Bioluminescence and Vision on the Deep Seafloor 2015:
Mission Logs

 

July 28: Final Days

July 28: Final Days

I just read my colleague’s (Charles Messing) opening sentence in his log post, and I have one small addition: Working as a scientist on a deep-sea expedition offers numerous opportunities for both wonder and satisfaction and incredible frustration

July 27: ROV Pilot

July 27: ROV Pilot

At times my job is hard work, like when installing all the parts of the remotely operated vehicle system onto the vessel so we can do a job. Other times my job can be easy, like when the ship is moving from one location to another and I can just hang out for a while.

July 26: Crabs, Lobsters and Shrimp, Oh My!: The Evolution of Light Detection in the Deep Sea

July 26: Crabs, Lobsters and Shrimp, Oh My!: The Evolution of Light Detection in the Deep Sea

There is no other way to say it .....Glowing things are cool. We all love the 4th of July because of the amazing reds, blues, and greens that light up the sky in a dazzling array of shapes and colors.

July 25: Wonder and Satisfaction

July 25: Wonder and Satisfaction

Working as a scientist on a deep-sea expedition offers numerous opportunities for both wonder and satisfaction.

July 24: MEDUSA is back!

July 24: MEDUSA is back!

Medusa is back. We found it within a half hour of reaching the bottom. It looked fine but we quickly realized it had dropped its sacrificial weight but was still just sitting there – not a good sign.

July 23: Beautiful Life

July 23: Beautiful Life

Some things in life are easy, like scarfing down a bag of chips. Some things start out hard and then become second nature, like driving a car. But some things are genuinely hard, all the time. Hitting a fastball, parenting a child, and – as it turns out – driving a submarine.

July 22: Medusa Deep in the Gulf of Mexico

July 22: Medusa Deep in the Gulf of Mexico

Medusa didn’t return from its second deployment. We sent the acoustic signal to drop its 75-pound sacrificial weight and return to the surface at a little after 9 PM. From the depth that it is at, below 1,900 meters, it should take a couple of hours to reach the surface, but no such luck.

July 21: Preservation Posse

July 21: Preservation Posse

I am here on Research Vessel Pelican as part of the “preservation posse” with Dr. Messing. Our job, once the poking and prodding are completed, is the taxonomic identification and preservation of specimens collected on each dive.

July 20: Medusa in the Gulf of Mexico

July 20: Medusa in the Gulf of Mexico

Today is the fifth day of our cruise and the Medusa is on her second drop. This is the first time for the Medusa to be in the Gulf of Mexico. The Medusa was the first camera to capture the live images of the Giant squid in the Pacific in 2012.

July 19: Life At Sea

July 19: Life At Sea

The well-seasoned members of the research expedition knew what to expect ahead of time; however, for some of the graduate students such as myself, this is our first experience living at sea.

July 18: Vision of Crustaceans

July 18: Vision of Crustaceans

As part of the Bracken-Grissom team, I am studying the vision of crustaceans in the deep sea. Specifically, we are interested in the visual pigments that enable crustaceans to detect light.

June 17: Day 3

July 17: Day 3

We are on the third day of our cruise and things are going well. Initially we saw many oil rigs and ships surrounding us, but now there is nothing but sapphire blue water in every direction.

June 16: First Days

July 16: First Days

We arrived at the R/V Pelican on a beautiful July day, and immediately got to work unpacking our crates and setting up our labs. Because of the amount of work involved setting up the remotely operated vehicle (ROV), the ROV crew has been working steadily since yesterday.

 

Be sure to check out logs from the Bioluminescence 2009: Living Light on the Deep-sea Floor expedition.

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