Photo Log

This page contains photos of the Monterrey Shipwreck (Site 15577), collected during the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer Gulf of Mexico 2012 expedition. Click on any image to view a larger version and for additional information.

(HR) = "High Resolution" images available.

 

Copper sheathing covers the Moneterrey stern post and lower hull at the stern.

Copper sheathing covers the Moneterrey stern post and lower hull at the stern. (HR)

NOAA's Seirios Camera Platform, operating above the Little Hercules ROV, images the ROV and an anchor inside the bow of the shipwreck.

NOAA's Seirios Camera Platform images the Little Hercules ROV and an anchor inside the bow of the shipwreck. (HR)

A cluster of large of artifacts near the center of the ship contains three artillery pieces, an anchor, and smaller objects.

A cluster of large of artifacts near the center of the ship contains three artillery pieces, an anchor, and smaller objects. (HR)

This is the first image of site 15577 when the shipwreck was discovered during a side-scan sonar survey of the Monterrey lease block in October 2011.

The first image of site 15577 when the shipwreck was discovered during a sonar survey of the Monterrey lease block in 2011. (HR)

Several pieces of the ship’s compass were found in the aft part of the vessel.

Several pieces of the ship’s compass were found in the aft part of the vessel. (HR)

NOAA's Seirios Camera Platform, operating above the Little Hercules ROV, images the ROV and an anchor inside the bow of the shipwreck.

The ship’s iron stove rests on the edge of a lead sheet placed underneath to protect the wooden ship from catching on fire. (HR)

While most of the wooden hull has long since disintegrated from the shipwreck, copper that sheathed the hull beneath the waterline as a protection against marine-boring organisms remains, leaving a copper shell that retains the form of the ship.

While most of the wooden hull has long since disintegrated from the shipwreck, a copper shell that retains the form of the ship. (HR)

Sand clocks, or sand glasses, were used as timers for the chip log line.

Sand clocks, or sand glasses, were used as timers for the chip log line. (HR)

An unexpected resident on the site is a tube worm more commonly associated with gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico.

An unexpected resident on the site is a tube worm more commonly associated with gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. (HR)

A variety of artifacts inside the ship's hull relate to daily life on board. Artifacts include ceramic plates, platters, and bowls; and glass liquor, wine, medicine, and food storage bottles of many shapes and colors (some with the contents still sealed inside). Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

A variety of artifacts inside the ship's hull relate to daily life on board. (HR)

Wooden portions of this octant or sextant are now largely consumed but the brass pieces are in situ and articulated.  Prior to use of the Global Positioning System (GPS), ships used celestial navigation, measuring the angle between the Earth’s horizon and planets, stars and the sun, to find their position and navigate the sea.  Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Wooden portions of this octant are now largely consumed but brass pieces are in situ and articulated. (HR)

Glass bottles of this shape and size were used to hold medicine as part of the ship’s medical supplies.  Two of the bottles still contain organic material, possibly sliced ginger used for sea sickness. Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Glass bottles of this shape and size were used to hold medicine. (HR)

Details on trigger guards and other parts of the firing mechanisms suggest these are British arms known as “Brown Bess” muskets, manufactured from the mid-18th to the early 19th century.  Due to the large quantity of Brown Bess muskets manufactured, large surpluses of the arms were sold outside Britain so their use persisted for many decades after they were no longer made.   Future study of recovered artifacts may confirm this identification.  Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Details on trigger guards and firing mechanisms suggest these are British arms called “Brown Bess” muskets (HR)

Two clusters of muskets were found on the wreck in an arrangement that suggests they were packed or stowed together. An anemone lives on top of a musket in one of the clusters.  Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

Two clusters of muskets found on the wreck in an arrangement suggesting they were stowed together. (HR)

NOAA's Seirios Camera Platform images ROV Little Hercules hovering over artifacts near the stern.  Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program.

NOAA's Seirios Camera Platform images ROV Little Hercules hovering over artifacts near the stern. (HR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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