Photo and Video Log

This page contains photos and videos taken during the Coral Ecosystem Connectivity 2013 exploration. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information. For video, multiple video formats are available on the linked pages.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

Videos

ROV pilot Lance Horn and pilot trainee Jason White

video August 26 Log
Video from the ROV at approximately 80 meters (262 ft) on Pulley Ridge. (Video)

ROV pilot Lance Horn and pilot trainee Jason White

video August 20 Log
During a scuba dive to vent trapped grouper, six spotted dolphins arrived on the scene. (Video)

A red grouper samples the GoPro camera

video August 16 Log
A red grouper samples the GoPro camera mounted just outsidea chevron trap. (Video)

 

 

 

 

 

Images

Montastraea cavernosa (great star coral).

Mission Summary
Montastraea cavernosa (great star coral). (HR)

Agaricia is the most widespread genus of hard coral at Pulley Ridge.

Mission Summary
Agaricia is the most widespread genus of hard coral at Pulley Ridge. (HR)

 A group of exotic liionfish at Pulley Ridge.

Mission Summary
A group of exotic lionfish at Pulley Ridge. (HR)

Setting the fish traps from the stern of the R/V Walton Smith

Mission Summary
Setting the fish traps from the stern of the R/V Walton Smith. (HR)

The UNCW Undersea Vehicles team

August 26 Log
The UNCW Undersea Vehicles team. (HR)

The ROV team collaborates with the mission scientists collecting video and still images.

August 26 Log
The ROV team collaborates with the mission scientists collecting video and still images. (HR)

Glenn Taylor

August 26 Log
After almost 20 years of operating ROVs, Glenn Taylor is retiring at the end of 2013. (HR)

recovering the Super Phantom ROV to the deck of the R/V Walton Smith.

August 26 Log
Recovering the Super Phantom ROV to the deck of the R/V Walton Smith. (HR)

Tossing one of the 5 cod-ends attached to the MOCNESS

August 25 Log
Tossing one of the 5 cod-ends attached to the MOCNESS. (HR)

TThe University of Miami MOC4 ready to be picked up by the A-frame.

August 25 Log
The University of Miami MOC4 ready to be picked up by the A-frame. (HR)

The screens from the MOCNESS control system.

August 25 Log
The screens from the MOCNESS control system. (HR)

Rinsing one of the MOCNESS nets with seawater.

August 25 Log
Rinsing one of the MOCNESS nets with seawater. (HR)

Halimeda tuna f. platydisca (center).

August 22 Log
Halimeda tuna f. platydisca (center). (HR)

The ROV control console on the R/V F.G. Walton Smith

August 22 Log
The ROV control console on the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. (HR)

The most abundant benthic organisms on Pulley Ridge are algae

August 22 Log
The most abundant benthic organisms on Pulley Ridge are algae. (HR)

The mighty goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara).

August 21 Log
The mighty goliath grouper (Epinephelus itajara). (HR)

A colony of Madracis decactis (Ten-ray Star Coral)

August 21 Log
A colony of Madracis decactis (Ten-ray Star Coral) at about 60 m (200 ft) on Pulley Ridge. (HR)

Surgeonfish larvae caught with our plankton net.

August 21 Log
Surgeonfish larvae caught with our plankton net. (HR)

Chris Malinowski holds up a red lionfish

August 20 Log
Chris Malinowski holds up a red lionfish (Pterois volitans). (HR)

The entire Fish Group “A Team” working-up a red grouper to get samples.

August 20 Log
The entire Fish Group “A Team” working-up a red grouper to get samples. (HR)

Spotted dolphins jump out of the water

August 20 Log
Spotted dolphins jump out of the water as they keep pace with the R/V Walton Smith.They like to gather at the two bows of our catamaran and ride the bow waves. (HR)

ROV pilot Lance Horn and pilot trainee Jason White

August 19 Log
ROV pilot Lance Horn and pilot trainee Jason White recover the SuperPhantom ROV to the deck of the R/V F.G. Walton Smith. (HR)

ROV pilot Lance Horn keeps a lonely vigil

August 19 Log
ROV pilot Lance Horn keeps a lonely vigil on the aft deck of the ship as the undersea vehicle surveys the bottom. (HR)

The end of the days ROV operations were marked by a deep red sunset and calm sea.

August 19 Log
The end of the days ROV operations were marked by a deep red sunset and calm sea. (HR)

ROV crew, biologists and technicians

August 19 Log
ROV crew, biologists and technicians fly the vehicle, monitor video, take still images and record species and habitat observations from the shipboard lab. (HR)

The technical dive team during an in-water decompression stop

August 19 Log
The first of several squall lines approaches the R/V F. G. Walton Smith. (HR)

A silky shark comes in close to pose with the group of divers.

August 18 Log
A silky shark comes in close to pose with the group of divers. (HR)

The technical dive team during an in-water decompression stop

August 18 Log
The technical dive team during an in-water decompression stop. (HR)

Showing off samples of damsel fish collected during a technical dive.

August 18 Log
Samples of damsel fish collected during a technical dive. (HR)

Rinsing a net to concentrate the organisms captured in the light trap for identification.

August 17 Log
Rinsing a net to concentrate the organisms captured in the light trap for identification. (HR)

crewmembers of the Walton Smith deploy a light trap mooring over the stern of the vessel.

August 17 Log
Crewmembers of the Walton Smith deploy a light trap mooring over the stern of the vessel. (HR)

Cedric Guigand prepares to release two light traps into the depths

August 17 Log
Cedric Guigand prepares to release two light traps into the depths. (HR)

These two morays (Gymnothorax sp.) came up in a chevron trap with a pair of groupers

August 16 Log
These two morays (Gymnothorax sp.) came up in a chevron trap with a pair of groupers. (HR)

This beautiful red grouper was fitted with a tag before being returned to the depths.

August 16 Log
This beautiful red grouper was fitted with a tag before being returned to the depths. (HR)

Recovering a large chevron fish trap

August 16 Log
Recovering a large chevron fish trap to the deck of the Walton Smith. (HR)

Crew members prepare the CTD rosette

August 14 Log
An excellent example of a red grouper (Epinephelus morio). (HR)

Red grouper checks out a diver

August 14 Log
A red grouper checks out a diver. (HR)

The R/V F.G. Walton Smith ready to get underway.

August 14 Log
The first deployment of chevron traps upon reaching Pulley Ridge. (HR)

The R/V F.G. Walton Smith ready to get underway.

August 13 Log
The R/V F.G. Walton Smith ready to get underway. (HR)

An Atlantic bottlenose dolphin rides the bow wave on the R/V F.G Walton Smith.

August 13 Log
An Atlantic bottlenose dolphin rides the bow wave on the R/V F.G Walton Smith. (HR)

‘Stiltsville’ is a collection of houses built on the sand banks edging Biscayne Bay

August 13 Log
‘Stiltsville’ is a collection of houses built on the sand banks edging Biscayne Bay. (HR)

The Cape Florida Lighthouse is the oldest standing structure in Miami-Dade County.

August 13 Log
The Cape Florida Lighthouse is the oldest standing structure in Miami-Dade County. (HR)

Deep reefs, referred to as mesophotic coral ecosystems, can be found from 100-330 feet in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

Mission Introduction
Deep reefs, referred to as mesophotic coral ecosystems, can be found from 100-330 feet in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. (HR)

The University of Miami’s technical dive team installing sensors on a mooring buoy.

Project Overview
The University of Miami’s technical dive team installing sensors on a mooring buoy. (HR)

Example of corals and algae found on Pulley Ridge.

About Pulley Ridge
Example of corals and algae found on Pulley Ridge. (HR)

Map of project area showing Pulley Ridge, off the west coast of Florida.

Mission Plan
Map of project area showing Pulley Ridge, off the west coast of Florida. (HR)

The dominant communities providing structural habitat at Pulley Ridge are coralline algae and hard coral.

Mesophotic Coral Ecosystems
The dominant communities providing structural habitat at Pulley Ridge are coralline algae and hard coral. (HR)

Shallow water colony of the great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, in 15 feet of water

Looking Upstream
Shallow water colony of the great star coral, Montastraea cavernosa, in 15 feet of water. (HR)

 

 

 

 

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