While most of the wood has long since disintegrated from what is believed to be an early to mid-19th century wooden-hulled shipwreck on the deep Gulf of Mexico seafloor, copper that sheathed the hull beneath the waterline as a protection against marine-boring organisms remains, leaving a copper shell retaining the form of the ship. The copper has turned green due to oxidation and chemical processes over more than a century on the seafloor. Oxidized copper sheathing and possible draft marks are visible on the bow of the ship.

While most of the wood has long since disintegrated from what is believed to be an early to mid-19th century wooden-hulled shipwreck on the deep Gulf of Mexico seafloor, copper that sheathed the hull beneath the waterline as a protection against marine-boring organisms remains, leaving a copper shell retaining the form of the ship. The copper has turned green due to oxidation and chemical processes over more than a century on the seafloor. Oxidized copper sheathing and possible draft marks are visible on the bow of the ship. Image courtesy of the NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Download high-resolution image (jpg, 1.1 Mb)

 

Related Links

Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition: April 29 Log

Okeanos Explorer: Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition

NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer

NOAA Ocean Explorer Gallery