Ben Grupe begins to prepare the CTD bottles for deployment, an instance when being tall comes in handy. Normally, scientists have to climb onto the white frame to cock the bottle caps. As the CTD is lowered into the ocean, a computer is used to watch the data and order bottles to snap shut, collecting water samples from different depths.

Ben Grupe (left) prepares the conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) bottles for deployment. This is one instance when being tall comes in handy. Normally, scientists have to climb onto the white frame to cock the bottle caps. As the CTD is lowered into the ocean, a computer monitors the data and orders bottles to snap shut, collecting water samples from different depths. Image courtesy of INSPIRE: Chile Margin 2010.

INSPIRE: Chile Margin 2010

INSPIRE: Chile Margin 2010: March 2 Log

NOAA Ocean Explorer Gallery