Gulf of Mexico 2012




Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition: Media Resources

This media resources page provides members of the media with information; resources; and broadcast, print, and web-quality imagery created by NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research for the Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition.

For more information, contact us.



Press Releases and Activity Logs - Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition

  1. High School Students Tour the Okeanos Explorer (April 30, 2012, mission log)
  2. Public invited to virtually join NOAA exploration of the Gulf, live from the seafloor (April 19, 2012, press release)
  3. New Ocean Exploration Command Center Installed at Stennis (April 19, 2012, press release; pdf 62 kb)



Selected Still Images - Gulf of Mexico 2012 Expedition

  1. NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer (jpg, 1.5 Mb)
    NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer conducts operations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  2. A 'Pregnant' Coral (jpg, 1.0 Mb)
    This is an octocoral, as evidenced by the eight tentacles you can see on its polyps. The white dots you see in its almost translucent body may be developing embryos – baby corals! Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  3. Lophelia Coral (jpg, 1.3 Mb)
    A frame-grab from high-definition video camera on the Little Hercules remotely operated vehicle showing live branches of Lophelia pertusa (in white) growing over dead branches (in brown). Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  4. Shrimp and Black Coral (jpg, 1.3 Mb)
    Shrimp associated with black coral on the eastern scarp above the West Florida Escarpment. Note the small green eggs being held in the shrimp’s abdomen, along with green material under the carapace (heart and digestive area) behind the head. Black corals vary in tissue color, but their skeletons are black; you can see this here just below the tissue. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  5. Spiraling-type Coral (jpg, 1.4 Mb)
    A spiraling Iridogorgid type coral living near 2,000 meters on the margin of a steep scarp south of the DeSoto Canyon. A chirostylid crab, with chelae that are elongate and are directed straight forward, makes a home among the exquisite branches of this colony. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  6. Predation (jpg, 1.4 Mb)
    Predation on the Dragon’s Head at the northern end of the DeSoto Canyon. An anemone is set to devour a hatchet fish it just ensnared with its sticky tentacles. These anemones and fish are abundant on the Dragon’s Head, a 100-meter tall mound discovered on this cruise, covered with extensive coral rubble. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  7. Deep-sea Fish (jpg, 740 kb)
    If the fire on shore had affected Okeanos Explorer VSAT communications, telepresence operations would have come to a screeching halt. None of the undersea footage – including images of these deep-sea fish – would have made it back to scientists on shore. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  8. Ship Timbers (jpg, 1.2 Mb)
    Ship timbers covered in anemone rising from the sediment. Four copper alloy fasteners sticking out the wood secured a wooden hull plank that has been consumed by marine organisms. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Selected Still Images - Okeanos Explorer General

  1. Okeanos Explorer (jpg, 4.2 Mb)
    NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  2. Okeanos Explorer Control Room (jpg, 416 Kb)
    NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Control Room while ROV operations are underway. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  3. Little Hercules ROV (jpg, 700 Kb)
    The Institute for Exploration's Little Hercules ROV, operated by NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer. Little Herc is capable of recording HD video at depths of 4,000 m Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.
  4. Seirios Camera Sled (jpg, 3.7 Mb)
    The Gulf of Mexico 2012 expedition marked the return of a new camera and lighting platform named “Seirios.” Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Fact Sheets

  1. Okeanos Explorer Fact Sheet (PDF, 2.5 Mb)
  2. NOAA Fact Sheet (PDF, 678 Kb)
  3. Expedition Education Lesson Plans (Grades 5-12):
    The Okeanos Explorer Atlas (PDF, 1.1 Mb)
    How to Use Multibeam Sonar Data (PDF, 689 Kb)
    How to Use CTD Data (PDF, 870 Kb)
    How to Use ROV Imagery (PDF, 1 Mb)


 

For More Information

For media, public and government inquiries, contact the NOAA, Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Public Affairs Officer.

Fred Gorell
Public Affairs Officer
Diamond Icon Office: (301) 734 - 1021
Diamond Icon mobile: (301) 802 - 8334
Diamond Icon E-mail Address: Fred.Gorell@noaa.gov

Court Squires
Public Affairs Officer
Diamond Icon Office: (301) 734 - 1030
Diamond Icon E-mail Address: Court.Squires@noaa.gov

NOAA, Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
1315 East West Highway
SSMC III, 10th Floor
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 734 - 1000




Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO)

David Hall
Public Affairs Officer
Diamond Icon (301) 713 - 7671
Diamond Icon E-mail Address: david.l.hall@noaa.gov





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