A colony of sand-colored zoanthid polyps overgrows an octocoral skeleton at 2046 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount (the bright white branches on the left are the only remaining living tissue of the octocoral, Corallium). The columns of the polyps are rough-looking due to the sand and mud grains and other debris embedded in the tissue of the zoanthid.

A colony of sand-colored zoanthid polyps overgrows an octocoral skeleton at 2,046 meters depth on Kelvin Seamount (the bright white branches on the left are the only remaining living tissue of the octocoral, Corallium). The columns of the polyps are rough-looking due to the sand and mud grains and other debris embedded in the tissue of the zoanthid. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Our Deepwater Backyard: Exploring Atlantic Canyons and Seamounts.

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