Submarine Ring of Fire 2012: Northeast Lau Basin Expedition Video

2012 Video Playlist | NE Lau Response Cruise 2009 | Bathymetry Fly-throughs | Behind the Science

Ring Of Fire 2012-2002 Expeditions Video Playlist

Select a video from the playlist by clicking on an icon featured along the right side of the player window. To learn more about the science and participate in the expedition, go to the Ring Of Fire 2012 website or click on the other related links at the bottom of this page. Share the video clips by email with your friends or embed them on your blog.


Thanks for following the Submarine Ring of Fire 2012: Northeast Lau Basin expedition as scientists explored the submarine volcanoes of the Western Pacific. This interdisciplinary team of 27 scientists and technical experts from the United States, New Zealand and Australia worked closely with a team from the MARUM Center for Marine Environmental Sciences from the University of Bremen (Federal Republic of Germany) to utilize the remotely operated vehicle Quest 4000 to conduct visual surveys; collect sediment samples; and map the geological, biological, archaeological, and chemical aspects of 2012 target areas.

State-of-the-art exploration and telepresence technology allowed you to join us throughout the exploration, as discoveries were shared live on the web, putting the unexplored ocean directly in your hands.

The 2012 expedition marked the return to the Lau Basin where, in 2009, scientists had captured on video evidence of the world's deepest active submarine volcanic eruption. Click here to watch video from 2009.

All video courtesy of Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Exploration, MARUM, University of Bremen and NOAA-Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory.

 

Expedition Video Pages [ Downloads ]

Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 Expedition Video

This page contains links to the expedition video pages that have additional information and other video formats for download. If an iPod link or Podcast icon Podcast Icon is present, a video or audio file is available for download. You can also subscribe to the RSS Feed. NOAA Podcast RSS 2.0 Feed



Scientist observe the Mata Fitu vent community were they discovered several scale worms. The science team observes bubbling sulfur chimneys at the Niua North hydrothermal site at around 800 meters A gravid (with eggs) shrimp at Niua North hydrothermal vent site. Fly-through from the north to the south along the Northeast Lau basin.

camera icon Dive 9 Highlights -
Niua North hydrothermal vent plumes and marine life.

camera icon Dive 8 Highlights -
Chimneys at Mata Fitu looked like Christmas trees.

camera icon Dive 7 Highlights -
Stalked barnacles filter-feeding with their white "citti" at Mata Ua.

camera icon Dive 1 Highlights -
The science team explores bacterial mats at Vai Lili.

             
Fly-through from the north to the south along the Northeast Lau basin. Fly-through from the south toward the north along the Lau basin. 3D images slideshow of the Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 proposed remotely operated vehicle dive sites. ROV dive highlight image collection.

camera icon NE Lau Basin
Fly-through from the north to the south along the Northeast Lau basin.

camera icon NE Lau Basin
Fly-through from the south toward the north along the Lau basin.

camera icon NE Lau Basin
3D images slideshow of the Submarine Ring of Fire 2012 proposed ROV dive sites.

camera icon Mission Summary
ROV dive highlight image collection.

             
Hot shimmering water vents from a black chimney as a fish swims by and narrowly avoids its scalding temperatures. 'Beehive' chimneys seen at Niua South are covered with two species of snails and shrimp.    

camera icon Dive Q333
Hot shimmering water vents from a black chimney as a fish swims by and narrowly avoids its scalding temperatures.

camera icon Dive Q333 'Beehive' chimneys seen at Niua South are covered with two species of snails and shrimp.

   
             
Huge numbers of scaleworms were observed on the seafloor and (as seen here) free-swimming, at West Mata. Elongated pillow lava tubes that formed on the steep slope of West Mata are truncated along the rim of the new pit crater. Thousands of shrimp swim up off the bottom when the ROV bumps a rock at West Mata Huge numbers of scaleworms were observed on the seafloor and (as seen here) free-swimming, at West Mata.

camera icon Dive Q332 Huge numbers of scaleworms were observed on the seafloor and (as seen here) free-swimming, at West Mata.

camera icon Dive Q332
Elongated pillow lava tubes that formed on the steep slope of West Mata are truncated along the rim of the new pit crater.

camera icon Dive Q332 Thousands of shrimp swim up off the bottom when the ROV bumps a rock at West Mata

camera icon Dive Q332 Close-up of pillow lava formations exposed in the wall of a new pit crater at West Mata.

             
The ROV explores vertical cliffs where a landslide occurred between 2010-2011 at West Mata.      

camera icon Dive Q332 The ROV explores vertical cliffs where a landslide occurred between 2010-2011 at West Mata.

 

 

 

             
Time-lapse views of densely packed crabs, shrimp, snails, eelpouts, and other vent animals at Mata Tolu. This small chimney is host to a diverse group of animals including snails, shrimp, hermit crabs, true crabs, and scaleworms.` A large extinct chimney with spires towers over a smaller active chimney at Mata Tolu. A complex of hydrothermal chimneys and their associated biological communities, seen at Mata Tolu.

camera icon Dive Q331 Time-lapse views of densely packed crabs, shrimp, snails, eelpouts, and other vent animals at Mata Tolu.

camera icon Dive Q331
This small chimney is host to a diverse group of animals including snails, shrimp, hermit crabs, true crabs, and scaleworms.

camera icon Dive Q331
A large extinct chimney with spires towers over a smaller active chimney at Mata Tolu.

camera icon Dive Q331
A complex of hydrothermal chimneys and their associated biological communities, seen at Mata Tolu.

             
At the base of this chimney at Mata Tolu colonies of white and blue snail are segregated, probably because of different temperature preferences. Close-up of a chimney spire covered in snails, shrimp, scaleworms, and crabs at Mata Tolu.    

camera icon Dive Q331
At the base of this chimney at Mata Tolu colonies of white and blue snail are segregated, probably because of different temperature preferences.

camera icon Dive Q331
Close-up of a chimney spire covered in snails, shrimp, scaleworms, and crabs at Mata Tolu.

 

 

             
The science team observes bubbling sulfur chimneys at the Niua North hydrothermal site at around 800 meters The ROV finds the source of the sulfur-rich plume as it rises out of the pit crater at Niua North. A gravid (with eggs) shrimp at Niua North hydrothermal vent site. A thick white sulfur-rich plume is emitted from the pit crater at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
Sulfur-rich plumes billow out of the pit at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
The ROV finds the source of the sulfur-rich plume as it rises out of the pit crater at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
At least two species of shrimp graze on microbial mats on deposits of sulfur in the crater at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
A thick white sulfur-rich plume is emitted from the pit crater at Niua North.

             
A shrimp with eggs visible beneath its translucent carapace. Close-up view of two different species of shrimp living at Niua North. A sediment sample is taken among a dense colony of live mussels at Niua North. The ROV uses a scoop net to collect mussels at Niua North, then shrimp swim out of the way during a transit, followed by a close view of a crab.

camera icon Dive Q330
A shrimp with eggs visible beneath its translucent carapace.

camera icon Dive Q330
Close-up view of two different species of shrimp living at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
A sediment sample is taken among a dense colony of live mussels at Niua North.

camera icon Dive Q330
The ROV uses a scoop net to collect mussels at Niua North, then shrimp swim out of the way during a transit, followed by a close view of a crab.

             
Larger chimneys emitting smokey vent fluids at Mata Fitu are covered in stalked barnacles. Squat lobsters swim away as the ROV approaches a chimney with thin finger-like spires. Clusters of chimneys of different shapes, sizes and colors cover the slope at Mata Fitu. Pink scaleworms graze on the microbial mats living on the chimneys at Mata Fitu.

camera icon Dive Q329
Larger chimneys emitting smokey vent fluids at Mata Fitu are covered in stalked barnacles.

camera icon Dive Q329
Squat lobsters swim away as the ROV approaches a chimney with thin finger-like spires.

camera icon Dive Q329
Clusters of chimneys of different shapes, sizes and colors cover the slope at Mata Fitu.

camera icon Dive Q329
Pink scaleworms graze on the microbial mats living on the chimneys at Mata Fitu.

             
Clear hot vent fluids are supporting a diverse ecosystem on the active chimneys at Mata Fitu. Scientist observe the Mata Fitu vent community were they discovered several scale worms.    

camera icon Dive Q329
Clear hot vent fluids are supporting a diverse ecosystem on the active chimneys at Mata Fitu.

camera icon Dive Q329
Active sulfide chimneys at Mata Fitu resemble christmas trees after a recent snowfall. In this case, the white areas are microbial mats.

 

 

             
A group of chimneys, almost entirely covered in stalked barnacles, rises impressively above the seafloor at Mata Ua. Fly-through from the north to the south along the Northeast Lau basin. Black smoker vents at Mata Ua emit a turbulent stream of super-heated water and mineral particles. At Mata Ua, a cluster of stalked barnacles filter feed by waving their fan-like cirri to capture microscopic organisms suspended in the warm vent water.

camera icon Dive Q328
A group of chimneys, almost entirely covered in stalked barnacles, rises impressively above the seafloor at Mata Ua.

camera icon Dive Q328
Scientists discover black smoker chimneys on the second ROV dive at the Mata Ua volcano at a depth of 2,100 meters.

camera icon Dive Q328
Black smoker vents at Mata Ua emit a turbulent stream of super-heated water and mineral particles.

camera icon Dive Q328
At Mata Ua, a cluster of stalked barnacles filter feed by waving their fan-like cirri to capture microscopic organisms suspended in the warm vent water.

             
An enormous number of Opaepele shrimp have colonized West Mata since it was last seen erupting in 2009. A bizarre looking, 'hairy' crab of the genus Paralomis crawls out of a crack that is venting warm fluids at West Mata.    

camera icon Dive Q327
An enormous number of Opaepele shrimp have colonized West Mata since it was last seen erupting in 2009.

camera icon Dive Q327
A bizarre looking, 'hairy' crab of the genus Paralomis crawls out of a crack that is venting warm fluids at West Mata.

 

 

             
A group of chimneys, almost entirely covered in stalked barnacles, rises impressively above the seafloor at Mata Ua. The Quest 4000 ROV surveys a cluster of 20+ active chimneys, named Adelaide Spires by the science team. Smokey hydrothermal fluid billows from atop a large chimney at Niua South.  

camera icon Dive Q326
Hydrothermal fluid gushes from vents near the top of a chimney at Niua South.

camera icon Dive Q326
The Quest 4000 ROV surveys a cluster of 20+ active chimneys, named Adelaide Spires by the science team.

camera icon Dive Q326
Smokey hydrothermal fluid billows from atop a large chimney at Niua South.

 

             
A lone squat lobster clings to a rock at Mata Ua, indicating that the ROV was getting near to hydrothermal vents. Serpentine pillow lava tubes were encountered on the flanks of Mata Ua volcano.    

camera icon Dive Q325
A lone squat lobster clings to a rock at Mata Ua, indicating that the ROV was getting near to hydrothermal vents.

camera icon Dive Q325
Serpentine pillow lava tubes were encountered on the flanks of Mata Ua volcano.

 

 

             
A lone squat lobster clings to a rock at Mata Ua, indicating that the ROV was getting near to hydrothermal vents. Serpentine pillow lava tubes were encountered on the flanks of Mata Ua volcano.    

camera icon Dive Q324
The ROV climbs to the rim of the crater at the top of the central cone at Volcano O where hot shimmering water diffuses through the ash deposits.

camera icon Dive Q324
Microbially-produced gelatinous globules covered large areas of seafloor on the flanks of the cone of Volcano O.

 

 

             
A crab and snail are collected for research by the ROVs suction sampler. A forest of active and inactive chimneys hosts active vents with clusters of snails (2 species), limpets, crabs and shrimp. Fields of dead mussel shells, coated with a black manganese-oxide, littered the seafloor near sulfide chimneys at Fonualei Rift. Smoky hot vent fluid rises relatively calmly from a chimney at Fonualei Rift.

camera icon Dive Q323
A crab and snail are collected for research by the ROVs suction sampler.

camera icon Dive Q323
A forest of active and inactive chimneys hosts active vents with clusters of snails (2 species), limpets, crabs and shrimp.

camera icon Dive Q323
Fields of dead mussel shells, coated with a black manganese-oxide, littered the seafloor near sulfide chimneys at Fonualei Rift.

camera icon Dive Q323
Smoky hot vent fluid rises relatively calmly from a chimney at Fonualei Rift.

             
The ROV rises slowly to the top of one of the largest chimneys at Fonualei Rift. Some of the giant spires at Fonualei Rift reached 35-40 meters above the seafloor. A colorful array of chimney formations seen at 1,555m depth at Fonualei Rift.  

camera icon Dive Q323
The ROV rises slowly to the top of one of the largest chimneys at Fonualei Rift.

camera icon Dive Q323
Some of the giant spires at Fonualei Rift reached 35-40 meters above the seafloor.

camera icon Dive Q323
A colorful array of chimney formations seen at 1,555m depth at Fonualei Rift.

 

             
Microbial mats are sampled in a scoop by the ROV’s manipulator arm. The ROV measures the temperature of the vent fluids where microbial mats will be collected. The yellow areas are places where the underlying iron-oxide mat has extruded through the overlying black manganese-oxide mat. The ROV manipulator arm collects manganese and iron oxide mats with the 'Texas Scoop'

camera icon Dive Q322
Microbial mats are sampled in a scoop by the ROV’s manipulator arm.

camera icon Dive Q322
The ROV measures the temperature of the vent fluids where microbial mats will be collected.

camera icon Dive Q322
The yellow areas are places where the underlying iron-oxide mat has extruded through the overlying black manganese-oxide mat.

camera icon Dive Q322
The ROV uses a scoop sampler to collect mats of both types for DNA analysis.

             
The Quest 4000 ROV manipulator arm is used to probe the manganese-encrusted mats. The science team explores bacterial mats from the Vai Lili hydrothermal vent    

camera icon Dive Q322
The ROV’s manipulator arm probes the mat showing that the black mat is just a thin crust over the thicker fluffy yellow mat.

camera icon Dive Q322
Microbial mats of two types are found at this unusual vent site at Vai Lili. The black areas are a thin manganese-oxide mat over a thicker yellow iron-oxide mat.

 

 

             
           

 


Related Links

Submarine Ring of Fire 2012: Northeast Lau Basin
[ Interactive Map ]

Submarine Ring of Fire 2012

Northeast Lau Response Cruise 2009

Submarine Ring of Fire 2007

Submarine Ring of Fire 2006

Submarine Ring of Fire 2006: Mariana Arc

New Zealand American Submarine Ring of Fire 2005

Submarine Ring of Fire 2004

Submarine Ring of Fire 2003

Submarine Ring of Fire 2002

Magic Mountain Virtual Site


Follow Ocean Explorer on Twitter Twitter External Link

Ocean Explorer Podcast NOAA Podcast RSS 2.0 Feed External Link

Ocean Explorer YouTube Channel Video YouTube External Link