Photo & Video Log

Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information. If a movie camera icon camera icon is present, a QuickTime video can be viewed by clicking on the image. Other video formats are available on the linked pages. If a Podcast icon Podcast Icon is present, a video or audio file is available for download or you can subscribe to the RSS Podcast Feed. NOAA Podcast RSS 2.0 Feed

If a slideshow icon slideshow icon is present, a visual log of exploration images can be viewed. You can scroll through them one by one, or select the play button for an automatic slideshow.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

camera icon Video & Slideshows

 Images from the hydrothermal vent site found on the ninth and tenth dives of the expedition.

slideshow Vent Site
Images from the hydrothermal vent site found on the ninth and tenth dives of the expedition. (HD)

 Slideshow of some best images from ROV dives during the Galapagos Rift Expedition, July 2011.

slideshow Highlights
Slideshow of some best images from ROV dives during the Galapagos Rift Expedition. (HD)

A deep-sea skate glides by as the science team searches for evidence of hydrothermal venting.

video July 22 Log
A deep-sea skate glides by as the science team searches for evidence of hydrothermal venting.

The ROV traverses the height of a 10+ meter tall extinct sulfide chimney.

video July 20 Log
The ROV traverses the height of a 10+ meter tall extinct sulfide chimney.

This video shows microbial mats and plumes of vent gases and 'flock' (floating white blobs of bacteria) at a diffuse venting site

video July 18 Log
Microbial mats and plumes of vent gases and 'flock' (floating white blobs of bacteria) at a diffuse venting site.

View a slideshow of various images taken between July 9th and 14th depicting onboard preparations for the ROV leg.

slideshow July 11 Log
View a slideshow of various images taken between July 9th and 14th depicting onboard preparations for the ROV leg.

Riftia tubeworms colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of lava.

video Updates - 7/23
Riftia tubeworms colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of lava.

A bright pink Holothurian sea cucumber rests beneath large 'pillows' of cooled lava

video Updates - 7/23
A bright pink Holothurian sea cucumber rests beneath large 'pillows' of cooled lava.

These unique Polychaete worms, with long squid-like tentacles used for breathing, were seen undulating through the water column

video Updates - 7/22
These unique Polychaete worms, with long squid-like tentacles used for breathing, were seen undulating through the water column.

This octopus and several like it were observed for lengthy periods between ship moves, on numerous ROV dives.

video Updates - 7/21
This octopus and several like it were observed for lengthy periods between ship moves, on numerous ROV dives.

 This inquisitive sea turtle descended with and bumped the ROV several times.

video Updates - 7/15
This inquisitive sea turtle descended with and bumped the ROV several times.

A black coral colony with unusually enlarged tentacles provides home to a squat lobster.

video Updates - 7/14
A black coral colony with unusually enlarged tentacles provides home to a squat lobster.

View video of a hammerhead shark lurking around Seirios for a few moments during our first dive.

slideshow Updates - 7/14
View video of a hammerhead shark lurking around Seirios for a few moments during our first dive.

View video of a toadfish.

video Updates - 7/14
View video of a toadfish captured during our ROV dive.

View a slideshow of various images taken between July 9th and 14th depicting onboard preparations for the ROV leg.

video July 14
View some of the spectacular underwater footage captured by the Little Hercules ROV on July 14.

A highlights slideshow of the unique fauna found at the Paramount Seamounts

slideshow July 14 Log
A highlights slideshow of the unique fauna found at the Paramount Seamounts.

Video footage of the Seirios Camera Sled being launched from the ship.

video Seirios
View video footage of the Seirios Camera Sled being launched from the ship.

View a slideshow of the various Seirios Camera Sled components.

slideshow Seirios
View a slideshow of the various Seirios Camera Sled components.

 

 

Images

Hydrothermal plume surveys, bathymetric coverage (partial), CTD Tow Yo data, and ROV dive locations discovering hydrothermal vents during the GALREX 2011 Expedition.

Mission Summary
Hydrothermal plume surveys, bathymetric coverage (partial), CTD Tow Yo data, and ROV dive locations from GALREX 2011.(HR)

Images of the Paramount Seamount biological communities and geological setting obtained during an ROV dive.

Mission Summary
Images of the Paramount Seamount biological communities and geological setting obtained during an ROV dive.

 

 

Riftia tubeworms colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of lava.

July 24 Log
Riftia tubeworms colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of lava. (HR)

Extensive beds of the giant clam Calyptogena magnifica were in abundance at Tempus Fugit.

July 24 Log
Extensive beds of the giant clam Calyptogena magnifica were in abundance at Tempus Fugit. (HR)

This beautiful creature referred to as “dandelion” was discovered by geologists during a 1977 expedition.

July 24 Log
This beautiful creature referred to as “dandelion” was discovered by geologists during a 1977 expedition. (HR)

 

An open lava tube. This collapsed feature often occurs when the outer edges of a flow are quickly cooled by contact with seawater. The insulated lava inside remains viscous and eventually recedes, creating a void.

July 22 Log
An open lava tube. This collapsed feature occurs when the outer edges of a flow are quickly cooled by contact with seawater. (HR)

A deep-sea skate glides through a cloud of diffused "smoke".

July 22 Log
A deep-sea skate glides through a cloud of diffused "smoke". (HR)

Shrimp and crabs colonizing a rock outcrop at a diffuse venting site.

July 22 Log
Shrimp and crabs colonizing a rock outcrop at a diffuse venting site. (HR)

 

Silhouette of Little Hercules as it approaches extinct hydrothermal sulfide spire along the Galápagos Rift.

July 20 Log
Silhouette of Little Hercules as it approaches extinct hydrothermal sulfide spire along the Galápagos Rift. (HR)

Inactive sulfide chimneys along the pinnacle of one tall extinct sulfide spire.

July 20 Log
Inactive sulfide chimneys along the pinnacle of one tall extinct sulfide spire. (HR)

The tubeworms along the Juan de Fuca Ridge are a smaller relative of the ones found on the Galápagos Rift.

July 20 Log
The tubeworms along the Juan de Fuca Ridge are a smaller relative of the ones found on the Galápagos Rift. (HR)

 

Overview in Google Earth (top right) of the area where the Paramount Seamounts are located.  Underneath is an oblique view of Smith & Sandwell (SnS) data of the Paramount Seamount chain.  An arrow points to the seamount of interest.

July 19 Log
Overview in Google Earth of the area where the Paramount Seamounts are located.

EM302 data of the tallest seamount in the Paramount Seamount chain.

July 19 Log
EM302 data of the tallest seamount in the Paramount Seamount chain. (HR)

EM302 backscatter of the seamount showing ROV dive track (in black) which traveled from right to left up the seamount.

July 19 Log
EM302 backscatter of the seamount showing ROV dive track (in black) which traveled from right to left up the seamount. (HR)

 EM302 bathymetry data of the seamount where red represents the shallowest depths and green the deepest.

July 19 Log
EM302 bathymetry data of the seamount where red represents the shallowest depths and green the deepest. (HR)

 ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations.

July 19 Log
ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations. (HR)

 ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations.

July 19 Log
ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations. (HR)

 ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations.

July 19 Log
ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations. (HR)

 ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations.

July 19 Log
ROV image used to ground truth the backscatter observations. (HR)

The Galapagos Rift makes up a tiny portion (86-89° W longitude) of the Mid-Ocean Ridge, a global chain of rarely-seen volcanic activity.

July 18 Log
The Galapagos Rift makes up a tiny portion of the Mid-Ocean Ridge, a global chain of rarely-seen volcanic activity.

Diffuse venting areas, such as this one found on an early dive, host unique microbial communities fueled by nutrients contained in the escaping hydrothermal fluids.

July 18 Log
Diffuse venting areas host unique microbial communities fueled by nutrients in the escaping hydrothermal fluids.

A Brachyuran crab rests on rock near a site of diffused venting.

July 18 Log
A Brachyuran crab rests on rock near a site of diffused venting.

 

To try and close range on the location of the vents near the 2a site, EX ran a CTD tow-yo along the axis after Dive 2. The black dotted line marks the up-and-down path of the CTD as the ship tows it through the water. The tow found a continuous plume along more than a mile of track line, with some turbidity values higher than anything measured during Leg 1. The highest values were found near the western end of the track, with some lower values near the middle.

July 17 Log
To try and close range on the location of the vents near the 2a site, EX ran a CTD tow-yo along the axis after Dive 2. (HR)

The original cruise plan overlaid in Google Earth, showing proposed dive targets 1-4 along with many previously identified sites along the Galápagos Rift.

July 17 Log
The original cruise plan overlaid in Google Earth, showing proposed dive targets 1-4. (HR)

Chunks of pillow lava that cooled rapidly enough to produce a glassy surface and relatively sharp fractures.

July 17 Log
Chunks of pillow lava that cooled rapidly enough to produce a glassy surface and relatively sharp fractures. (HR)

A recent pillow lava flow with biological material resting between the pillows, indicating where low-temperature hydrothermal fluid has been leaking out of the crust.

July 17 Log
A recent pillow lava flow with biological material resting between the pillows. (HR)

A recent lava flow showing white microbial staining on the broken basaltic rocks, caused by discharge of warm hydrothermal fluids through the seafloor.

July 17 Log
A recent lava flow showing white microbial staining on the broken basaltic rocks. (HR)

A field of extinct sulfide chimneys, several meters high, rise above the surrounding seafloor. The pink staining is a combination of biological and chemical processes.

July 17 Log
A field of extinct sulfide chimneys, several meters high, rise above the surrounding seafloor. (HR)

SST Peters installs the Altimeter and battery pack on the CTD frame in preparation for Tow-Yo operations. The altimeter measures the distance of the CTD package from the seafloor while it is near the bottom.

July 16 Log
SST Peters installs the Altimeter and battery pack on the CTD frame in preparation for Tow-Yo operations. (HR)

CTD monitoring crew.

July 16 Log
CTD monitoring crew. (HR)

SST Peters collects water samples from a vertical cast conducted at the site of the strongest plume signal, shown in the data plot.

July 16 Log
SST Peters collects water samples from a vertical cast conducted at the site of the strongest plume signal. (HR)

This is a plot of the data from Tow 02 on Leg 2. The x axis displays the longitude of the tow, the vertical axis is depth, and the shading along the tow is the Light Scattering Sensor data. The dark patch on the left (beginning of tow) is the strongest plume signal.

July 16 Log
This is a plot of the data from Tow 02 on Leg 2. (HR)

This image demonstrates the concept of a CTD Tow-Yo. The CTD is lowered to within 20 meters of the seafloor, and then is cycled between near-bottom and 300 meters above the seafloor (like a yo-yo) as it is towed behind the ship. Sensor data is recorded and monitored continuously to look for signs that plumes from hydrothermal vents are present. Displayed is a perspective view (looking Southeast) of one line of EX EM302 data over the Sandwell and Smith background data.

July 16 Log
This image demonstrates the concept of a CTD Tow-Yo. (HR)

 

 

 

Paramount Seamount at ~800m depth.

July 14 Log
Paramount Seamount at ~800m depth. (HR)

Squat lobsters in the seamount transition zone, a flat area between the rim and the summit cone.

July 14 Log
Squat lobsters in the seamount transition zone, a flat area between the rim and the summit cone. (HR)

Pink brittle stars in the 400m shallow zone along the summit margin.

July 14 Log
Pink brittle stars in the 400m shallow zone along the summit margin. (HR)

This black coral, in addition to the two galatheid crabs weighing it down, possessed strange tendrils hanging in the water column, seemingly wrapped around its stalk.

July 13 Log
This black coral possessed strange tendrils hanging in the water column, seemingly wrapped around its stalk. (HR)

EX Program Manager Craig Russell explains the data path necessary for video and audio from the Okeanos Explorer to reach the ECCs in real time.

July 13 Log
EX Program Manager Craig Russell explains the data path necessary for video and audio to reach the ECCs. (HR)

EM302 multibeam sonar data overlaid in Google Earth, showing the particular seamount in the Paramount chain where the dive was conducted

July 13 Log
EM302 multibeam sonar data overlaid in Google Earth, showing the seamount in the Paramount chain where the dive was conducted. (HR)

An unidentified species of eel peeks up at the ROV from its hole in the seafloor sand.

July 13 Log
An unidentified species of eel peeks up at the ROV from its hole in the seafloor sand. (HR)

Scientists Scott White (left) and Jim Holden (right) observe the video feed from Little Hercules and record their observations in the Eventlog.

July 13 Log
Scientists Scott White and Jim Holden observe the video feed from Little Hercules and record their observations. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer digital atlas frame grab showing the ship’s track over the seamount.  The science team sought to cling to the edges, where they anticipated coral concentration to be highest.

July 13 Log
Okeanos Explorer digital atlas frame grab showing the ship’s track over the seamount. (HR)

The Engineering Department and ROV Team spent the better part of several days fabricating equipment to allow quick and safer repairs.

July 11 Log
The Engineering Department and ROV Team spent the better part of several days fabricating equipment to allow quick and safer repairs. (HR)

Technicians work to repair the satellite antenna in the VSAT dome.

July 11 Log
Technicians work to repair the satellite antenna in the VSAT dome. (HR)

Just before the ship had to get underway, repair technicians successfully fixed one of the key problems. Though it wasn't enough to enable telepresence, on board mission personnel implemented a contingency plan to provide partial capability.

July 11 Log
Just before the ship had to get underway, repair technicians successfully fixed one of the key problems, enabling partial capability. (HR)

As the ship got closer and closer to a go/no-go departure decision. VSAT repairs stretched well into the early morning hours.

July 11 Log
As the ship got closer and closer to a go/no-go departure decision. VSAT repairs stretched well into the early morning hours. (HR)

Matt O’Leary, Jerrod Hozendorf, and Brian Kennedy on the bridge of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer.

July 8 Log
Matt O’Leary, Jerrod Hozendorf, and Brian Kennedy on the bridge of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer. (HR)

Exterior shot of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer while in transit.

July 8 Log
Exterior shot of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer while in transit. (HR)

This mug from the Ship Store perhaps best describes the many unknowns just a few months ago.

July 8 Log
This mug from the Ship Store perhaps best describes the many unknowns just a few months ago. (HR)

 

 

It is impossible to get a photo with entire Galapagos Rift Expedition Team, but this image by Carl VerPlanck captures many of the shipboard personnel.

Updates - 7/28
It is hard to get a photo with entire Galapagos Rift Expedition Team, but this image by Carl VerPlanck captures many of the shipboard personnel. (HR)

With many personnel staying inside to wrap of expedition-related items, exterior ship areas seem relatively quiet.

Updates - 7/27
With many personnel staying inside to wrap of expedition-related items, exterior ship areas seem relatively quiet. (HR)

ROV Technicians continue to trouble-shoot the ROV following a failure of a vertical thruster.

Updates - 7/26
ROV Technicians continue to trouble-shoot the ROV following a failure of a vertical thruster. (HR)

Ship and Mission personnel at the aft control station monitor the final ROV and camera sled recovery of the Galapagos Expedition.

Updates - 7/25
Ship and Mission personnel at the aft control station monitor the final ROV and camera sled recovery of the Galapagos Expedition. (HR)

There is much to do before our last possible dive on Monday, July 25. Though we completed a very successful ROV dive on the off-axis sulfide mounts today, the ROV Team will likely be working late into the evening. Serios's HMI lights failed soon after this morning's launch and a vertical thruster on Little Hercules also failed. The Team expects the HMI light issue will be a relatively easy fix. However, The vertical thruster is likely more problematic. The thruster had failed the previous day and had been replaced with a spare. Because we lost the spare the very next day, the ROV Team must look deeper into the system to find the problem. We're hoping that they'll be able to get everything operational in time for one last dive tomorrow morning.

Updates - 7/24
There is much to do before our last possible dive on Monday, July 25. (HR)

Overnight tow-yo operations across site 4A West and 4A East picked up one strong plume target. It is quite likely that the signal is from the vent we discovered yesterday. During today's dive we are revisiting the new vent site. Our hope it to determine the geographical extent of the site and better document the biological communities.

Updates - 7/23
Overnight tow-yo operations across site 4A West and 4A East picked up one strong plume target. (HR)

Extensive beds of the giant clam Calyptogena magnifica were in abundance at the yet unnamed vent field.

Updates - 7/23
Extensive beds of the giant clam Calyptogena magnifica were in abundance at the yet unnamed vent field. (HR)

Animals living near hydrothermal vents have to survive under harsh conditions like high pressure, steep temperature gradients, and high concentrations of toxic chemicals. Despite these seemingly inhospitable conditions, many animals do more than simply survive. They thrive.

Updates - 7/23
Animals living near hydrothermal vents have to survive under harsh conditions. (HR)

Dr. Jane Lubchenco, Rhode Island Governor Chafee, and Rhode Island Representative Teresa Tanzi.

Updates - 7/22
Dr. Jane Lubchenco, Rhode Island Governor Chafee, and Rhode Island Representative Teresa Tanzi. (HR)

On Friday July 22, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer discovered a new hydrothermal vent field along the Galápagos Rift. Preliminary estimates suggest it may be one of the largest known vent fields on the eastern portion of the Galápagos Rift.

Updates - 7/22
On Friday July 22, the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer discovered a new hydrothermal vent field along the Galápagos Rift. (HR)

The discovery of a new hydrothermal vent field along the Galapagos Rift buoyed spirits on the ship and on-shore. The dive was extended beyond normal operations by approximately 1.5 hrs to maximize bottom time on the site.

Updates - 7/22
The discovery of a new hydrothermal vent field along the Galapagos Rift buoyed spirits on the ship and on-shore. (HR)

Jeff Williams (ROV Co-Pilot), Karl McKletchie (ROV Pilot) and Nick Kraus (ROV Navigator) in the Control Room.

Updates - 7/21
Jeff Williams (ROV Co-Pilot), Karl McKletchie (ROV Pilot) and Nick Kraus (ROV Navigator) in the Control Room. (HR)

Just prior to launch, the crew makes one final check of the connection between the crane and Little Herc.

Updates - 7/20
Just prior to launch, the crew makes one final check of the connection between the crane and Little Herc. (HR)

Little Hercules is lifted off the deck for deployment.

Updates - 7/19
Little Hercules is lifted off the deck for deployment. (HR)

ROV Engineer Bobby Mohr inspects the 'football' during post-dive work.

Updates - 7/18
ROV Engineer Bobby Mohr inspects the 'football' during post-dive work. (HR)

Senior Survey Technician Colleen Peters mounts Niskin bottles on the CTD rosette.

Updates - 7/18
Senior Survey Technician Colleen Peters mounts Niskin bottles on the CTD rosette. (HR)

 Members of the Team responsible for deployment and recovery wear special gloves for protection.

Updates - 7/17
Members of the Team responsible for deployment and recovery wear special gloves for protection. (HR)

 NOAA Scientist Sharon Walker quickly turned around this plot of the overnight tow-yo to better inform the July 17 dive location.

Updates - 7/17
NOAA Scientist Sharon Walker quickly turned around this plot of the overnight tow-yo to better inform the July 17 dive location. (HR)

TScience Team Lead Tim Shank and ROV Team Lead Dave Lovalvo discuss the complex bottom topography of Site 2a.

Updates - 7/16
Science Team Lead Tim Shank and ROV Team Lead Dave Lovalvo discuss the complex bottom topography of Site 2a. (HR)

Younger looking lava indicates recent volcanic activity.

Updates - 7/15
Younger looking lava indicates recent volcanic activity. (HR)

This sea turtle followed Little Herc during its initial descent.

Updates - 7/15
This sea turtle followed Little Herc during its initial descent. (HR)

 Commanding Officer Robert Kamphaus scans the horizon for contacts.

Updates - 7/15
Commanding Officer Robert Kamphaus scans the horizon for contacts. (HR)

This fish spotted on the Paramount Seamounts seemed to use its fins to amble along the bottom.

Updates - 7/14
This fish spotted on the Paramount Seamounts seemed to use its fins to amble along the bottom. (HR)

A hammerhead shark seemed to take interest in Seirios for a few moments during our first dive.

Updates - 7/14
A hammerhead shark seemed to take interest in Seirios for a few moments during our first dive. (HR)

 Silhouetted image of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer bridge.

Updates - 7/14
Silhouetted image of the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer bridge. (HR)

An interesting seamount that the ship passed over today. The location was 88.6690 W 5.5568 N

Updates - 7/13
An interesting seamount that the ship passed over today. The location was 88.6690 W 5.5568 N (HR)

Telepresence Engineer Greg Diffendale takes photos of the VSAT antenna during the Puntarenas inport.

Updates - 7/13
Telepresence Engineer Greg Diffendale takes photos of the VSAT antenna during the Puntarenas inport. (HR)

ROV Engineers Bobby Mohr and Tom Kok take a break from working on the new camera plaform

Updates - 7/12
ROV Engineers Bobby Mohr and Tom Kok take a break from working on the new camera plaform "Seirios". (HR)

NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer VSAT dome.

Updates - 7/11
NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer VSAT dome. (HR)

The ship weighs anchor and we are underway.

Updates - 7/11
The ship weighs anchor and we are underway. (HR)

Technicians work on the satellite antenna in the VSAT dome..

Updates - 7/11
Technicians work on the satellite antenna in the VSAT dome. (HR)

Okeanos Explorer Chief Engineer Bob Dennis considers what additional support he can provide the satellite antenna technicians to faciliate quicker and safer repairs.

Updates - 7/10
Okeanos Explorer Chief Engineer Bob Dennis considers what additional support he can provide the satellite antenna technicians. (HR)

It took just a bit over 36 hours to get the six boxes of replacement parts from Louisville, Kentucky to the ship.

Updates - 7/8
It took just a bit over 36 hours to get the six boxes of replacement parts from Louisville, Kentucky to the ship. (HR)

The Engineering Department spent much of the day fabricating equipment to allow a possible repair on Friday.

Updates - 7/7
The Engineering Department spent much of the day fabricating equipment to allow a possible repair on Friday. (HR)

Almost 15-months ago, the ship mast was lowered to reduce stress on the VSAT. This April 2010 photo shows the VSAT being lowered onto the shortened mast.

Updates - 7/4
This April 2010 photo shows the VSAT being lowered onto the shortened mast. (HR)

Libby Chase, 2010 NOAA Hollings Scholar, served as an on board mapping watchstander during Leg I of the Galapagos Expedition. She created this map using ship data.

Updates - 7/2
Libby Chase, 2010 NOAA Hollings Scholar, created this map using ship data. (HR)

Locations of mantle “hotspots” (orange dots) around the globe. The Galápagos hotspot is marked by the large star.

Leg 1 Summary
Locations of mantle “hotspots” (orange dots) around the globe. The Galápagos hotspot is marked by the large star. (HR)

Bathymetry of the Galápagos Rift region, showing the work areas for Leg 1 of GALREX.

Leg 1 Summary
Bathymetry of the Galápagos Rift region, showing the work areas for Leg 1 of GALREX. (HR)

High resolution EM302 bathymetry collected by the Okeanos Explorer during the EX1103 Leg.

Leg 1 Summary
High resolution EM302 bathymetry collected by the Okeanos Explorer during the EX1103 Leg. (HR)

Oblique angle showing detail of gridded EM302 multibeam bathymetry along Western Galápagos Rift.

Leg 1 Summary
Oblique angle showing detail of gridded EM302 multibeam bathymetry along Western Galápagos Rift. (HR)

An example of a CTD “tow-yo” hunting for hydrothermal plumes along the Galápagos Rift during Leg 1.

Leg 1 Summary
An example of a CTD “tow-yo” hunting for hydrothermal plumes along the Galápagos Rift during Leg 1. (HR)

Oblique angle showing detail of gridded EM302 multibeam bathmetry along Western Galápagos Rift.

Leg 1 Summary
Oblique angle showing detail of gridded EM302 multibeam bathmetry along Western Galápagos Rift. (HR)

Depth profile corresponding to labled points A and B in Figure 6. The spreading center valley is clearly visible at the top of the ridge.

Leg 1 Summary
Depth profile corresponding to labled points A and B in Figure 6. The spreading center valley is clearly visible at the top of the ridge. (HR)

Bubble plume image captured with multibeam sonar on Kilo Moana, March 2010. The red base is the summit of NW Rota-1 volcano on the Mariana arc.

Leg 1 Summary
High resolution EM302 bathymetry collected by the Okeanos Explorer during EX1103 Leg. Image shown north up, grid cell resolution 50 meters. (HR)

The ROV team prepares Seirios for the next dive during an ROV shakedown cruise conducted off the coast of the Channel Islands, CA in April 2011.

Seirios
The ROV team prepares Seirios for the next dive during an ROV shakedown cruise in April 2011. (HR)

Seirios Camera Sled in the test tank after significant fabrication modifications, and engineering upgrades.

Seirios
Seirios Camera Sled in the test tank after significant fabrication modifications, and engineering upgrades. (HR)

Little Hercules during one of his first dives in Indonesia. A number of organizations and people were critical to bringing him back.

Seirios
Little Hercules during one of his first dives in Indonesia. A number of organizations and people were critical to bringing him back.

 

 

The Garden of Eden vent field as seen most recently by Alvin in 2005. This site, hosting Riftia tubeworm tubes, greater than 10 feet in length (shown here), was among the first to be discovered along the Rift, and as of 2005, has been active for more than 20 years.

History
The Garden of Eden vent field as seen most recently by Alvin in 2005. (HR)

Rosebud vent site as seen during its discovery in 2002. The well-developed faunal communities documented 12 years earlier (in 1990) at Rose Garden were apparently buried by a new lava flow just prior to 2002.  The Rosebud site, approximately 200 meters northwest of Rose Garden, supported vent animal communities that are presently in the early stages of development.  The largest Riftia tubeworms shown here, all less than 2 feet-tall, colonize diffuse vent habitats between broken pieces of fresh lava.

History
Rosebud vent site as seen during its discovery in 2002. (HR)

The Calyfield clam field was the western-most known vent field on the Galápagos Rift when discovered 89.6°W. The field hosts a large vesicomyid (Calyptogena magnifica) clam, mussel (Bathymodiolus thermophilus), and endemic sponge community that covers an approximately 60 m x 60 m area. In 2002, extinct high-temperature sulfide chimneys were discovered several hundred meters northeast of Calyfield.

History
The Calyfield clam field was the western-most known vent field on the Galápagos Rift when discovered 89.6°W. (HR)

The 2011 expedition will explore black smoker areas using the Institute for Exploration’s Little Hercules ROV.

History
The 2011 expedition will explore black smoker areas using the Institute for Exploration’s Little Hercules ROV. (HR)

Map of some of the high-temperature and low temperature vent fields and plume signals known prior to GALREX 2011.

Geology
Plate tectonic boundary map of Galapagos region. Galápagos islands are to the south of the spreading ridge. (HR)

Multibeam bathymetry of the spreading axis of the Galápagos rift in the area of investigations on Leg 2. Hotter colors (red) are shallower depth, and the map is shaded relief illuminated from the north to better show the seafloor shape.

Geology
Multibeam bathymetry of the spreading axis of the Galápagos rift in the area of investigations on Leg 2.

 

 

One of the first images of black smokers on the Galapagos Rift (the Navidad vent field) in December 2005.

Biology
One of the first images of black smokers on the Galapagos Rift (the Navidad vent field) in December 2005. (HR)

Map of some of the high-temperature and low temperature vent fields and plume signals known prior to GALREX 2011.

Biology
Map of some of the high-temperature and low temperature vent fields and plume signals known prior to GALREX 2011.

Bythograeid crabs and the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila found at the ‘Rosebud’ vent site.

Biology
Bythograeid crabs and the giant tubeworm Riftia pachyptila found at the ‘Rosebud’ vent site.

The giant clam Calyptogena magnifica was seen in abundance at the “Calyfield” vent field.

Biology
The giant clam Calyptogena magnifica was seen in abundance at the “Calyfield” vent field.

During the expedition, scientists and technicians will focus on little known areas in international and Ecuador waters in the vicinity of the Galápagos Islands.

Mission Plan
Scientists and technicians will focus on little known areas in international and Ecuador waters in the vicinity of the Galápagos Islands. (HR)

This vent site on the Galápagos Rift, discovered in 2002, is called “Calyfield” after the clam (Calyptogena magnifica).

Mission Plan
This vent site on the Galápagos Rift, discovered in 2002, is called “Calyfield” after the clam (Calyptogena magnifica).

The Galápagos Rift Expedition 2011 marks the debut of a new camera and lighting platform named “Seirios”.

Mission Plan
The Galápagos Rift Expedition 2011 marks the debut of a new camera and lighting platform named “Seirios”. (HR)

 

 

 

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