual jelleyfish noted about halfway through Dive 05 at Deep Twin Ridge.

During Dive 04, ROV Deep Discoverer documented this USO – Unidentified Swimming Organism.

September 17
During Dive 04, ROV Deep Discoverer documented this USO – Unidentified Swimming Organism. (HR)

One of the many large sponges observed during Dive 03. Look closely and you can see a small shrimp who has taken up residence in the sponge.

September 16
One of the many large sponges observed during Dive 03. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer transits to Johnston Atoll—mapping their way off into the sunset.

September 14-15
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer transits to Johnston Atoll—mapping its way off into the sunset. (HR)

A splendid perch observed towards the top of the pinnacle feature surveyed along the southwest coast of Niihau.

September 13
A splendid perch observed towards the top of the pinnacle feature surveyed along the coast of Niihau. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer recovers a current meter at a dive site just south of Oahu.

September 12
ROV Deep Discoverer recovers a current meter at a dive site just south of Oahu. (HR)

ENS Pestone obverses morning colors.

September 10-11
ENS Pestone obverses morning colors. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer is back at the pier in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, after completing Leg 3 of the Hohonu Moana expedition. The start of cruise leg 4 has been delayed to September 11 – tune back then to follow along as the ship begins exploration of the Johnston Atoll portion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument!

September 4
Okeanos Explorer back at the pier in Pearl Harbor, Oahu, after completing Leg 3 of the Hohonu Moana expedition. (HR)

NOAA’s Deep Discoverer ROV shines its lights on the S-19 submarine resting ~ 415 meters deep.

September 3
NOAA’s Deep Discoverer ROV shines its lights on the S-19 submarine resting ~ 415 meters deep. (HR)

NOAA’s Seirios camera sled images ROV Deep Discoverer shining its lights and cameras on a very dense community of large, presumably very old, colonies of bamboo coral (isididae) that were found on the ridge crest of Ellis Seamount.

September 2
Seirios camera sled images ROV Deep Discoverer shining its lights on a community of bamboo coral. (HR)

High-density coral community encountered as the ROV proceeded up the slope of a pinnacle feature located on the ridge crest.

September 1
High-density coral community encountered along the slope of a pinnacle feature on the ridge crest. (HR)

An extremely old Farrea nr occa erecta sponge found ~2,660 meters deep at McCall Seamount. This species has two types of morphologies – a bushy type and a stalked type (shown here). A fairly large number of dead colonies of this sponge were observed during the dive – this was the only live sponge of this type encountered.

August 31
An extremely old Farrea nr occa erecta sponge found ~2,660 meters deep at McCall Seamount. (HR)

Precious pink coral in the family Coralliidae (left) and gold coral (Kulamanamana haumeae, right) observed during the transect.

August 30
Precious pink coral in the family Coralliidae (left) and gold coral (right) observed during the transect. (HR)

Hoplostethus crassispinus - in the same genus as, and related to the Orange Roughy.

August 29
Hoplostethus crassispinus - in the same genus as, and related to the Orange Roughy. (HR)

Chief Bosun Jerrod Hozendorf watches as ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) is deployed from the aft deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

August 28
Chief Bosun Jerrod Hozendorf watches as ROV Deep Discoverer is deployed from the Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer returned to port at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor this evening, bringing Leg 2 of the Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawai’i Expedition to a close. The next leg of the expedition starts August 28, 2015.

August 23
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer returned to port at Ford Island, Pearl Harbor this evening. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer’s Fast Rescue Boat returns to the ship with the four Monk Seal researchers safely onboard.

August 22
The aft deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer while transiting back to Pearl Harbor, Oahu. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer’s Fast Rescue Boat returns to the ship with the four Monk Seal researchers safely onboard.

August 21
Okeanos Explorer’s Fast Rescue Boat returns to the ship with the four Monk Seal researchers safely onboard. (HR)

Large Styela sp tunicates interspersed with smaller yellow stoloniferous tunicates seen throughout most of the dive.

August 20
Styela sp tunicates interspersed with yellow stoloniferous tunicates seen throughout most of the dive. (HR)

An ocean sunset is seen in the reflection of the port windows on the Bridge of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Inside the Bridge, ENS Chris Licitra examines the ship’s radar for contacts.

August 19
An ocean sunset is seen in the reflection of the port windows on the Bridge of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

A squid, Walvisteuthis youngorum, is imaged at 900 meters during today’s mid-water transects off Northeast Gardner Pinnacles in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

August 18
A squid is imaged during today’s mid-water transects off Northeast Gardner Pinnacles. (HR)

A squat lobster perching on a undescribed genus of bamboo coral (family Isididae). This new genus of coral was first discovered in 2007 off of Twin Banks in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands/Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

August 17
A squat lobster perching on a undescribed genus of bamboo coral (family Isididae). (HR)

NOAA’s Seirios camera sled images the ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) as it illuminates a ledge covered with a diverse assemblage of deep-sea corals and sponges.

August 16
Seirios camera sled images the Deep Discoverer as it illuminates corals and sponges. (HR)

Deep-sea corals and sponges provide habitat and refuge for many other animals living on or near the seafloor.

August 15
Deep-sea corals and sponges provide habitat and refuge for other animals living on or near the seafloor. (HR)

Composite image showing the original Sandwell & Smith satellite-derived bathymetry data at the bottom, with the Okeanos Explorer EM302 multibeam bathymetry transit data further revealing this unnamed seamount overlain on top.

August 14
Composite image showing collected data further revealing this unnamed seamount. (HR)

Purple ctenophore, possible Leucocia sp., imaged at 1,000 meters during today’s water column transects.

August 13
Purple ctenophore, possibly Lampocteis cruentiventer, imaged at 1,000 meters. (HR)

Close up image of a Hexactinellid or glass sponge, with commensal anemones growing throughout its tissues.

August 12
Close up image of a glass sponge with commensal anemones growing throughout its tissues. (HR)

Sea star clinging to a coral.

August 11
Underside of a seastar feeding on a bamboo coral. (HR)

A very large spectacular stalked sponge (Caulophacus sp.) encountered during the dive.

August 10
A very large spectacular stalked sponge (Caulophacus sp.) encountered during the dive. (HR)

Large stalked sponge (Bolosoma sp.) providing a home for a myriad of brittlestars and crustacean associates.

August 9
Large stalked sponge providing a home for a myriad of brittlestars and crustacean associates. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) places a piece of an uknown Corallium species collected at 2,078 meters depth in one of the bio boxes on the ROV. Following collection, the boxes are sealed to keep specimens insulated for their return to the surface.

August 8
ROV Deep Discoverer places a piece of an uknown Corallium species in one of the bio boxes on the ROV. (HR)

Deep-sea fish in the family Macrouridae, possibly in the genus Malacocephalus or Trachonurus, with an isopod parasite. Imaged at 1,814 meters.

August 7
Deep-sea fish in the family Macrouridae, with an isopod parasite. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer places an unidentified sponge in the vehicle's sampling drawer.

August 6
ROV Deep Discoverer places an unidentified sponge in the vehicle's sampling drawer. (HR)

Bathymetric image of a crater located on the eastern Ridge off Maro Reef. The crater is six kilometers (3.1 nautical miles) across and over three kilometers deep, with walls up to 800 meters high. Sonar and sample data collected during this cruise may provide insights into the currently unknown origin of the crater.

August 5
Bathymetric image of a crater located on the eastern Ridge off Maro Reef. (HR)

A corallium that is nearly completely overgrown by zooanthid (another type of cnidarian) and a brittlestar living in association. This particular species of coral is not commercially harvested, but is in the precious coral group that is often commercially harvested for jewelry at shallower depths.

August 4
A corallium that is nearly completely overgrown by zooanthid and a brittlestar living in association. (HR)

A beautiful primnoid coral with a commensal crinoid (sea lily) and ophiuroid (brittlestar) observed on the dive.

August 3
A beautiful primnoid coral with a commensal crinoid and ophiuroid observed on the dive. (HR)

Two rock samples – likely manganese coated basalt – were collected during today’s dive. Both specimens will be sent to Oregon State University’s Marine Geology Repository where they will be described and made publicly accessible.

August 2
Two rock samples – likely manganese coated basalt – were collected during today’s dive. (HR)

An unnamed seamount was mapped during our transit mapping operations today. The 2,865-meter high seamount's peak is 562 meters below the surface of the water, with surrounding water depths of 4,709 meters.

August 1
An unnamed seamount was mapped during our transit mapping operations today. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in port on Ford Island, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

July 31
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer in port on Ford Island, in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Images (Mission Logs)

Summary map showing work conducted during four NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer cruises as part of the EX-15-04 Hohonu Moana Expedition.

Mission Summary
Summary map showing work conducted during four NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer cruises as part of the expedition. (HR)

A new Exploration Command Center was brought online at NOAA’s Inouye Regional Center for the expedition.

Mission Summary
A new Exploration Command Center was brought online at NOAA’s Inouye Regional Center for the expedition.

The University of Hawaii at Manoa brought an Exploration Command Center online this year to enable the participation of scientists and students from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and other universities in the area to participate in the Hohonu Moana Expedition via telepresence.

Mission Summary
The University of Hawaii at Manoa brought an Exploration Command Center online this year. (HR)

NOAA’s Seirios camera sled images the ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) as it illuminates a ledge covered with a diverse assemblage of deep-sea corals and sponges.

Mission Summary
NOAA’s Seirios camera sled images the ROV Deep Discoverer. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer places a piece of an unknown Corallium species collected at 2,078 meters depth in one of the bio boxes on the ROV.

Mission Summary
ROV Deep Discoverer places a piece of an unknown Corallium species in one of the bio boxes on the ROV. (HR)

Maps showing the multibeam sonar mapping coverage in the Johnston Atoll Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument before and after Legs 1 and 4 of the 2015 Hohonu Moana Expedition with NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

Mission Summary
Maps showing the multibeam sonar mapping coverage before and after in the Johnston Atoll Unit.

This distinctive-looking, spiny squat lobster, seen here perched on a black coral, Umbellapathes, at 1493 meters depth in the Johnston Atoll Unit of the PRIMNM, is likely a new (undescribed) species in the anomuran family Chirostylidae.

Mission Summary
This squat lobster is likely a new (undescribed) species in the anomuran family Chirostylidae. (HR)

The cusk eel, Leucicorus lusciosus (Garman, 1899).

Mission Summary
The cusk eel, Leucicorus lusciosus (Garman, 1899). (HR)

Specimen of Corallium species collected from a large high-density deep-sea coral and sponge community encountered on the ridge crest of Pioneer Bank.

Mission Summary
Corallium species collected from a deep-sea coral and sponge community on the crest of Pioneer Bank. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer recovers a current meter at a dive site just south of Oahu.

Mission Summary
ROV Deep Discoverer recovers a current meter at a dive site just south of Oahu. (HR)

A dive during Leg 3 of the expedition visited the S-19 submarine to assess the state of the submarine and survey the settlement of a pioneer coral community covering the sub.

Mission Summary
A dive during Leg 3 of the expedition visited the S-19 submarine. (HR)

Sketch of the S-19 submarine by NOAA Maritime Archaeologist, Hans Van Tilburg, following an ROV dive on the site.

Mission Summary
Sketch of the S-19 submarine following an ROV dive on the site. (HR)

Image of a high-density coral community encountered on the ridge crest of Swordfish Seamount at ~1,000 meters depth.

Mission Summary
Image of a high-density coral community encountered on the ridge crest of Swordfish Seamount. (HR)

A ctenophore with long tentacles was documented not far off the bottom at Southernmost Cone.

September 27 Log
A ctenophore with long tentacles belonging to the Family Aulacoctenidae. (HR)

This sea toad (Chaunocops cf. melanostomus) was spotted during our dive at Southernmost Cone.

September 27 Log
This sea toad was spotted during our dive at Southernmost Cone. (HR)

Deep-sea corals provide habitat for a variety of organisms. Here a brittle star has taken up residence on an octocoral (pink) that is being overgrown by a zooanthid (yellow).

September 27 Log
A brittle star has taken up residence on an octocoral (pink) that is being overgrown by a zooanthid (yellow). (HR)

Scott France and Mackenzie Gerringer in the control room onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 27 Log
Scott France and Mackenzie Gerringer in the control room onboard NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Squat lobsters are common associates on deep-sea corals, like this one observed at Guyot Ridge. Oftentimes a crab species will only associate with a certain type of coral.

September 27 Log
Squat lobsters are common associates on deep-sea corals, like this one observed at Guyot Ridge. (HR)

A chimera observed at Deep Twin Ridge.

September 27 Log
A chimera observed at Deep Twin Ridge. (HR)

If you look closely, you can see the intestinal track of this sea cucumber. Here it is using its adapted feet to bring food-filled sediment to its mouth.

September 27 Log
If you look closely, you can see the intestinal track of this sea cucumber. (HR)

An unusual polychaete documented during our dive at Deep Twin Ridge.

September 27 Log
An unusual polychaete documented during our dive at Deep Twin Ridge. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) images a stalked sponge.

September 27 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer images a stalked sponge. (HR)

Lieutenant Commander James Brinkley on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

September 26 Log
Lieutenant Commander James Brinkley on the deck of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Moonrise over the fantail of Okeanos Explorer.

September 26 Log
Moonrise over the fantail of Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

The Johnston Atoll portion of PRIMNM is so unexplored that on almost every dive, we are finding new organisms that our science team has never seen before, like this squat lobster who we found residing on a black coral.

September 25 Log
On almost every dive in the Johnston Atoll portion of PRIMNM, we are finding new organisms. (HR)

Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming – the first monument.

September 25 Log
Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming – the first monument.

A large aggregation of branched deep-sea sponges documented on Dive 10 at Mid Karin Ridge. These may look like coral from a distance, but once Deep Discoverer got close, we were able to see that they were in fact sponges (see bottom image).

September 25 Log
A large aggregation of branched deep-sea sponges documented on Dive 10 at Mid Karin Ridge. (HR)

A large aggregation of branched deep-sea sponges documented on Dive 10 at Mid Karin Ridge. These may look like coral from a distance, but once Deep Discoverer got close, we were able to see that they were in fact sponges (see bottom image).

September 25 Log
Close-up view of branched deep-sea sponges documented on Dive 10 at Mid Karin Ridge. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer imaged a Bathytyphlops (deep-sea tripod fish with greatly reduced eyes) during Dive 08 at Lone Cone.

September 25 Log
A Bathytyphlops (deep-sea tripod fish with greatly reduced eyes) seen during Dive 08 at Lone Cone. (HR)

A particularly large, and likely very old, colony of Iridogorgia, with several colonies of other octocorals in the background, was imaged at Mid Karin Ridge.

September 25 Log
A particularly large, and likely old, colony of Iridogorgia, with colonies of other octocorals in the background. (HR)

Although Anthosmastus may not be the biggest octocoral, it still provides habitat for other organisms, like this brittle star.

September 25 Log
Although Anthosmastus may not be the biggest octocoral, it provides habitat for organisms, like this brittle star. (HR)

This unidentified ctenophore was observed during Dive 09 at South Karin Ride.

September 25 Log
This ctenophore observed during Dive 09 at South Karin Ridge and belongs to the Family Aulacoctenidae. (HR)

Sponges also provide valuable habitat for small organisms like these two shrimp.

September 25 Log
Sponges also provide valuable habitat for small organisms like these two shrimp. (HR)

The magnificent glass sponge Caulophacus, also known as the white mushroom sponge, was observed on South Karin Ridge during Leg 4 Dive 9 on the Okeanos Explorer with the Deep Discoverer remotely operated vehicle.

September 23 Log
The magnificent glass sponge Caulophacus, also known as the white mushroom sponge. (HR)

Sea stars have what many might consider unusual eating habits. Rather than ingesting prey through its mouth, a sea star will push its stomach out of its mouth to begin feeding.

September 23 Log
Rather than ingesting prey through its mouth, a sea star will push its stomach out of its mouth to feed. (HR)

Known to be a suspension feeder, the ophiuroid (brittle star) pictured here during Leg 4 Dive 10 is taking advantage of the height of an Iridogorgia coral to reach into an area of higher current for food such as organic material.

September 23 Log
This brittle star is taking advantage of the height of a coral to reach into an area of higher current for food. (HR)

Photograph taken from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer dives of the basaltic seamount ‘Karin Ridge’ adjacent to the Hawaiian Islands (~160 kilometers southwest of the islands).

September 23 Log
Photograph of the basaltic seamount ‘Karin Ridge’ adjacent to the Hawaiian Islands. (HR)

A deepwater hermit crab using an anemone as a shell was spotted during Leg 4, Dive 08.

September 22 Log
A deepwater hermit crab using an anemone as a shell was spotted during Leg 4, Dive 08. (HR)

When functioning properly, telepresence can be an amazing outreach tool. Here, Bruce Mundy talks to a group of students from a local Honolulu school visiting the Inouye Regional Center about the expedition and what lies in the unexplored deep sea right in their backyard.

September 21 Log
When functioning properly, telepresence can be an amazing outreach tool. (HR)

With the satellite connection still having issues, the “video interrupted” logo has become one of my least favorite things to see on our website.

September 21 Log
The “video interrupted” logo has become one of my least favorite things to see on our website.

Stalked benthic tunicate from our first dive at Johnston Atoll at Karin Ridge.

September 21 Log
Stalked benthic tunicate from our first dive at Johnston Atoll at Karin Ridge. (HR)

A group of stalked sponges, including some very small recent recruits, at Karin Ridge help give our science team a better idea of the life history of this organism.

September 21 Log
A group of stalked sponges, including some very small recent recruits, at Karin Ridge. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer documented a number of squat lobsters residing in an octocorals throughout the dive at Twin Cones.

September 21 Log
We documented a number of squat lobsters residing in an octocorals at Twin Cones. (HR)

A very small benthic ctenophore rested on a Iridogorgia (coral) at Twin Cones.

September 21 Log
A very small benthic ctenophore rested on a Iridogorgia (coral) at Twin Cones. (HR)

During the dive at Twin Cones, we encountered a large anemone with a number of small polychaete worms roaming over the tentacles.

September 21 Log
We encountered a large anemone with a number of small polychaete worms roaming over the tentacles. (HR)

This sea toad (Chaunocops cf melanostomus), documented during Dive 07 at Southernmost Cone, was a new observation for this region.

September 21 Log
This sea toad, documented during Dive 07, was a new observation for this region. (HR)

Close-up of a bamboo coral with an ophiuroid brittle star intertwining its arms around the branches of the colony.

September 19 Log
A bamboo coral with an ophiuroid brittle star intertwining its arms around the branches of the colony. (HR)

Two large octocoral sea fan colonies grow off the side of a rocky feature at 391 meters off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau.

September 19 Log
Two large octocoral sea fan colonies grow off the side of a rocky feature off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau. (HR)

Several rock pens – a type of sea pen adapted to live on a hard bottom by modifying the peduncle (the large swollen structure at the base) into a form of suction-cup – grow alongside a precious pink coral, Pleurocorallium secundum, at 433 meters depth off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau.

September 19 Log
Several rock pens grow alongside a precious pink coral, Pleurocorallium secundum. (HR)

Several colonies of the hydroid Hydrodendron gorgonoide extend from a rock at 566 meters depth off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau.

September 19 Log
Several colonies of the hydroid Hydrodendron gorgonoide extend from a rock off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau. (HR)

The sea toad, Chaunax umbrinus, a type of deep-sea angler fish, was seen at 328 meters depth off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau.

September 19 Log
The sea toad, a type of deep-sea angler fish, was seen at 328 meters depth off the southwest tip of Ni’ihau. (HR)

Two different species of stony coral, both in the genus Enallopsammia, one purple and one yellow, grow next to one another.

September 19 Log
Two different species of stony coral, one purple and one yellow, grow next to one another. (HR)

A chart to illustrate the taxonomic classification levels of some deep-sea corals as compared to mammals.

September 19 Log
A chart to illustrate the taxonomic classification levels of some deep-sea corals as compared to mammals. (HR)

Blinded redtailed tropicbird on Johnston Island being swarmed with YCA.

September 17 Log
Blinded redtailed tropicbird on Johnston Island being swarmed with YCA. (HR)

YCA feeding on hydrogel loaded with sugar water.

September 17 Log
YCA feeding on hydrogel loaded with sugar water. (HR)

The crew of CAST 10 (left to right): Mike Abemayor, Jake Shaner, Crew Leader Katrina Scheiner, Jack Fields, and Greg Francois.

September 17 Log
The crew of CAST 10. (HR)

Freshly mixed hydrogel after absorbing sugar water pesticide mixture.

September 17 Log
Freshly mixed hydrogel after absorbing sugar water pesticide mixture. (HR)

Volunteer Mike Abemayor applies hydrogel mixture to the YCA infestation area.

September 17 Log
Volunteer Mike Abemayor applies hydrogel mixture to the YCA infestation area. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls into Johnston Atoll.

September 17 Log
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer pulls into Johnston Atoll. (HR)

LT Brian Kennedy, expedition coordinator for this leg, breathes a sign of relief and enjoys the view as the ship is finally underway.

September 13 Log
Brian Kennedy watches as the departs the main Hawaiian islands and heads to Johnston Atoll. (HR)

The black coral Stauropathes staurocrada, here being checked out by a seastar (Hymenaster sp.), at 1,650 meters depth on North Maro Ridge, was first discovered off Penguin Bank, Hawaii, during a Pisces V dive in 1996.

September 12 Log
Black coral that was first discovered off Penguin Bank, Hawaii, during a Pisces V dive in 1996. (HR)

The Pisces V submersible being recovered after a dive during a HURL expedition.

September 12 Log
The Pisces V submersible being recovered after a dive during a HURL expedition.

A sea cucumber (Holothuroidea, Psychropotes sp.) seen at 2,690 meters depth in Maro Crater during Leg 2 of the Hohonu Moana expedition.

September 12 Log
A sea cucumber seen at 2,690 meters depth in Maro Crater during Leg 2 of the Hohonu Moana expedition. (HR)

This unusual eel was filmed during the Hohonu Moana expedition’s remotely operated vehicle dive almost a mile below the sea surface, at a terrace near Gardner Pinnacles in the Papahānaumokuākea National Marine Monument, on August 17, 2015.

September 1 Log
This unusual eel was filmed during a Hohonu Moana expedition’s remotely operated vehicle. (HR)

The eel had an unusual fleshy extension from the snout. The anterior nostril is above the front of the lower jaw, and the posterior nostril is large and directly in front of the eye. A number of the sensory pores on the body and the head can be seen as small white dots.

September 1 Log
The eel had an unusual fleshy extension from the snout. (HR)

Venefica procera is an Atlantic species with a short extension on the snout.

September 1 Log
Venefica procera is an Atlantic species with a short extension on the snout. (HR)

Venefica tentaculata, an eastern and central Pacific species with a moderately long extension on the snout.

September 1 Log
Venefica tentaculata, an eastern and central Pacific species with a moderately long snout extension. (HR)

Venefica ocella is an eastern Pacific species with a very long extension on the snout.

September 1 Log
Venefica ocella is an eastern Pacific species with a very long extension on the snout. (HR)

The armored searobin, Scalicus engyceros, was one of the fishes David Starr Jordan reported among the specimens floating offshore of a 1919 lava flow from Mauna Loa.

August 31 Log
The armored searobin, Scalicus engyceros. (HR)

The Hawaiian spikefish, Hollardia goslinei, was first discovered as a specimen that floated to the surface because of lava from the 1950 eruption of Mauna Loa that flowed into the ocean on the Kona Coast of Hawaiʼi Island.

August 31 Log
The Hawaiian spikefish, Hollardia goslinei. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer filmed this Diplacanthopoma species between (1,096 and 1,380 meters (3,596 and 4,528 feet) on Bank 9, about 50 nautical miles south of Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

August 31 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer filmed this Diplacanthopoma species on Bank 9. (HR)

A second Diplacanthopoma individual with a different color, filmed by ROV Deep Discoverer at Ellis Seamount to the west of Hawaiʼi Island on September 2, 2015.

August 31 Log
A second Diplacanthopoma with a different color, filmed on September 2, 2015. (HR)

Photo of dense red and pick coral (Coralliidae) beds on the western branch of the 1986 Mauna Loa lava flow.

August 30 Log
Photo of dense red and pick coral beds on the western branch of the 1986 Mauna Loa lava flow. (HR)

Young bamboo coral (Isididae) colonizing a rock (right). Gold coral (Kulamanamana haumeaae) after fully colonizing a young bamboo coral skeleton (left).

August 30 Log
Young bamboo coral colonizing a rock and gold coral after fully colonizing a bamboo coral skeleton. (HR)

ROV arm collecting rock sample form the 1868 lava flow in order to confirm the age of the substrate using geochemical ratio and weathering analysis. The laser points (red dots) are 10 centimeters (~4 inches) apart and are used by scientists to determine the sizes of things that they are seeing.

August 30 Log
ROV arm collecting a rock sample from the 1868 lava flow. (HR)

Acoustic current meter with particulate sensor and thermograph.

August 28 Log
Acoustic current meter with particulate sensor and thermograph. (HR)

Flow meter with thermograph.

August 28 Log
Flow meter with thermograph. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer’s fast rescue boat is deployed from the ship and en route to Tern Island to pick up four Monk Seal Researchers.

August 21 Log
Okeanos Explorer’s fast rescue boat is deployed from the ship to Tern Island to pick up four researchers. (HR)

Tern Island, part of French Frigate Shoals, was formed into a runway to serve as a refueling stop for planes en route to Midway during World War II. Some of the buildings, runway, and the original seawall still remain.

August 21 Log
Tern Island served as a refueling stop for planes en route to Midway during World War II. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer’s Fast Rescue Boat returns to the ship with the four Monk Seal researchers safely onboard.

August 21 Log
Okeanos Explorer’s Fast Rescue Boat returns to the ship with the four Monk Seal researchers safely onboard. (HR)

When NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer arrived offshore of Tern Island at French Frigate Shoals, dozens of sea birds flew out to investigate the ship. These included Great Frigate Birds, or 'Iwa,' which are often seen in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Iwa (which means thief in Hawaiian) are infamous for stealing the food of other seabirds, but catch most of their food on their own.

August 21 Log
Dozens of sea birds flew out to investigate the ship, including Great Frigate birds, or 'Iwa.' (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer was also greeted by red-footed boobies, which are the smallest booby found in Hawaii with a wingspan of around one meter (40 inches).

August 21 Log
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer was also greeted by red-footed boobies. (HR)

Scientists participate in the dive via telepresence at the University of Hawaii Exploration Command Center.

August 20 Log
Scientists participate in the dive via telepresence at the University of Hawaii Exploration Command Center. (HR)

Arms of brittle stars (Ophiuroidea) seen interwinted within the structure of a vibrant, pink deep-water coral (Octocorallia).

August 20 Log
Arms of brittle stars seen interwinted within the structure of a vibrant, pink deep-water coral. (HR)

A lush garden of sponges, corals, and whimsical Iridogorgia bella (an octocoral).

August 20 Log
A lush "garden" of sponges, corals, and whimsical Iridogorgia bella (an octocoral). (HR)

A pavement of manganese nodules.

August 20 Log
A pavement of manganese nodules. (HR)

Photo of the entrance to the NOAA Inouye Regional Center.

August 19 Log
Photo of the entrance to the NOAA Inouye Regional Center. (HR)

The NOAA Inouye Regional Center.

August 19 Log
The NOAA Inouye Regional Center. (HR)

The lobby of the NOAA Inouye Regional Center.

August 19 Log
The lobby of the NOAA Inouye Regional Center. (HR)

NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) fishery biologist Bruce Mundy gives background information about the Okeanos Explorer Hohonu Moana expedition in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Hawaiian Islands.

August 19 Log
Fishery biologist Bruce Mundy talks about the expedition to Exploration Command Center visitors.

The U.S. Fish Commission Steamer Albatross prior to its voyage to Hawaii and the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 1902.

August 18 Log
The U.S. Fish Commission Steamer Albatross prior to its voyage to Hawaii in 1902. (HR)

The back deck of the Albatross after a collection of specimens via deep-sea trawling.

August 18 Log
The back deck of the Albatross after a collection of specimens via deep-sea trawling.

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer docked at Pearl Harbor prior to the 22-day expedition to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

August 18 Log
Okeanos Explorer docked at Pearl Harbor prior to the 22-day expedition to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. (HR)

The remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer being brought back on deck of the Okeanos Explorer after a successful dive in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

August 18 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer being brought back on deck of the Okeanos Explorer after a successful dive.

The goniasterid sea star, Calliaster pedicellaris, feeding on a bamboo coral.

August 15 Log
The goniasterid sea star, Calliaster pedicellaris, feeding on a bamboo coral. (HR)

A brisingid asteroid, probably in the genus Hymenodiscus.

August 15 Log
A brisingid asteroid, probably in the genus Hymenodiscus. (HR)

The rarely encountered sea star Pythonaster sp. (Myxasteridae).

August 15 Log
The rarely encountered sea star Pythonaster sp. (Myxasteridae). (HR)

Possibly the largest sponge ever recorded, seen August 12, 2015.

August 15 Log
Possibly the largest sponge ever recorded, seen August 12, 2015. (HR)

Sheet flow from our cruise on a ridge northwest of Maro Reef.

August 13 Log
Sheet flow from our cruise on a ridge northwest of Maro Reef. (HR)

Volcanic rift zone ridge of St. Rogatien, one of our previous dives and a very dramatic example of the types of locations we are targeting on this mission.

August 13 Log
Volcanic rift zone ridge of St. Rogatien, one of our previous dives. (HR)

This photo shows a video still taken while we were traversing over a field of broke up dike rocks. These rocks are typically very angular when they are broken apart as the ones pictured in this image.

August 13 Log
This photo shows a video still taken while we were traversing over a field of broke up dike rocks.

Photo of an intact bulbous pillow lava from a lava flow that was surveyed by the Deep Discoverer on August 13 along a ridge of the Pearl and Hermes Atoll.

August 13 Log
Photo of an intact bulbous pillow lava from a lava flow that was surveyed on August 13. (HR)

Photo showing the rounded, toothpaste tubular look of pillow lavas on a mound that was constructed completely from the pillows not traveling very far horizontally and building on top of each other.

August 13 Log
Photo showing the rounded, toothpaste tubular look of pillow lavas on a mound.

This is a photo of the Deep Discoverer's manipulator arm grabbing a sample from pillow lavas on the seafloor.

August 13 Log
This is a photo of the Deep Discoverer's manipulator arm grabbing a sample of pillow lava. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer moored pier side Ford Island with the final resting place of the USS Utah visible just above the waterline.

August 9 Log
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer moored pier side Ford Island. (HR)

NENS Nick Pawlenko helps load stores aboard the Okeanos Explorer.

August 9 Log
ENS Nick Pawlenko helps load stores aboard the Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Scientists participate in the dive at the University of Hawaii Exploration Command Center via telepresence.

August 9 Log
Scientists participate in the dive at the University of Hawaii Exploration Command Center via telepresence.

A close-up of the Deep Discoverer's stainless steel custom sampling claw, holding a rock sample.

August 6 Log
A close-up of the Deep Discoverer's stainless steel custom sampling claw, holding a rock sample. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer reaches for a rock sample.

August 6 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer reaches for a rock sample. (HR)

D2 stores its rock sample in one of the ROV’s many sampling containers.

August 6 Log
D2 stores its rock sample in one of the ROV’s many sampling containers. (HR)

Chief Boatswain Jerrod Hozendorf drives the Fast Rescue Boat during training exercises.

August 4 Log
Chief Boatswain Jerrod Hozendorf drives the Fast Rescue Boat during training exercises. (HR)

Able-bodied Seaman Abe McDowell directs deck operations during remotely operated vehicle deployment operations.

August 4 Log
Able-bodied Seaman Abe McDowell directs deck operations during ROV deployment operations. (HR)

Remotely operated vehicle Engineers Jeff Laning and Bobby Mohr make final adjustments before a dive.

August 4 Log
Remotely operated vehicle Engineers Jeff Laning and Bobby Mohr make final adjustments before a dive. (HR)

Video Engineer Tara Smithee documents the launch of the remotely operated vehicles.

August 4 Log
Video Engineer Tara Smithee documents the launch of the remotely operated vehicles. (HR)

The Deep Discoverer remotely operated vehicle gets a close up of a mushroom coral at almost 2,000 meters.

August 3 Log
Deep Discoverer gets a close up of a mushroom coral at almost 2,000 meters. (HR)

ROV Deep Discoverer explores a coral wall at North French Frigate Shoals Seamount.

August 3 Log
ROV Deep Discoverer explores a coral wall at North French Frigate Shoals Seamount. (HR)

Beautiful chrysogorgiid coral, Pleurogorgia.

August 3 Log
Beautiful chrysogorgiid coral, Pleurogorgia. (HR)

The bow of NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer as she departs Pearl Harbor, Oahu, to commence Leg 2 of the Hohonu Moana: Exploring Deep Waters off Hawaiʻi expedition.

July 31 Log
Bow of the Okeanos Explorer as she departs Pearl Harbor, Oahu, to commence the second leg of expedition. (HR)

Video engineers Roland Brian and Joe Biscotti work on one of the robotic HD camera’s on the ship’s aft deck while the ship is in port in Pearl Harbor, Oahu.

July 31 Log
Video engineers Roland Brian and Joe Biscotti work on one of the robotic HD camera’s on the ship’s aft deck. (HR)

Food stores being loaded onboard in preparation for Leg 2 of the expedition.

July 31 Log
Food stores being loaded onboard in preparation for Leg 2 of the expedition. (HR)

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Images (Background Essays)

Expedition overview map.

Mission Plan
Expedition overview map. (HR)

The expedition marks the third field season using NOAA’s 6,000-meter remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer and the Seirios camera sled and lighting platform on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

Mission Plan
The expedition marks the third field season using the ROV Deep Discoverer and Seirios camera sled. (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real-time to a shore-based hub where the video is then transmitted to a number of Exploration Command Centers located around the country as well as to any internet enabled device.

Mission Plan
Okeanos Explorer uses telepresence technology to transmit data in real-time to a shore-based hub. (HR)

Cruise map showing the planned operations area for the initial mapping leg. The red line indicates the approximate trackline the ship will follow, and the yellow box indicates the priority area for focused ocean mapping operations.

Leg 1: Johnston Atoll
Cruise map showing the planned operations area for the initial mapping leg.

Colonies of Hawaiian bubblegum coral at 350 meters depth with anemones, brittle stars, and other animals living in their branches.

Deep-sea Corals
Colonies of Hawaiian bubblegum coral with anemones, brittle stars, and other animals living in their branches. (HR)

A Hawaiian species of gorgonian called Rhodaniridogorgia bending in the current.

Deep-sea Corals
A Hawaiian species of gorgonian called Rhodaniridogorgia bending in the current. (HR)

Gold coral (yellow) in the process of overgrowing a bamboo coral colony (orange) that it will eventually completely cover.

Deep-sea Corals
Gold coral in the process of overgrowing a bamboo coral colony that it will eventually completely cover. (HR)

A mosaic of Gloria data for the northern end of PMNM. Note that in this image, lighter color denotes hard seafloor whereas darker color shows softer sediment seafloor.

History of Mapping & Diving
A mosaic of Gloria data for the northern end of PMNM.

The UH swath ship, R/V Kilo Moana.

History of Mapping & Diving
The UH swath ship, R/V Kilo Moana. (HR)

Donut cruise mapping around St Rogatien Banks and French Frigate Shoals.

History of Mapping & Diving
"Donut cruise" mapping around St. Rogatien Banks and French Frigate Shoals. (HR)

Synthesis of PMNM multibeam bathymetry.

History of Mapping and Diving
Synthesis of PMNM multibeam bathymetry. (HR)

Pisces 5 submersible.

History of Mapping and Diving
Pisces 5 submersible. (HR)

Deep-water corals and sponges found in PMNM in 2003.

History of Mapping and Diving
Deep-water corals and sponges found in PMNM in 2003. (HR)

Two unnamed seamounts located southwest of Midway Atoll.

Seamounts
Two unnamed seamounts located southwest of Midway Atoll. (HR)

A flat-topped seamount known only as Bank 9 that has two major terraces and therefore may be a composite of two separate seamounts of different ages.

Seamounts
A flat-topped seamount known only as Bank 9 that may be a composite of two separate seamounts. (HR)

Academician Berg and Turnif seamounts in the northernmost extent of PMNM.  Both are Hawaiian in origin with typical flat tops created when they were at the surface thousands of years ago.

Seamounts
Academician Berg and Turnif seamounts in the northernmost extent of PMNM. (HR)

Ladd seamount in PMNM.

Seamounts
Ladd seamount in PMNM. (HR)

Known occurrences of marine ferromanganese deposits worldwide

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Known occurrences of marine ferromanganese deposits worldwide. (HR)

Geologists surmise the thickest and most metal-rich ferromanganese crusts are found at depths between 800 and 2,500 meters on seamount flanks and summits.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Thickest, most metal-rich FeMn crusts found on seamount flanks and summits. (HR)

Water depths between 800 and 2,500 meters are delineated in red. This is the depth range of crusts thought to have the best economic development potential. Boundaries of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, and Johnston Atoll portion of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument are also shown.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Between 800-2,500 m is depth of crusts with best economic development potential. (HR)

Profile of seamount within Johnston Island EEZ that hosts thick and cobalt-rich crust deposits, all above water depths of 2,500 m.  Bathymetry from ETOPO1

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Profile of seamount within Johnston Island EEZ with thick, cobalt-rich crust deposits. (HR)

Rankings of Prospective Crust Deposits, based on measured crust thickness.

Deep-sea Mineral Deposits
Rankings of Prospective Crust Deposits, based on measured crust thickness. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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